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Full text of "Reports of proceedings .."

BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://archive.org/details/reportsofproceed1875bost 



REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 



FOE THE MUNICIPAL YEAE 1875, 



Commencing Monday, January 4th, 1875, and ending Monday, 

January 3d, 1876. 



BEING REPRINTS OF REPORTS AS PUBLISHED BY CONTRACT IN THE 

"BOSTON EVENING TRANSCRIPT." 



WITH 



A CLASSIFIED INDEX AND INTRODUCTORY NOTES, 

(L'RK PARED UNDER SUPERVISION OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PRINTING.) 

[Seventh. A. n n. tx a 1 "Volume.] 




BOSTON: 

PRESS OF ROCKWELL & CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS. 

(REPRINTS OF REPORTS FROM THE TRANSCRIPT PRESS.) 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE. 



* ♦ »■ 



The following Index has been prepared in accordance with 
a vote of the Committee on Printing. 

In this compilation, the following topics are omitted, as 
not essential, or as better classified for reference in De- 
partment offices: — 

Petitions received and referred. See City Clerk. 

Orders of notice, and hearings, unless subjects of disoussion. 

See City Clerk. 
Committees. See pocket edition of " Organization of City 

Government, 1875." 
Police Officers and Special Police. See Police Department 

Records. 
Truant Officers. See School Department. 
Fire Department Officers and Members. See Department 

Report and Records. 
Jurors, list of, and jurors drawn. See City Clerk's Lists. 
Constables and Constables' Bonds. See City Clerk's Lists. 
Streets, betterments assessed and abated. See Records of 

Street Commissioners and Supt. Streets. 



Streets, temporary closing, removal of obstructions, paving, 
etc., front of estates. See Supt. Streets. 

Sewers, assessments made, abated, and postponed. See 
Records of Sewer Department. 

Buildings, permits authorized. See Records of Inspector of 
Buildings. 

Public Buildings, use of granted. See Supt. Public Buildings. 

Extensions of time for building. See Supt. Public Lands. 

Taxes, assessed and abated. See Assossors. 

Claims, allowed, and leave to withdraw, unless subjects of 
disoussion. See Clerk of Committees. 

Auditor's Monthly Exhibits. See City Documents. 

Leases. See Auditor of Accounts. 

Licenses to Auctioneers, Undertakers, Victuallers, Pawnbrok- 
ers, Newsboys, Bootblaoks, and for Steam Engines and 
Boilers, Hoisting Beams, Storage of Petroleum, Stables, 
Carriages, Wagons, Sprinkling Streets, Intelligence 
Offices, sale of Second-hand Articles, Billiard Halls, 
Projecting Signs and Lanterns, Exhibitions, etc. See 
Lists and Records of City Clerk. 



Note relating to the City Publications. 



The Third Report of the Superintendent of Printing (City 
Document 114, 1873) contains a full explanatory list of the 
City Publications. The report is out of print in pamphlet 
form, but may be found in the bound volumes of 1873, vol. 4. 

Subsequent modifications of the above-mentioned list have 

occurred as follows: — 

A revised "Index to the City Documents, 1834 to 1874," com- 
piled by James M. Bugbee, has been printed in pam- 
phlet form, and placed in the first volume of the bound 
set of Documents of 1874. 

Laws and Ordinances. — A volume has been issued, "com- 
prising all the Ordinances and parts of Ordinances passed 
by the City Council, and all the rules and regulations 
passed by the Board of Aldermen," from the date of the 
previous revision (Jan. 1st, 1870,) to August 1st, 1874. 
A pamphlet supplement has also been issued, comprising 
the Laws for 1874, and Ordinances for the remainder of 
the year. 

Drake's History of Boston. — A communication from Mr. 
Drake, stating his inability to proceed with this work, 
was referred to tho Committee on Printing, and Mr. 
Drake's decease has terminated the contract made with 
him (on Auditor's files). 

A Memorial of Charles Sumner from the City of Boston has 
been issued, comprising the Action of the City Govern- 
ment, and of tho citizens in Faneuil Hall, the Funeral 
Services, the Memorial Services, and the Eulogy by 
Hon. Carl Schurz. 

A memorial volume of the Centennial Celebration, June Yith, 
has been issued, in accordance with order on page 35C. 



An Index to the City Council Reports of Proceedings for the 
year 1872 has been printed. 

An Ordinance passed Sept. 29, 1874, requires the Printing 
Committee "to designate the number of public docu- 
ments, books or pamphlets" authorized by the City 
Council, and gives the City Messenger the "care, cus- 
tody and distribution of said documents, books and 
pamphlets, subject to such rules and regulations as the 
said Committee may adopt." 

An Ordinance passed Dec. 8, 1874, empowers the Printing 
Coinmitteo to " authorize tho sale at an approximate cost 
price of any surplus bound copies of any such docu- 
ments, books or pamphlets." 

The Printing Committee have passed the following order: 
"Ordered, That the City Messenger be authorized to 
sell to parties applying therefor any surplus bound 
copies of the Revised Ordinances of 18U9, and of the 
Supplement thereto, at the following prices: Revised 
Ordinances of 18G9. $4.00 per copy; Supplement, 1870 
to 1874, in cloth $1.00, in calf $1.50." The Committee 
have also directed that tho City Messenger continue to 
supply the Ordinances to members-elect of the City 
Government, and the city publications to applicants in 
certain cases; and discontinue supplying the City Coun- 
cil Reports of Proceedings to persons not connected with 
the City Government, the Press excepted. The distri- 
bution of the city publications is discretionary with the 
City Messenger, when directions from the Committee 
are inapplicable. 

January 1, 1870. 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS IN CONVENTION. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CITY GOVERNMENT. 

January 4th, 1875. 

Prayer by Rev. George Putnam, 1 

Oath of office administered to Hon. Samuel C. Cobb, Mayor. 

elect, by Hon. Horace Gray, Chief Justice of the Supreme 

Judicial Court, 1 



Oaths of office administered by Mayor to members-elect of each 

branch of City Council, 1 
Delivery of Mayor's Inaugural Address, 1 

Election and Qualification of City Clerk. 

Samuel F. McCleary elected, 2 

Oath of office administered by Mayor, 2 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



ORGANIZATION AND REGULAR MEETINGS. 

Board called to order by City Clerk, 1 

Convention for qualifications of members of City Government, 1 
John T.Clark elected chairman, 1 
Address of chairman. 1 

Notice to Common Council of organization of Board of Alder- 
men, 1 
Notice from Common Council of its organization, 1 
Convention for election of City Clerk. 2 
Mondays, 4 P. M., assigned for regular -weekly meetings, 2 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 

Annexation — 

Brookline — representation of city in support, 151 
Appropriations — 

Annual Appropriations, discussion, 165; Discussion and 
orders passed, 189 

$10,000, for extension of Commonwealth Ave., set apart, 206 

For curb for Tremont St. Mall, set apart, 240 

City's share of revenue from Liquor licenses to reduction of 
city debt. 262 

For Collector's Department, 453 

Order passed to report if unexpended balances can be trans- 
ferred to Paving, 516 

$6,800 for Eastern Ave. Wharf, 517 

$6,900 for Park Dep't, 529 

Report on additional Paving appropriation, 665 
Appropriations — additional 

$116.85 for elevator in City Hall, 189 

Kequest for $30.00u for Atlantic Ave.. 279 

$3,064 for South Hoston Court-room, 337 

$6,000 ior Vegetable Market. 466 

$6,000 for Mercantile Wharf Market, 479 

$3,100 to Tremont St. Mall Curb, 532 

$2,500 Mount Hope Cemetery, 762 
Appropriations — transfers — 

$a0u to Common Council Contingent Fund, 46 

$2,000 to Police Station House, Ward 16, 34, 48 

$25,000 to Overseers of Poor. 83, 111 

$5,0U0 to Newbury St. School-house, 111 

$9,000 to Columbus Ave. Extension, 122 

$19.2«6.44 to School Expenses, 166, 193 

$22,831.88 from widening Hanover St.. and $7,168.12 from 
Reserved Fund, to extension of Atlantic Ave., 295 

$10,000 to Police Station-house No. 8. 295, 332 

Police, $5,000 lor pursuing criminals, 309, 321, 332 

$2,000 for improvement of Orchard Park, 319, 333 

$5,000 additional to 17th June, 323 

$30,000 to Northampton St. District, 350 

$28,500 to Suffolk St. District. 398 

$10,000 for dredging Koxbury Canal, etc., 421 

$12,000 for Mercantile Wharf Market. 421 

$33,887.78 to Collector's Department, 454 



$1,000 to Auditor's Department, 454 
$1,000 to Treasury Depaitment, 454 
*100 to Lamp Department, tools, 455 
$1,100 for Glover Statue, 465 
Police. $1,300 for Badges, etc.. 467, 479 
Ferries, sundry items for repairs, 495 
Reg. Voters, $*65.09 to Assessors' Sheets, 516 
Common, sundry items. 559 
$64.46 for widening Leverett Street, 559 
$400 for repairs wagon, etc.. Inspection Buildings, 560 
$5,500 for rebuilding Commercial Point Bridge, 582 
$1,500 for repairs of Station Houses, 598 
$5,000 to Northampton St. District, 644 
$3,000 to New Engine Houses, 644 
$8,500 to Suffolk St. District, 665 
$50,000 for Paving. 680 

Board of Health — $1,000 to Evergreen Cemetery, 685 
" $1,000 to Public Urinals, 685 

" " $1,000 to Printing, 685 

Public Buildings — $2,000 to new Heating Apparatus, 687 
Police— $500 to " Feeding Prisoners," 705 

" $3u0 to Horse and Carriage hire, 705 
Lamps — $10,000 to Castings, 724 

" $2,000 to Wrought-iron Work, 724 

" $6,000 to Gas Lanterns. 724 

" $100 to Committee's expenses, 724 
East Boston Ferries - $2,000 to Carpenters and Joiners 

works on boats, 724 
Common — $450 to Orchard Park. 725 
Water — $2,500 to Chestnut Hill Driveway, 733 
Common, etc. — $417.35 for concrete walks in Independence 

Square, 733 
Pauper Expenses — $800 to keeping Horse and repairs of 

Carriage, 752 
Pauper Expenses — $310.91 to new Steamboat, 752 
Water Works — $7,000 for Service Pipes. 763 

" " $1,000 for repairing Reservoirs, 763 

" " $500 for Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 763 

Common — $447 for horse, etc., Supt., 768 
Health — $200 for Advertising, 768 
Auditor of Accounts — 

Estimates for 1875-6 referred, 111 

Authorized to make closing transfers of appropriations, 111 

Explanations of Salaries in Auditor's Department, 166 

Order relating to Annual Report, 264 

Annual Report, 393 

Baggage — see Unclaimed Baggage. 
Ballast Lighters — 

Quarterly Reports of Inspector, 4, 192, 394 

Communication from Com. on Harbor, referred, 224 

Ordinance passed, 293 
Bells — see Clocks 
Bigelow (Alderman) — remarks: on 

Age of policemen on appointment, 67 

Public Parks, 84 



IV 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



Swett St. Extension, 147 

South Boston Railroad, 189 

Annual Appropriations. 190 

System of Keeping city's accounts, 194 

Board of Education. 2'22 

Salaries of Constables in District Courts, 226 

Seventeenth of June, 263 

Street sweeping-machines, 265 

Fourth of July, 348 

Car tracks in Court, Devonshire and State Sts., 380, 440 

Collecting new market rents, 449 

Paving Bedford Street. 518 

Salaries of Deputy Collectors. 528, 562 

Car tracks in Columbus Avenue. 577 

Mystic contract for East Boston water supply, 577 

Division of Wards. 580 

Exhibition of Cardiff Giant, 5S3 

House Offal. 6J0 

Swing Signs and Awnings, 645, 681 

Appropriation for Maps, etc., for Centennial, 686, 703 

Salaries of Constables, 711 

Protection of life at Jamaica Pond, 725 

Water supply for Brighton and West Roxbury, 742 

Employment for the l'oor, 753 

Church St. District, right of way, 755 

Fees of Deputy Collectors, 765 

Birds — 

C. G. and F. H. Brackett authorized to take nests, etc., 193 

Board of Education — 

Resolution and discussion, 209 

Resolve passed, expedient to apply for authority to ap- 
point, 221 

Order discussed and passed directing Legislative Committee 
to ask for Act, 221 

Discussion, and concurrence in amendment, 269 

Board of Health — see Health, Board of 

Bonds — 

Order passed to pay Francis A. Hall three gold coupons, 46 

Certificate of indebtedness to John GiLon, authorized, 49 

Release to Alexander Dickson, 209 
Bonds of city officers — 

Annual examination. 334 

Report of Examination accepted, 423 

Of City Treasurer approved, 436 

Of Collector approved, 436 
Boston, Hartford and Erie R. R. — 

Leave granted to construct abutment at crossing of Dor- 
Chester Ave.. 356 
Boston and Northwestern R. R.— 

Hearing on location and terminus, 318 

Report accepted, location approved, 375 
Boston and Providence R. R. Co. — 

Authorized to change grade of South St., and rebuild Stony 
Brook Culvert. 375 

Order passed relating to Rogers Ave. R. R Crossing, 424 
Boston, Revere Beach and Lynn R. R. — 

Bond for laud damages, 294 

Discussion, and order passed relating to bond, 346 

Report, and hearing appointed, 454 

Hearing and order passed assessing damages, 493, 597 
Boston Typographical Union — 

Peimit for convention in Common Council Chamber, 294; 
thanks received, 452 
Bridges — 

Annual reports of Superintendents. 4. 7, 13 

Cambridge, annual report of Commissioner, 48 

Charles River, order passed to contract for repairs, 112 

Chelsea and Winthrop, order passed to contract for repairs, 
112 

Albany St., order passed to close for repairs, 137 

Broadway, order passed for repainting, 168 

engines authorized for draw, 250 

Order for plans and estimates for West Chester Park 
bridges, 293 

Permit to Fitchburg R. R. Co. to erect building, 308 

Prison Point, orders passed to close and repair, 265 

Warren, order passed to repair, 269 

Chelsea, order passed to repair, 269, 297 

order passed to close, 298 

Charles River, order passed to pave, 297 

order passed to close, 2J8, 451 

West Chester Park, permit from Railroad Commissioners, 
308 

Mt. Washington Ave., replanking, 310 

Chelsea, $500 additional for repairs, 334 

Maiden, order passed to contract for building, 373; to close, 
451 

Meridian, order passed to contract for rebuilding draw and 
repairing piers, 373; closed, 455 

Albany St., order passed to repair, 440 

Broadway, repair of roadway, 448 

Albany Street, closed, 517 

Mt. Washington, orders passed to close and repair, 532 

Commercial Point, appropriation for rebuilding, 582 

Arsenal Bridge, order passed to pay Messrs. Knox &Angier, 
610 



637 



Report on Back Bay Bridges, 623 

Discussion on Back Bay Bridges and order passed, i 

Tenean Bridge, closed for repairs, 647 

Report relating to Eastern Ave. Bridge, 647; recommitted, 
656 ; report. 688 

Broadway, closed for repairs, 6S7 

Congress St., named, and office of Superintendent established, 
705 

Mt. Washington Ave., building Superintendent's office 
authorized. 734 

Federal St., order passed to repair, 764 

Eastern Ave., discussion on naming, 6S8 
Buildings — 

Order passed to report rules for moving, 21 

Rules to regulate moving, reported and adopted, 33 

Annual report of Inspector, 34 

$2 000 allowed for clerical assistance, 92 

Inspector allowed use of horse and vehicle, 393 

Committee authorized to issue permits during summer re- 
cess, 423 

Order passed to examine egress from public buildings, 431 
Burrage (Alderman) — remarks: on 

The Park question, 15. 69, 96, 191 

Additional Water Supply. 36, 173 

Order to contract with Brookline Gaslight Co., 45 

Age of policemen on appointment, 67 

Widening School Street. 95 

New City Charter. 127, 133 

Fire Inspector, 146 

Annual Appropriations, 166, 180 

Supplies for Public Institutions, 169, 195 

South Boston Bailroad, 189, 194 

System of keeping city's accounts, 194 

Allowance for Decoration Day, 204 

Board of Education. 209, 221 

Salaries of Constables in District Courts, 226 

Brighton Betterments, 241 

New Vegetable Markets, 249, 266 

Seventeenth of June. 262, 2o8, 322 

Street sweeping machines, 265 

Board of Education, 269 

Boston, Revere Beach and Lynn R. R., 294 

Railroad obstructions in East Boston, 296 

Fourth of July. 319, 348 

Water Supply" for Wards 17 and 19, 320 

School-house at City Point, 34 ■( 

Wood pavement in Court St., 357 

Suffolk-st. District Claims. 377 

Car Tracks in Court, State and Devonshire Sts., 378, 394, 
413. 435, 457 

Dredging Roxbury Canal, 395, 421 

Back Hay Improvement, 398, 498 

Lafayette Square. 431 

Fence on Common, 432, 498, 508, 532 

Duties of City Registrar. 444 

Reports from License Commissioners, 444 

Collecting new market rents, 449, 456 

Regulation of hacks, etc . 478 

Madison Square appropriation, 499 

Paving Bedford Street, 518 

Census Statistics, 518 

Salaries of Deputy Collectors, 528, 562 

Employment of criminals, 529 

Public School system, 531 

Removal of swing signs, 534, 563 

Removal of bay windows, 535 

Car-tracks in Court Street, 563 

Car-tracks in Columbus Avenue, 577 

Water supply to East Boston. 577 

Vacancies in Mystic Water Board, 578 

Division of Wards. 579, 586, 605 

Exhibition of Cardiff Giant, 583 

Pay of City laborers. 601 

Additional Court room. 609 

School St. widening. 620, 640 

Car-tracks on Court St., 624 

Pay of Lamplighters, 623 

Division of Wards, 636 

Back Bay Bridges, 637 

House Offal, 640, 685 

Swing Signs and Awnings, 644, 667, 681 

Truant School and Small-pox Hospital, 659 

Taxes of John Jeffries. Jr., 682, 736 

Naming Eastern Ave. Bridge, 688 

Appropriation for Maps, etc., for Centennial, 703 

Salaries of Constables, 7U8 

Office hours in City Departments, 712 

City Charter, 719 

Railroad tracks in East Boston, 723 

Protection of life at Jamaica Pond, 725 

Swett St., 734a 

Water supply for Brighton and West Roxbury, 742 

Employment for the Boor, 753 

Church St. District, right of way, 755 

City Hospital. Homoeopathic treatment, 757 

Small-pox Hospital, 762 

Fees of Deputy Collectors, 765 

Veto of order to pay Deputy Collectors, 772 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



Cambridge Railroad — 

Additional tracks on Leverctt Street, granted, 494 
Cemeteries — 

Cedar Grove, Annual report, 321 

Mt. Hope, animal report, 333 
Census, and Division of Wards — 

Report in part, and order passed relating to census, 22 

Discussion on. 29 

" and amended order passed, 37 

" and concurrence on 35 Wards, 122 

Report relating to agents for taking census, 208 

Order passed to employ agents, 22i) 

Agents for taking census confirmed, 239, 261, 292, 307, 318, 
332, 393 

Enumeration of statistics approved, 261 

Order passed relating to statistics, 293 

Committee instructed to prepare wclieme for 24 wards, 376 

Report of Census aggregates referred, 452 

Report of enumerators referred, with instructions, 465 

Report on obtaining and publishing statistics, 4*2; order re- 
jected, 49-1 ; reconsideration discussed and refused, 518 

Compensation for taking the census, 490. 534 

Report on division of Wards. 579; discussion, amendments 
proposed and ordered to be printed, 584 

Discussion on Wards, amendments adopted, ordinance 
passed, and order to print, 604 

Order passed relating to polling places, 610 

Report on Printing expenses, etc., and order passed, 623 

Order passed to pay bdl of Sampson, Davenport & Co., 647 

Orders parsed establishing Ward Rooms, etc., 633 

New ordinance, with amendments, discussed, and passed, 
633 

Ordinance in relation to Breed's Island, passed, 687 
Centennial Celebrations — 

Invitation to attend Lexington and Concord Celebration ac- 
cepted, 67 

Entertainment of President Grant, 171, 204 

Order passed for observance 19th April, 193 

Order passed to place lights in steeple of old North Church, 
April IS, 196 

Bunker Hill, report and discussion on celebrating, 207 

Police detachment authorized to go to Concord and Lexing. 
ton, 207 

Order passed to close F. H. Market, April 19th. 208 

Seventeenth of Juno, discussion on appropriation, and order 
passed, 220 

Committee for Seventeenth of June, 240, 262, 2S8 

Seventeenth of June, closing streets, and making seats 
secure. 334. 351 

Votes of thanks to Gen. Francis A. Osborn, and Brevet 

Maj. Gen. Richard Arnold. 356 

order passed to print memorial volume, 336 

Church St. District — 

Discussion on right of way to Lowell estate, 754; Order 
rejected, 762 
City Accounts — 

Order discussed and passed relating to system of keeping 
city accounts, 194; report, 333 
City Architect — 

Continuance of office, and appropriation, 310 

Expediency of requiring officials to employ, 319 

Report relating to establishing the office, 647; recommitted, 
656; report, 688; Ordinance passed, 736 
City Charter — 

Draft referred to joint Special Committee, 1 

Order to print document prepared for Commission, referred, 
31 ; pissed, 59 

Report of Committee, 124 

Printing 1,000 of committee's report ordered, 126 

Discussion on few Charter, 126 

Resolutions offered and discussed, 128; adopted, 135, 13? 

Substitute resolutions offered and discussed, 134; rejected, 
133 

Reference to Committee of Whole, 136; consideration in 
Com. of Whole, and reports, 136, 152, 171, 173, 174, 196, 
201, 208, 153, 174 

Discussion and order passed, 242 

Discussion, reference to next City Government, 717 
City Clerk — 

Quarterly report, 36, 263, 447. 622 
City Collector —see Treasury Department. 
City Council — 

The official report, 333; order instructing committee dis- 
cussed and indefinitely postponed, 373; report on peti- 
tions accepted, 421 
City Engineer — 

Authorized to purchase supplies, 34 

Annual report, 59 
City Hospital — 

Bequest from Miss Mary L. Shaw, 188, 264 

Annual report, 420 

Report on Homoeopathic Department, 734; discussion, 757 
City Officers (elected or appointed) — 

Mayor's Clerk, 4 

Assistant City Clerk, 4 

Directors of East Boston Ferries, 19 

Trustees of Mount Hope, 19 

Cochituate Water Board, 19, 423 



City Messenger, 31 ; Assistants, 93, 337 

Trustees of Public Library, 31, 559 

Directors of Public Institutions, 31, 174, 204, 222, 240, 262, 
310, 358, 373 

Members of < 'ochituate Water Board, 31, 46, 59, 81, 143, 222 

Trustees of City Hospital, 31, 174, 204 

Assessors, 31 

Clerk of Committees, 31, 647; assistant, 683 

Superintendent of Bridges, 37 

First Assistant Assessors, 33, 59 

Undertakers, 58 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. 58, 92, 451, 507 

Inspectors and Weighers of Hay, 58, 393, 436, 451 

Surveyors of Marble, etc., 58 

Inspectors of Petroleum and Coal Oils, 58 

Supt. of Lamps, 58 

Supt. of Faneuil Hall, 58 

Supt. of Faneuil Hall Market, 58 

Inspector of Milk, 58 

Supts. of Hay Scales, 58 

Measurer of Gram. 58 

Inspectors of Provisions; 58, 163 

Registrar of Voters, 58 

Supt. of Wagons and Trucks, 58 

Supt. of Hacks and Carriages, 58 

Supt. of Intelligence Offices, 58, 66 

Supt. of Pawnbrokers, 53, 66 

Supt. Streets, 59 

City Surveyor, 59 

Harbor Master, 59 

Supt. Common and Public Grounds, 59 

Supt. Public Buildings, 60 

Supt. Sewers. 60 

Supt. Public Lands. 60 

Commissioner on Cedar Grove Cemetery, 60, 204 

City Solicitor, 60 

City Engineer, 60 

Water Registrar. 60 

Constables, 6i>, 338 

Second Assistant Assessors, 66 

City Registrar, 81 

Supts. of Bridges, 37, 81 

Commissioners on Cambridge Bridges, 92 

Weighers and Inspectors of Lighters, 93, 122, 150 

Weighers of Coal, etc.. Ill, 201, 239, 278, 292, 318, 345, 393, 
436, 451, 507, 527, 547 

Overseers of the Poor, 150. 548, 578 

Member of Board of Health, 163 

Fire Commissioner, 174 

Directors of East Boston Ferries, 174 

Trustees of Public Library, 189, 529 

Sealers of Weights and Measures, 201, 263 

Commissioner of Sinking Funds, 204 

Inspector of Lime, 2)5 

Culler of Hoops and Staves, 205 

Field Drivers and Pound Keepers, 205, 350 

Fence Viewers, 205 

Measurers of Upper Leather. 220, 527 

License Commissioners. 267, 500 

Auditor of Accounts, 308 

Treasurer, 336 

Collector, 356, 393 

Park Commissioners, 393 

Record Commissioners, 410 

Public Weighers, 292, 318, 410, 451, 465, 478, 703 
City Registrar — 

Quarterly report, 36, 279, 436, 596 

Amended order passed relating to burial permits, 293 

Annual report. 2J4 

Order passed for report on manner of conducting depart- 
ment, 393 

Majority report substituted, and order passed, 393 

Order passed providing standing committee, 410 

Standing Committee appointed, 431 

Discussion on duties, reconsideration refused, 442 
City Scales — 

Quarterly report North Scales, 46, 263, 622 

Assistant at North Scales authorized, 434 

Quarterly report South Seal , 447 
City Solicitor — see Law Department. 
City Stables — 

Order passed to set apart land in Charlestown, 83 

Order passed for erection on Childs street, Ward 17, 220 

Offal shed on Highland St., 332 

On Canal St., Charlestown, authorized, 376 
City Surveyor — 

Annual report, 19 

Authorized to purchase supplies, 29 
City Treasurer — see Treasury Department. 
Claims — 

Payment of executions or judgments authorized, 21 

$500 allowed for copying Charlestown records, 224 

Notice of claim to land front of estate of Stephen Smith, 465 

Order passed to pay $600 to Mary Noonan, 581 

Discussion and order passed relative to claim of Wm. Bt 
Chaplin, 723 

Order to pay Standard Laundry Machine Co., laid on table, 
775 



VI 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



Clark (Alderman) — elected chairman, 1; remarks: on 
The Park Question, 15, 64. 72. 100 
Additional Water Supply, 36 
Redivision of the Wards, 38, 588, 634 
■ Swett St. Extension, 148. 412. 432. 774 

Salaries of Constables in District Courts, 226 
Brighton Betterments, 241 
Boston, Revere Beach and Lynn R. It.. 3-16 
Back Hay Improvement, 398, 416, 4S1, 496, 516 
Fei.ce on Common, 419, 509 
Madison Square appropriation, 499 
School St. widening. 640 
Resignation of Clerk of Committees, 642 
Swing Signs and Awnings, 64 '» 
Truant School and Small-pox Hospital, 661 
Taxes of John Jeffries, Jr., 6S2, 737 
Salaries of Constables, 710 
Swett St., 734a 

Response to resolution of thanks, 778 
Clerk of Committees — 

Resignation of James M. Bugbee. 596 

Report on resignation of Mr. Bugbee, resolves and orders 

passed, 642 
Clocks — 

Order passed to ring bell of Maverick Congregational Soc, 

188 
Amended order concurred in to place clock on Central Sq. 222 
Committees — see pocket edition of organization of City Gov- 
ernment. 
Committees, special — 

On proposed Statue of Josiah Quincy, 410 
Common and Public Grounds — 
$1,500 tor labor, etc., Ill 
$2u0 for tools and repairs. Ill 
$10,000 for labor and keeping in order, 206 
$250 for grass and seeds, 206 
$1,500 for hiring teams, 206 

$2,500 for improvement near Jamaica Pond, 206 
$200 for tools and repairs near Jamaica Pond, 206 
$500 for trees and shrubs, 2U6 
$1,000 for water and wittering streets, 206 
$l,65'i for care of Blackstone, Franklin, Worcester, and 

Lowell Squares and Union Park, 206 
$900 for care of public grounds and trees in East Boston, 206 
$900 for manure, 206 
$l,5no for sods. 206 
$1,500 fur loam, 206 
$6,000 for red gravel, 206 
$500 for trees and shrubs, 230 
$100 for tools and repairs, 280 
$1,000 for repairing fences, fountains, etc., 298 
$5,000 for plants, 298 
$10,000 for labor, 355 
$1.5U0 for team work, etc., 355 
$1,000 for plants, 355 
$500 for mowing machines, 355 
$5,000 for Madison Square. 431 
$1.0u0 for settees and other seats, 431 
$228 for rustic flower-stands, 431 
$195.56 for fountain on Independence Sq , 431 
$650 for concrete walks, 431 
$400 fur sods, 431 
$8,000 for labor. 455 
$500 for team work, 437 

$7,000 for superintendence and labor. 498. 500, 559 
$3,000 fur Madison Square, 498, 500, 559 
$1,300 for Bromley Park, 498, 500, 559 
$2,000 for Orchard Park, 559 
$1,000 for watering, streets. 733 
$500 for repairs offences and fountains. 755 
Orchard Park, report inexpedient to purchase estates, 206 
Ordinance passed relating to peddlers, etc., 207 
Discussion, and amended order passed for fence to Common, 

418; amendment receded. 432 
Order passed for concerts, 431 
Permits granted to remove trees, 455, 582, 734. 763 
Report and discussion on fence and curb on Tremont Street 

Mall. 498; discussion and amended order passed, 507 
Discussion on appropriation for Madison Square, 4i,8 
Sundry transfers, 498, 50o, 550 

Repot ton Square on Commonwealth Ave. referred, 597 
Order p issed relative to preservation of trees on Tremont 

St. Mall. 624 
Lot adjoining Park Sq. placed in charge of Committee, 635 
Report accepted, inexpedient on oft'er of Sidney B. Morse, 

704 
Order passed relative to protection of life at Jamaica Pond, 

725 
Common Council — 

Order for printing Journal referred, 19 
Report accepted, to discontinue printing Journal, 59 
Contingent Expenses — 

Chairman of Board of Aldermen authorized to approve 

bills. 22 
County of Suffolk — 

Order passed for revision of jury list, 5 

Jail Expenses, 19, 81, 150, 240, 308, 375, 436, 452, 516, 580. 684, 

752; reference to committee, 580; report accepted, 584 



Furniture for county buildings authorized, 29 
Furniture for new Court House, Roxbury District, 81 
Examination of prisons, and houses of detention, 323; re- 
port, 448, 776 
$500 for Sucial Law Library, 450 
Additional Court room, 456, 608 
Report on compensation of officers of Municipal Courts, 

665; discussion. 7e6, 741; amended order passed, 742 
Older passed to pay $1,000 to Social Law Library, 734b 
Indices to Suffolk Deeds fur 1876 authorized, 734b 
Report on New Court House, referred to next Board of 
Aldermen, 775 

Decoration Day — see G. A. R. 

Elections — (sec also Public Parks) — 
Warrant fur State Election, 549 
Warrants for Municipal election, 667 
Report on returns Slate (lection. 610. 618 
Reports on returns Municipal election, 732, 736 
Report on returns Ward officers, 763 

Ferries — 

Order passed to consider expediency of reducing tolls, 31 

Report accepted, inexpedient to reduce tolls, 81 

East Boston, annual report, 204 

Order passed for free use June 17, 296 

Communications from Directors, on new boat needed, 516 

Order passed to contract for new boat, 533 

Winnisimmet Ferry Co. allowed use of Slip, 534 
Fire Department — 

Ri ports of tires and alarms for Dec, 7; January, 47; Feb- 
ruary, 112; March, 2o4; April, 279; May, 349; June, 
420; July, 447; August, 473; Sept., 547; October, 622; 
November, 717 

$225 for phonographic report of inquest, 68 

Expediency of establishing office of Fire Marshal, 68; 
discussion, and order passed, 145 

Report of Committee on Fire Inspector. 126 

Better accommodations for Engine 6, 189, 437 

Report on Chemical Works. So. Boston, 437 

Order passed to purchase land on Harvard St. and erect 
engine house, 439 

Order passed to purchase land on Washington St., Ward 
15. and erect engine house, 439; reconsideration, laid ou 
table, 450; withdrawn, 456 

Inquiry relating to petroleum, 450 

Annual report, 478 

Report relating to Chemical Factory, referred, 560 

Order passed relating to telegraph in Chelsea. 683 

Report on Chauncy Page's building accepted, 688 
Fort Hill Improvement — 

Unfinished business referred to Committee on Streets, 33 
Fourth of July — 

Orders for celebration. 297 

Committee and appropriation, 308; non-concurrence, 308, 
319. 348; conference, 3)1 ; concurrence, 358 
Funds — (see also Sinking Funds) — 

Franklin Fund, order passed for examination of accounts, 
20; report of examination, 32 

Pierce Fuel Fund, Charlestown — order passed to pay in- 
terest, 48 

G.A.I?.— 

Invitation accepted, Thomas G. Stephenson Post, 189 
Invitation accepted, Charles Russell Lowell Post 7, 192 
Discussion on allowance for Decoration Day, and order 

passed, 204 
Invitation accepted to attend presentation of colors to 5th 

Maryland Reg , 349 
Invitation accepted to attend lecture by Col. Spates, 5th 

Maryland Reg., July 4, 375 
Gas — 

Order relating to appointment of Commissioners, 8 
Order passed to appoint commission to investigate, 13 
Discussion on, and amended order passed to contract with 

Brookline Gaslight Co.. 45 
Communication from Brookline Gaslight Co., discussion and 

order passed to contract, 60 
Compensation of commission authorized, 145 
Commissioners to investigate appointed. 188 
Order passed relating to coal tar at north end, 753 
Glover Statue — see Mayor. 

Hack Rules and Orders — 

Report from Committee on Licenses, 406; amendments 

offered, 478; amended rules and orders passed, 495 
Harbor — 

Order passed to keep ship channel free from ice, 19 

Order passed relating to jurisdiction, 598 
Harris (Alderman) — remarks: on 

Uniting Cochituate and Mystic Water Boards, 59,93 

Gaslight for Brighton, 60 

Public Parks, 65, by, 72. 96 

New City Charter, 130, 245 

Fire Inspector, 146 

Swett St. Extension. 149, 734b, 774 

Renumbering Washington St., 150 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



VII 



Annual Appropriations, 189 

Additional water supply, 171 

Allowance for Decoration Day, 204 

Bunker Hill Centennial. 207 

Board of Education, 2U9. 221 

Salaries of Constables in District Courts, 223 

Seventeenth of June. 262, 322 

Street sweeping-machines, 2'i5 

Claim of.Pliine.iS E. Gay, 293 

Railroad obstructions in East Boston, 295 

Permit to Fitchbnrg 11 It. Co. to build on bridge, 303 

Boston, Revere 15 each & Lynn R.R., 346 

Fourth of July, 319 

Official Report, 374 

Car tracks in State. Devonshire and Court Streets, 379, 415 

Back bay Improvement, 396 

Engine House, Ward 15, 439 

Duties of City Registrar, 443 

Thompson Square, 444 

Salaries of Deputy Collectors, 528, 562 

Removal of Swing Signs, 534 

Removal of liay Windows, 535 

Mystic contract for East Boston water supply, 577 

Claim of Mary Noonan, 581 

Additional court room. 608 

House Offal, 640. 085 

Truant School and Small-pox Hospital, 660, 762 

Taxes of John Jeffries, Jr., 6S2 

Naming Eastern Ave. Bridge. 689 

Salaries of Constables, 705, 731 

Claim of Wm. B. Chaplin, 723 

Protection of life at Jamaica 1'ond, 725 

Licensing Plumbers, 740 

Water supply for West Roxbury and Brighton, 742 

Church St. District, right of way, 754 
Health, Board of— 

Annual lieport, 447 

Report B nevolent Fraternity of Churches, 752 
Health Department — 

Superintendent authorized to purchase supplies, 21 

Order passed to consider act relating to inspectors of Pro- 
visions. 125 

Contract of house offal, East Boston, 126 

Report accepted, expedient to accept Act, for appointment 
of Inspectors of Provisions, and Act accepted, 152 

Order passed to report concerning pay of laborers, 535 

Leave to establish free hospital for women. 560 

Discussion on House Offal, and amended order passed, 639; 
amendment, concurrence, 658; report and discussion, 
order passed, 685; concurrence, 704. 

Orders passed relating to Undertakers' fees, 704, 739, 768 
Highland R. Co. — 

Order of notice to raise track and pave at junction of Guild 
Row, Washington and Dudley Sts., 549 

Hearing on Tracks in Columbus avenue, 574 

Lamp Department — 

Annual report of Superintendent. 8 

Superintendent authorized to make purchases, 45 

Order passed to pay lamplighters in Boston. South Boston 

and Kast Boston two cents per lamp per night, 67 
Report on Bartleti's Lanterns, 547 
Repot ton pay of Charlestown lamplighters, 547 
Remonstrance from lamplighters, and hearing, 558 
Orders passed relative to pay of lamplighters, 623 

Law Department — 

Report on additional assistance, 22 

Law books for City Solicitor's office authorized, 29 

Discussion on. and order passed to appoint Fourth Assistant 

Solicitor, 30 
Semi-annual Report of Solicitor, 420 

Licenses — 

Report accepted, leave to withdraw, on Palais Royal Theatre, 

465 
Discussion on license to exhibit Cardiff Giant, 583 

Liquor Licenses — 

Orders passed relating to License Commissioners, 208 
Report on revenue, 240 

Order passed relating to fees and clerk-hire, 269 
Discu.-sion on, and Older lor reports indefinitely postponed, 

444 
Report of Commissioners, 684 

Loans — 

"Street Improvement Loan, Swett St.," order passed to 

borrow .-§-170.000, 48 
Additional Supply of Water, $1.5(10,000 authorized, 34, 36 
$100,000 for water-pipes, Waids 17 and 19, 203 
$2.0. 11,100 in anticipation of taxes. 321, 332 
Report on Mystic Water Works Loan, 437; order passed, 

440 
$267,ou0 for Back Bay streets, and avenues, 516 

Markets — 

Quarterly report of Superintendent, 31, 294, 436 

Assistant to Superintendent of F H. Market authorized, 83 

Report on new vegetable markets, discussion, and order 

passed authorizing, 248 
Order passed to lease stands, 250; amendment, 410 



Discussion, and order passed relating to Vegetable Market, 
266 

Order passed to rescind previous order to establish market. 
260 

Order passed relating to Vegetable Market. 438 

Order for assigning stands discussed and laid on table, 449; 
amended and passed, 406 

Lease of Quincy Hall, 767 
Mayor — 

Disposition of Topics in Inaugural Address, referred, 1 

Copy of Address requested for publication, 4 

Report on disposition of topics in Inaugural Address, and 
orders passed. 8 

Authorized to petition for authority to regulate transporta- 
tion of explosive substances, 733 
Mayor, — communications from — 

Announcing death of City Treasurer. 12 

Relating to horse-car blockade, 45; referred to Committee 
on Paving, 45 

Transmitting invitation to Lexington and Concord Centen- 
nial, 67 

Compensation for Gas Commission, 145 

Bequest from Miss Mary L. Shaw, 188 

Relating to monument at Yorktown, Va.,373; report, 687; 
order passed. 703 

Relating to proposed statue of Josiah Quincy, 410; report, 
561; order passed, and committee appointed, 577 

Relating to enforcement of Liquor Law, 435 

Relating to statue of General Glover, 558; report and orders 
passed. 597 

Relating to death of Hon. Henry Wilson, 655 

Relating to Maps, etc., for the Centennial Exhibition, 656; 
referred to Special Committee, 656; report, 686; dis- 
cussion, 6S6, 703; indefinite postponement, 742 

Veto of order to pay Dep. Collectors, 772 
Metropolitan R. Co. — 

Petition for additi mal tracks, 92 

Hearing on locations in Washington, Milk, and Hawley 
Streets, 163 

Temporary track on Boylston Street, 255 

Hearing on Columbus Avenue track. 307 

Hearing on Court Street tracks, 34.3 ; order passed to remove, 
358; reconsideration and recommittal, 377; report and 
discussion. 394; discussion and rejection, 413; reconsid- 
eration, 434. 4-10 

Order passed to pave Washington Street, from Waltham to 
Chester Square, 357 

39th location granted, 410 

Location in Columbus Ave. and Park Square granted, 433 

Location accepted, 436 

Paving Court Street, 447 

Report and hearing appointed on turnout tracks, 455 

Report and new hearing on Court Street tracks appointed, 
456; hearing, and motion to grant petition rejected, 490; 
order 10 discontinue use of tracks, 493; substitute order, 
563; diseus.-ion, order rejected. 624 

Order of notice to raise track and pave at junction of Guild 
Row, Washington and Dudley Sts., 549 
Middlesex R. Co. — 

Petitions for permanent location in State St.. etc., 164 

Hearing 0:1 location in Summer, Lincoln, and Beach 
Streets, 201 

Location granted for turnout tracks, 241 

Location accepted, 263 

Order passed for extension of location. 333 

Hearing on State and Devonshire Street tracks. 345; order 
passed to remove, 358; reconsideration and recommittal, 
377; report and discussion, 314; discussion and rejection, 
413: reconsideration, 434, 440; hearing, 446; report ac 
cepted. leave to withdraw, 455 

Seventh location accepted, 355 

Order passed to pave Charles River Avenue, 439 
Militia — 

Second Bat. Inf., invitation to ball accepted, 35 

Co. C. Fourth Bat. Inf.. order passed to pay $55 rent for 
temporary armory. 59 

Ninth Keg., Report accepted, leave to withdraw on regi- 
mental armory, 125 

Co. K, Kir.-t Reg. li.f , report accepted, leave to withdraw 
on repairs, 125 

Co. E. Ninth Reg. Inf., discontinuance of rent, 125; $1,000 
for rent, 126 

Co. A, First Keg. Inf., $75 for rent of armory, 125 

Co. 1), Fourth Bat. Inf., order passed to hire armory. 125: 
rent discontinued, 126; order passed to fit up and furnish 
armory. 107 

Co. C, Fourth Bat. Inf , discussion on, and order passed for 
armory on Hancock St.. Ward 16. 169 

Co. E. Ninth Reg. Inf.. $1,000 for rent rescinded, and 3t550 
allowed. 224 

Co. C, Njnth Reg:, $300 for armory, 240 

Co. A, Fifth Reg , $250 for armory. 240 

Co. (i, Ninth Reg., $200 for armory. 240 

Co. I), Fourth Bat. Inf.. armory approved, 250 

Co. A. Ninth Keg , $250 for armory, 250 

Co. I, Ninth Reg., rent discontinued. 346; Armory corner 
Washington and Harvard Streets. 346 

Co. A, First Reg. Inf., $75 for rent, 356 



VIII 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



Order passed to hire additional room corner Harvard and 
Washington Streets, 396 

Co. E. Ninth Reg., rent discontinued, 396 

Co. D, Ninth Reg., rent discontinued, 396 

Co. A, First Keg., $300 for rent of armory, 467 

Co. E, Ninth Reg., $260 for armory. 479 

Report accepted, leave to withdraw, on petition of Ninth 
Reg., 479 

Return of order from Common Council requested, 482; re- 
ceived, and hiring room on Harvard St. rescinded, 494 

Co. J, Ninth Reg., $300 for rent of armory, 495 

Co. E, Ninth Keg.. $137.50 for rent of armory. 495 

$500 for rent of drill shed of Inst, of Tech., 49 j 

Order passed relative to target practice, 549 

Fifth Reg., headquarters transferred, 581 

First Reg. Inf.. Armory leased, 666 

Co. E, Ninth Keg., fitting up Armory, 666 

Co. Q-. First Reg. Inf., rent discontinued, 775; Armory ap- 
proved, 775 

Co. I, Ninth Reg. Inf., Armory approved, 775 

Co.E, " " " " " 775 

Co. D, " " " " " 775 

Minors — 

License Rules established, 20 

Order passed to consider expediency of prohibiting attend- 
ance at Theatres, etc., 126 
Municipal Register — 

Order passed for printing, 4 

Report on supplying School Committee, accepted, 62 

New York and N. E. R. R. Co. — 

Order passed for gates on Dudley St. crossing, 704 

Northampton Street District — 

Report of work done, and orders assessing betterments, and 

to provide means for completing improvements, 61 
Committee authorized to assume betterments, 92 
Report accepted, no further action necessary relating to sur- 
render of estates, 151; communication from Solicitor, 
151 
Betterments apportioned, 204 
Report on surrender of estates, 21)4 
Committee authorized to settle grade damages, 220 
Resolve and order to take estates, laid on table. 220 
Land of John E. Fitzgerald and others, 310, 337 
Order passed to take land of Alvin O. Bartlett. 478 
Notice to quit to occupants of 84 Village St , 479 
Order passed to pay Alvin G. Bartlett, $7,786.30, 598 
Request for additional appropriation, 638 
Order passed for sale of land on Fellows St.. 638 
Orders passed to vacate assessments for raising grade, 764 

Nuisances — 

Petition relating to Roxbury Channel, 349 

O'Brien (Alderman) — remarks: on 

Age of policemen on appointment, 67 

Public Parks, 70, 98 

Widening School street, 94 

New City Charier. 127, 129, 243 

Supplies for Public Institutions, 169 

Armory on Hancock street, Ward 16, 170 

Appropriation for seventeenth of June, 221 

Salaries of Constables in District Courts, 226 

New vegetable Markets, 243 

Convention of Typographical Union in City Hall, 294 

Fourth of July, 319, 348 

Seventeenth of June, 323 

Claim ot J. E. Fitzgerald, 337 

School-house at City Point, 318 

Official report, 374 

Suffolk-street District claims, 377 

Back Bay Improvement, 418 

Fence on Common, 419, 508 

Engine House, Ward 15, 439 

Duties ot City Registrar, 442 

Reports from License Commissioners, 445 

East Boston High School, 513 

Paving Bedford St., 518 

Census Statistics, 518 

Employment of Criminals, 529 

Public School System, 530 

Salaries of Deputy Collectors, 563 

Claim of Mary Noonan, 581 

Exhibition of Cardiff Giant, 583 

Pay of City laborers, 601 

Division of Wards, 606 

Unpaid laborers on Sewers, 611 

School St. widening. 620, 640 

Car-tracks on Court St., 624 

House Offal, 640 

Truant School and Small-pox Hospital, 659, 762 

Maps, etc., for Centennial, 703 

Salaries of Constables, 707, 742 

Licensing Plumbers, 740 

Protection of laborers in City Contracts, 755 

City Hospital, Homoeopathic treatment, 759 

Fees of Deputy Collectors, 766 

Veto of order to pay Deputy Collectors, 773 



Omnibuses — 

Hearing on East Cambridge omnibus route, 47; report ac- 
cepted, leave to withdraw. 48 

Order passed relative to route of East Cambridge coaches, 
83 
Ordinances — 

Report and order passed to petition relative to driving cattle 
through streets. 639 

Report relating to office hours in Departments, 639; recom- 
mitted. 656; report, 688; discussion, 712; ordinance 
passed, 736 
Overseers of Poor— » 

Quarterly report, 46, 279. 447, 622 

Resignation of Joseph Buckley, 93 

Annual Report, 349 

Communication from Mayor, on death of Dr. Allen, 527 

Order passed relating to employment for poor; report, 705 
and orders passed, 753 

Pay of Laborers in City employ — 

Order referred to Salary Committee, 111 

Amended order passed to consider expediency of changing 
rate, 240; report, 297 

Discussion on resolve, 598 
Police — 

Quarterly reports of Chief, 4, 192, 420, 531 

Annual report of Chief, 8 

Orders passed relative to horses, supplies, and repairs, 21 

Portion of annual report of Chief, relating to station-house 
lodgers, referred to Committee on Ordinances, 31 

Station Eleven, order passed to provide furniture, etc., 34 

( irder passed to amend section 50 of Police Rules, 66 

Discussion on maximum age on appointment. 66 

Report accepted permitting Police Relief Association to ap- 
ply for incorporation, 112 

Order passed to pay for repairs of police steamboat, 126 

Order passed for increase of Police Force, 240 

Report of Police Charitable Fund. 263 

Station 8, renort to raise building, 2so 

Report relating to Police Relief Fund, 297 

Ordinance passed to extend Police Charitable Fund, 308 

Order passed relating to pay of officers at Concord and Lex- 
ington, 3)5 

Expediency of Board of Management, 562 

Report on Police Commission, 768 
Pope (Alderman) — remarks: On 

Annual Appropriations, 189 

Permit to Fitchhursr R. R. Co. to build on bridge, 308 

Claim of J. E. Fitzgerald, 337 

Engine House, Ward 15, 439 
Power (Alderman ) — remarks : on 

The Park question, 15, 63, 69, 84, 97, 191 

Post Office Square, 20 

Redivision of the Wards, 30, 123, 5S0, 589 

The Law Department, 30 

Order to contract with Brookline Gaslight Company, 46, 61 

The Salary Bill. 59 

Age of policemen on appointment, 66 

Boston's system of Sewerage, 82, 113 

Widening School street, 94, 111 

New City Charter, 126, 129, 242 

Fire Inspector, 146 

Renumbering Washington Street, 150 

Purchase of street sweeping-machines, 164 

Annual Appropriations, 166, 189 

Supplies fur Public Institutions, 169 

Additional water supply, 171 

South Boston Railroad, 188, 195 

System of keeping city's accounts, 194 

Allowance for Decoration Day, 204 

Bunker Hill Centennial, 207 

Appropriation for Seventeenth of June, 220 

Board of Education. 209, 221 

Salaries of Constables in District Courts, 225 

Brighton betterments, 241 

New Vegetable Markets. 249 

Seventeenth of June. 262, 322 

Street sweeping-machines, 265 

Claim of Phineas E. Gay. 293 

Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R. R., 294, 346 

Railroad Obstructions in East Boston, 296 

Fourth of July, 319. 348 

Electing Directors for Public Institutions, 321 

Public Bath on Cragie's Bridge, 332 

School house at City Point. 346 

Wood Pavement in Court Street, 357 

Official report. 374 

Suffolk-street District claims, 376 

Car-tracks in Court, State and Devonshire Streets, 377, 394, 
415, 434. 440, 457 

Dredging Roxbury Canal, 395, 421 

Back Bay Improvement, 397, 416, 480, 496, 516 

Swett-street District, 431 

Fence on Common, 418, 432, 498, 508 

Lafayette Square. 430 

Reports from License Commissioners, 444 

Duties of City Registrar, 444 

Regulation of Hacks, etc., 478 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



IX 



Madison Sq. Appropriation, 498, 500 
Eas", Boston High School, 515 

£a aries of Deputy Collectors, 517, 527, 562 * 

Paving Bedford St , 518 
Census Statistics, 518 
Employment of Criminals, 529 
Public School System, 531 
Car Tracks in Columbus avenue, 577 
Licensing Plumbers, etc., 577 
Vacancies in Mystic Water Board, 573 
Claim of Mary Noonan. 581 
Exhibition of Cardiff Giant, 583 
Pay of city laborers, 5y8 
Additional Court room. 609 
Unpaid laborers on sewers. 610 
School St. widening, 620, 640 
Car tracks in Court St., 624 
Pay of lamplighters. 6J.'i 
Back Bay bridges, 637 
House offal. 63.', 685 

Resignation of Clerk of Committees, 642 
Swing signs and awnings, 645, 681 
City Architect, 637 

Truant School and Small Pox Hospital, 659 
Naming Eastern Ave. Bridge, 6S9 
Maps, etc., for Centennial, 704 
Salaries of constables. 706, 731 
City Charter, 718 
Claim of Wm. B. Chaplin, 723 
Burning of Rice School-house, 734 
Claim of Mr Jeffries, 737 
Licensing plumbers, 740 
Resolution of thanks to Chairman, 777 
Prescott (Alderman) — remarks : on 

The Park question, 15, 69. 83, 95, 191 

The Law Department, 31 

The horse-ear blockade, 45 

Order to contract with Brookline Gaslight Co., 46 

Boston's system of Sewerage, 82, 114 

Widening of School street, 111 

New City Charter. 127, 130, 245 

Fire Inspector. 116 

Swett Street extension, 148, 411, 431, 774 

Annual Appropriations, 165, 189 

Supplies for Public Institutions, 169, 195 

Additional Water Supplies, 173 

South Boston Railroad, 188, 195 

Allowance for Decoration Day, 204 

Bunker Hill Centennial, 207 

Appropriation for Seventeenth of June, 220 

Board of Education, 209, 221 

Brighton betterments. 241 

New Vegetable Markets. 249, 268 

Seventeenth of June, 262 

Board of Education, 270 

Convention of Typographical Union in City Hall, 294 

Fourth of July Celebration. 308, 348 

Claim of J. E. Fitzgerald. 337 

School-house at City Point. 317 

Wood Pavement in Court Street, 358 

Official reports. 374 

Car tracks in Court, State and Devonshire Streets, 377, 394, 

413, 434. 441, 456 
Back Bay Improvement, 417 
Engine House, Ward 15, 439, 456 
Duties of City Registrar, 442 
Reports from License Commissioners, 444 
Collecting new market rents, 449, 456 
Vacancy in Board Trustees Public Library, 452 
Fence on Tremont-st. Mall. 498 
Madison Sq. Appropriation. 499, 500 
East Boston High School, 510 
Paving Bedford St., 518 
Public School System, 531 
Removal of Bay Windows, 534 
Salaries of Deputy Collectors, 563 
Car Tracks in Court Street. 563 
Removal of Swing Signs. 564 
Car Tracks in Columbus avenue, 577 
Division of Wards, 579, 585, 605 
Resignation of Clerk of Committees, 596, 641 
Pay of city laborers, 601 
Additional Court room, 608 
School St. widening, 621, 640 
Tracks in Court St., 621 
Division of Wards, 635 
House offal, 640, 685 
City Architect, 657 

Truant School and Small-pox Hospital, 65S, 762 
Salaries of constables, 709 
Office hours in City Departments, 712 
City Charter, 719 
Claim of Wm. B. Chaplin, 723 
Swett St., 733 

Burning of Rice School-house, 734 
Licensing plumbers, 740 
City Hosp'tal, homoeopathic treatment, 758 
Fees of Deputy Collectors, 766 



Resolution of thanks to Chairman, 777 
Printing — 

Annual reports authorized in print, 2 

Fourth report of Supt.. 68 

Order passed to print 5 030 License Law. 293 

Order passed to print 10,(100 Public Park Act, 293 

Report accepted, inexpedient to reprint index to City Docu- 
ments, 5S6 

Report and order passed to print report of Sewerage Com- 
mission. 76S 
Protection of laborers in contracts with the city — 

Report, recommitted, 623; reports, 706, 736; discussion, and 
order rejected, 755 

Public Baths — 

Order passed authorizing repairs, etc., 22 
Repair and maintenance, 310 
On Cragie Bridge, indefinitely postponed, 232 
Annual report, 76J 

Public Buildings — 

Annual report of Supt., 19 

Repairs and cleaning authorized, 29 

Faneuil Hall, order passed to strengthen floor and roof, 293 

Order passed to sell Engine House, Parker Street, 349 

City Hall, location of sundry offices, 438 

order passed for watch clock and fixttir. s, 439 

Order passed to purchase land on Mt. Vernon St , W. Rox- 

bury, and erect Engine House. 493, 516 
Order passed for procuring Ward Rooms, 534 
Enlargment of Suffolk Jail. 550 
Wardroom and armory. Ward 12. 561 
Order passed relative to safety of egress, 717 

Public Institutions — 

Request of Directors for changes in ordinance, referred. 8 
Report of Committee on Ordinances, and ordinance to 

amend, 112 
Order passed to consider expediency of Rules as to build- 
ings. 163 
Discussion on ordinance relating to supplies, 168 
Special Committee to investigate convict labor, 183 
Order passed relative to supplies, 195 
Report on erection or repairs of buildings, 264 
Report and ordinance relating to purchase of supplies re- 
committed with instructions, 303 
Annnal report of Hirectors, 334 

Ordinance passed relative to contracts for buildings. 337 
Order passed to refer annual report to committee, 351 
Communications relating to outfit and enlarging berth for 

new steamer, referred, 46"i 
Order passed to repair Wharf at Deer Island. 495 
Eastern Ave. Wharf, order passed for alterations, 495. 517 
Order passed for fitting up and furnishing steamboat. 495 
Order for Committee to report on Report of Director*, 516 
Report and discussion on employment of criminals, sub- 
stitute order passed, 529 
Sale of Steamer Henry Morrison, 559 
Report relating to amendments of statutes, 647: order 

passed, 656 
Discussion and order passed relating to Truant School and 

Small-pox Hospital, 658 
Private sale of Steamer Henry Morrison authorized, 665; 

referred, 681; order passed to sell, 752 
Discussion, and order for small-pox Hospital rejected, 762 

Public Lands — 

Annual report of Supt., 15 

Order to cancel agreement with Michael Geraghty. 223, 240 

Straightening division line between lands of city and Joseph 

Dorr. 309 
Site for Warren Statue, cor. of Warren and Regent Streets, 

319 
Orders passed relative to Boston University, 336. 423 
Order passed relating to Swett Street Hospital lot, 423 
Deed to Henry R. Plmipton authorized, 466 
Order passed to take Lot 7. Newbury St., 479 
Order passed for Collector to cancel Bond No. 2349. 478 

" " '• " " 2463, 478 

Deeds authorized to J. J. McNutt. 548 

Orders passed relative to land and bond of Jos. E. Billings, 723 

Public Library — 

Order passed to print proceedings at dedication of Dorches- 
ter Branch Library. 31 

Offer of West Roxbury Free Library, 46 

Report accented, inexpedient to print proceedings at dedi- 
cation of Brighton Branch Library, 81 

Annual report, 436 

Inquiry relating to vacancy in Board Trustees, 450; commu 
nication respecting same referred, 452 

Public Parks — 

Order requesting Mayor to petition, 9 

Discussion on, 15. 62 

Discussion, amendments acted on, and order rejected, 69 

Motion to reconsider vote rejecting order made, discussed, 

and specially assigned, 83 
Discussion and order passed to petition. 95 
Discussion, and amended order passed in concurrence, 191 
Order passed for special election, 297 
Committee to examine returns, 337 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



Report on returns of votes, accepted, 351 

Order na-ised to provide for clerical services, etc., 478 

Ordar passed to provide room for Commissioners, 478 

Quincy (Alderman) — remarks: on 

Post Office Square. 20 

Census and re-division of Wards, 22, 29, 37, 123. 570, 584, 604 

The Law Department. 30 

Uniting Cochituate and Mystic Water Boards, 59, 92 

Public' Parks. 6:i, 63, 101, 191 

Age of policemen on appointment, 67 

Establishing office of Fire Marshal, 68, 145 

Widening School Street, 95 

Pay of Laborers in city employ. 111 

New City Charter, 126, 128. 247 

Supplies for Public Institution, 108 

Armory on Hancock Street, vVard 16, 169 

Additional Water Supply, 172 

Reorganization of School Committee, 209 

Salaries of Constables in District Courts, 226 

Seventeenth of June, 262, 323 

Board of Education, 269 

Official report, 374 

Suffolk-street District Claims, 377 

Back Bay Impiovement, 398, 415, 481, 497 

Swett-street District, 411, 432 

Fence on Common. 419, 432, 49*, 507 

Car-tracks on State, Court and Devonshire Streets, 434, 441 

Duties of ( ity Registrar, 442 

Keports fiom License Commissioners, 444 

Militia target practice, 549 

Census Statistics. 5 8 

Removal of Bay Windows, 535 

Car Tracks in Columbus avenue, 577 

Claim of Mary Noonan, 581 

Exhibition of'Cardiff Giant, 583 

Pay of city laborers, 604 

Car tracks on Court St., 624 

Division of Wards. 633 

School St widening, 641 

City Architect, 057 

Taxes of John Jeffries. Jr., 682 

Naming Eastern Ave. Bridge. 6S8 

Salaries of constables. 708 

Office hours in City Depaitments, 712 

City Charter. 717 

Protection of life at Jamaica Pond, 725 

Claim of Mr. Jeffries, 737 

Licensing plumbers, 740 

Church St. District, right of way, 755 

Protection of laborers in city contracts, 755 

Small pox Hospital, 762 

Fees ot Deputy Collectors, 765 

Veto of order to pay Deputy Collectors, 773 
Quincy Statue — See Mayor. 

Railroad tracks in East Boston — 

Special Committee appointed to confer, 658; report and order 
passed. 723 
Record Commission — 

Report, and order passed to establish, 293 

Ordinance passed, 393 
Rewards — 

$1,000 for arrest of murderer of Mrs. Margaret E. Bingham, 
153 

$500 for information concerning John Dennehy. 278 

$5C0 for securing murderer of Thomas P. Pulsifer, 666 
Rules and Orders — 

Of last Board of Aldermen, adopted, with amendment, 4 

Report of joint Special t'ommittee, 15 

Of City Council for 1875, established, 19 

Salaries — (see also Pay of Laborers) — 
Report of Committee on Salaries, 49 
Discussion on Salary Bill, and orders passed, 58 
Of Fourth Assistant Solicitor fixed at $2,500, 59 
Report on Salaries of License Commissioners, 223; order 

passed, 240 
Discussion, reconsideration, and recommittal of order re- 
lating to salaries of Constables in District Courts, 225 
Report on Salaries of Treasurer, Collector, and Auditor, 

295; salaries established, 308 
Schools — ( see also Board of Education) — 
Repairs authorized, 29 
Report accepted, inexpedient to purchase additional land for 

Cbapman School yard, 81 
Laboratory authorized in Roxbury High School-house, 111 
Report accepted, inexpedient on Bigelow District, 113 
Gymnasium authorized for Latin School, 122 
Request for Schools for Girls like licensed minors, referred, 

222 
Order passed to purchase land adjoining Chapman yard, 

262 
Order passed for additional accommodations for Auburn 

Primary School, Brighton, 262 
Order passed to fit up school for Deaf Mutes on Washington 

Street, 262 



Primary School, corner Main and Haverhill Streets, Charles- 
town, 309 
Primary School-house, Francis Street, 310 
Report on site at City Point, 334; discussion and order 

passed, 346 
Order passed to purchase land on Dorchester Ave., 355 
Report, room for Master of Adams School, 393 
Order passed to enlarge yard of Quincy School-house, 393 
Accommodation in Minot and Brighton Districts, 396 
Bowditch, order passed to fit up laboratory. 431 
Order passed to purchase sue for Florence District, 444 
Expediency of accommodations for Kindergarten, 4-14 
Reports accepted inexpedient to provide schools for licensed 

female minors, and kindergarten, 463 
Order passed to consider expediency of furnishing accom- 
modations for drill-room in High School, Charlestown 
Dist., 495 
Discussion on East Boston High, non-concurrence on substi- 
tute order to establish, 510 
Cabot St. bath-house for evening school, 516 
Discussion on Public School System and order passed to 

erect school-house on Ashland St., 530 
Report accepted, inexpedient to purchase land for Eliot 

High School, 559 
Accommodations for Dorchester-Everett District, 559 
Accommodations in Andrew District, 578 
Report on School for special instruction referred to School 

Committee, 582 
Report on Sewing in Public Schools, 582 
Order passed relative to sewing, 623 
Requests from the School Committee referred, 637 
Order passed to provide for Free Evening Drawing School, 

West Roxbury District, 717 
Primary School, Lowell District, 717 

'• Curtis St. District, 717 
'• " Comins District, 717 

Orders passed to investigate cause of fires in Rice and 
Phillips School-houses, 734; repairs authorized, 734; tem- 
porary accommodations for Rice School, 734 
$525 for use of armory by Charlestown High School. 762 
Accommodations on Applet on St. for Rice School, 763 
Reports on school-house at City Point, order passed, 766 
Order passed to provide drill room for Chailestown High 

School, 767 
Rice and Phillips, report on origin of fire, 767 
Rice, order passed to repair, 768 
Reports and references to next School Board, 767 
Seventeenth of June — See Centennial Celebrations. 
Sewers — 

Sewer in Mystic Valley, see Water. 

Annual report of Superintendent, 31 

Order passed to petition for change in mode of making 

sewer assessments, 68 
Discussion, and order passed for commission to examine 

Boston's system of sewerage, 82, 102 
Discussion and order rejected relative to Commission on 

Sewerage, 113 
Appointment of Commission, 122 
Order passed to consider expediency of amendment relating 

to assessments, 223 
Order of notice passed to W. R. Chester and others, 223 
Order passed to take lands on Amory and Boylston Streets, 

268 
Order passed to reconstruct in Everett Street, 355 
Order passed to construct drain for surface water in Sanford 

and Forest Hills Streets, 35 j 
Report and discussion on Dredging Roxbury Canal and 

Charles River Flats 395; order passed, 42b 
Ordinance passed changing basis of assessments, 431 
Order authorizing deposits for claims, referred, 500 
Vale St., right to discharge sewer, 562 
Orders to take land and construct in King St., £97 
Stony Brook, order passed to construct new culvert, 610 
Hearing and discussion on unpaid laborers, 610 
Order to construct in Curtis St., West Rox , 623 

Park Street, Charlestown, 192 
" " Schuyler and Maple Streets, 248 

•' " Warwick Street, 248 

'• " Edgewood Street. 248 

'• " Wall Street, Charlestown, 264 

" " Fellowes and East Lenox Streets, 263 

" " Centre Street; in Amory Street; east 

of B. & P. R. R. to Boylston Street; in Boylston Street; 
in Boylston Ave., 279 
Order to construct in Common Street, 297 
" '• Alaska Street, 297 

" " Cherry Street, 297 

" " Orchard Street, 309 

" " Meridian Street, 322 

" " Ashburton Place, 322 

" •' Warren Street. 322 

" " Highland Street, 322 

" " Savin, Tupelo, and Quincy Streets, 322 

" '• Howard and Gerard Streets, 334 

" " Berkeley Street, 356 

" " Paris Street, 375 

" " Norfolk Ave., 422 

" " Humphrey Street, 422 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



xr 



Order to construct in Berkeley Ave.. 422 

" " Hamlet Street, 422 

" '• Boston Street, 422 

'• " Hancock Street, 422 

" " Albright Court, 422 

" " Sumner Street, 422 

" " Kverett Ave., 422 

" " Brngdon Street. 422 

" " Notre Dame Street, 422 

" Washington Street, 422 

" " Townsend Street. 422 

" " Codman Park. 422 

" " < 'obden Street. 422 

" " Walnut Ave., 422 

" " Westminster Ave., 422 

" " Walnut Park, 422 

" " Egleston Sauare, 422 

" " Weld Ave , 422 

" " Marvin Street, 422 

" " Dorcnester Ave., and take land, 422 

" ,; l.angdon Street, 438 

" " Rutl.md Square, 438 

" •' Jess Street, 44$ 

" " Athens Street, 418 

" '• Silver Street, 448 

" " Thornley street. 456 

'• " Bowen Street. 456 

" " Harrison Avenue, 456 

" " AVoodville Square, 456 

" " Blue-Hill Ave., 467 

" " Woodbine St., 467 

" " Warren St.. 467 

" " Bremen St'. 467 

•' Fifth St., 467 

" " Q St., 4t>7 

" " Saleni-st. Ave., 480 

<• " Maverick St., 495 

" '• Wabon St., 495 

'• " Rosjin St., 495 

" '■ Bo vision St., 517. 532 

" •' l.ainartine St.. ;'.32 

" »' Spring-park St., 532 

" " Troy St.. 548 

" " Terrace St., 580 

'• " New Heath St., 580 

'• " Mnywood St , 580 

" " Clinton St., 580 

" " Maynard St., 62J— 

" " Hayward Place, 623 

" " " '• 637 

" " Tyler St., 637 

" " Bow St., Charlestown, 637 

" " Richmond St., 644 

Sinking Funds — 

Annual report of Commissioners, 31 
Soup for the Poor — 

$300 additional appropriated, 147 
Report from Chief of Police, 192 
Amended order passed, 719 
South Boston Railroad Co. — 
Location accepted, 7 

Hearing on location on Milk, Washington, and Arch Sts., 122 
Report on location on Summer, Washington, and Hawley 

Streets, 168 
Discussion on eleventh location, 188 
Discussion on location, and order passed, 194 
Location accepted, 267 
Order indefinitely postponed, 444 
Soldiers' Relief- 
Quarterly report of Paymaster, 4, 222, 547 
State Aid — see Soldiers' Relief. 
Stebbins (Alderman)— Remarks: on 
Additional Water Supply, 35. 171 
Order to contract with Brookline Gaslight Co , 45, 60 
Supply of East Boston by Flax Pond Water Co., 46 
The Salary Bill, 58 

Uniting Cochituate and Mystic Water Boards, 50 
Public Parks, 63, 69, 101 
Age of Policemen on appointment, 66 
Widening School Street, 95 
Commission on Sewerage, 113 

Census, and redivision of Wards, 124, 5T0, 586, 606. 037 
New City Charter, 126, 129 
Fire Inspector, 145 
Annual Appropriations, 165, 190 
System of keeping city's accounts, 194 
So. Bosion Railroad, 194 
Allowance for Decoration Day, 204 
Bunker-Hill Centennial, 207 
Appropriation for Seventeenth of June, 220 
Board of Education, 209, 222 

Election of members of Cochituate Water Board, 222 
Salaries of Constables in District Courts, 225 
Brighton, betterments, 241 
Seventeenth of June, 262, 268 
Board of Education. 263 
Claim of Phineas E. Gay, 293 
Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R. R , 294, 346 



Duties of City Registrar. 293 

Railroad obstructions in East Boston, 29i 

Water Supply for Wards 17 and 19, 320 

Claim of J. E Fitzgerald, 337 

Suffolk-street District claims, 376 

Back Pay Improvement, 417, 480, 438 

Collecting new market rents. 449 

Metropolitan tracks in Court St., 458, 493, 563 

Fence on the Common. 498, 50.1, 532 

East Boston High School, 516 

Salaries of Deputy Collectors, 517, 527. 565 

Census Statistics, 518 

Public School System, 531 

Removal of Swing Si^ns, 53 1 

Removal of Bay Windows, 535 

Car tracks in Columbus avenue, 577 

Mystic Contract for Boston Water Supply, 577 

Licensing Plumbers, etc., 578 

Change of contract system on Conduit. 578 

Vacancies in Mystic Water Board, 578 

Jail expenses, 580 

Pay of City laborers, 601 

Unpaid laborers on Sewers, 610 

School St. widening, 621 

Car-tracks in Court St , 624 

Pa3' of Lamplighters, 623 

Back Bay Bridges. 637 

House Offal, 640, 685 

Swing Sisrns and Awnings, 614, 667, 681 

City Architect, 657 

Truant School and Small-pox Hospital, 660 

'faxes of John Jeffrirs, Jr., 682, 736 

Naming Eastern Ave. Bridge, 689 

Salaries of Constables, 741 

City Charter, 719 

Railroad tracks in East. Boston, 724 

Water supply for West Koxbury and Brighton, 742 

Church St. District, right of way, 754 

City Hospital Homoeopathic treatment, 757 

Small-pox Hospital. 762 

Fees of Deputy Collectors, 765 
Str. et Commissioners — 

Annual report, 13 
Streets — 

Orders passed relative to ice on sidewalks, 15, 81 

Report accepted allowing removal cf four trees from 
Brown's avenue and Ashland street, 21 

Superintendent authorized to purchase supplies, set edge- 
stones, erect fences, number streets, grant permits to 
open streets, lay cross-walks and gutters. 29 

Orders passed for setting back fences on Tremont street, 
Ward 19, and Nos. 37 to 41 Hudson street, 33 

Committee on Streets authorized to refer claims to arbitra- 
tion, 33 

Order of notice to quit on Beach street, 33 
" " '• " Pleasant street, Charlestown, 37 

Report on use of streets for toasting (no power), accepted, 
49 

Annual report of Superintendent, 6S 

Order passed relating to snow and ice in front of tenement- 
houses, 113; ordinance passed, 410 

Purchase of street sweeping-machines, 164, 265, 321 

Orders of notice to quit on Hanover Ave., Hunneman St., 
and Bowdoin St.. 207 

Mayor and Com. on Streets authorized to settle city claims 
for Atlantic Ave. betterments, 207 

Report and discussion on revision of betterments in Brighton, 
241 ; hearing. 242 ; laid on table, 242 

Order passed relating to sprinkling unpaved streets. 263 

Order passed for removal of projecting signs, 279, :i33, 467 

Discussion, and order passed relating to railroad obstructions 
in East Boston. 296 

Oxnard Sugar refinery allowed to lay water pipe, 309 

Removal of trees authorized on Forest Street and Brighton 
Ave., 375 

Report on petition of Boston Water Power Co.. and discus- 
sion, 396; discussion, and recommittal with instructions. 
415; report, 480; discussed, and order amended and 
adopted, 436; report of Finance Com. and order passed, 
516 

Rebuilding wall on Comins School-house estate, 448 

Temporary tracks to Vegetable Market authorized, 449 

Temporary tracks to S wett St. authorized, 454 ; reconsidered 
and amended, 454 

Court Square closed for funeral of Barney Hull, 455 

Engineer to report on Milldam roadway, 455; report, 479 

Continental Sugar Refinery allowed to lay pipe, 456 

Order to pave sidewalks on Bromley Park, Parker, Bromley, 
Albeit and Old Heath Sts , 456 

Removal of tree from 738 Main St., Charlestown, 465 

Track across Foundry St. authorized, 494 

Order passed to purchase estate on Bowdoin St., Ward 16, 
507 

Discussion on removal of swinging signs; order rejected, 
534; report on remonstrance, 563; reconsideration, order 
passed, 563 

Discussion on removal of Bay Windows, and order passed, 
514 



XII 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



Release by Wm. Gaston, relating to Litchfield's Wharf, 649 
Order passed to raise area and repave at intersection of 

Washington and Dudley Sts., 549 
Order of noiice to quit on Carolina Avenue. 560 
Permit to lay steampipe acro?s Alden St.. 5G1 
l'ermit to lay iron pipe across A and through Baldwin St., 

501 
llevised grade of Warren and Main Sts , and Thompson 

Square, ft 81 
Order of notice to owners and abutters on Dorchester Ave., 

639 
Schoul St.. widening, discussion. 610 

Svvii g signs and awnings, heaiing of Chit f of Police, discus- 
sion, and older rejected, 644 
Order passsd relating to gate across Main St., at crossing of 

B. and L. It. It., 617 
Discussion on shade signs and awnings, 6C6. 681 
Street Musicians prohibited in certain streets, 705 
Order passed relative to re-opening passage-way from Court 

Square to School St , 717 
Telegraph posts authorized on Warren Bridge, etc., 722 
-Albion Court — changed to Albion Place, 762 
•Alford St. — Charlestown — cdgestoms, gutters, roadway, 

597 
-Alford grade established, 687 

- Auburn St. — order of notice to quit, 112 

• Arcadia St. — macadamizing, edgestones, etc., 308 
-Ashland — grading, 687 

Atherton St. — macadamizing, edgestones. etc., 30S 

- Athens St. — order passed to establish revised grade, 309 

- Auburn St. — order p::ssed to grade and pave, 376 
-Anthony PI. — named, 561 

-Bath St. — grade established, 734 

•Baxter St. — edgestones, gutters, sidewalks, roadway, 775 

- Beacon St. — order passed to sprinkle. 205 

- Bower St. — order passed to establish revised grade, 62 

- Brighton Ave. — order passed to sprinkle, 205 

- Brookline Ave. — order passed to sprinkle, 205 

- Berwick Park — order passed to build retaining wall. 241 

- Bowdoin St. — leave granted to Charles S. Keinhard to cut 

down two trees, 280 

- Berwick Park — edge.-tones and gutters, 298 

• Beethoven St. — macadamizing, edgestones, etc., 308 

- Bowdoin St. — order passed to establish revised grade, 309 

- Bowdoin St.— order passed to grade, 3;i5 

- Beach St. — order passed to grade and pave. 357 

- Berkeley St. — order passed to repair bridge, 376 

- Bow St., Charlestown — order passed to grade and pave, 434 

- Boston St. — order passed to grade and gravel, 447 

- Blanchard St. — named, 447 

- Bolton St. — edgestones, sidewalk, paving, 455 
-Blanchard St. — grading, edgestones, gutters, sidewalks, 494 
-Bowdoin St. — edgestones, sidewalks, gutters, 479 
-Bedford St. — discussion on pa\iug, and recommittal, 518; 

order passed, 533 
-Cary St and Tremont I'lace — grading, 753 

- Culvert St. — order passed to establish grade, 36 

- Court St. — order to pave with granite, 205 

- Cazenove Place — order passed to raise edgestones, and side- 

walks, pave gutters, macadamize roadway, and build 
cesspools, 298 

- Court St. — discussion on wood pavement and order passed, 

357 

- Corey St. — land damages, order passed to pay, 377 

- Cottage, Boston and Humphrey Sis. — order parsed to sprinkle, 

395 

- Corey St. — order passed to grade and gravel, 431 
-Charles River Ave. — order passed to pave between Com- 
mercial St. and City Sq., Charlestown, 434 

- Charles St. — order passed to furnish and set edgestones, pave 

sidewalks and gutters, and macadamize roadway, 434 
-Chelsea St. — sidewalks, 6S7 
-Circuit St. — edgestones, gutters and sidewalks. 722 

- Cabot St. — order passed for edgestones and gutters, 447 
-Court St. — paving between Court Sq. and Tremont St., 494 
-Columbus Ave. — edgestones and roadway, 517 

- Cross St. — order passed to pave, 517 

-Cortez St. — edgestones, sidewalks, gutters, roadway, 549 
-Culvert St. — established grade, 722 
-Clinton — filling dock, grading and gravelling. 687 
-Dorchester Ave. — edgestones, gutters, roadway, cesspools, 
455 

- Deacon St. — edgestones, gutters, roadway, 561 

- Dexter St. — grading, macadamizing, edgestones, gutters, 581 

- Dorchester Ave. — removal of tree, 581 

- Dale — grade established, 687 

-Dorchester Ave. — edgestones, sidewalks, roadway, 597 

- East Lenox St. — order of notice to '" quit." 223 

- Eliot St., Ward 17 — grade established, 241 

- Eliot Sq , Highland St., Washington St., and Walnut Ave. — 

order passed to sprinkle, 351 

- Eutaw St. — order passed to furnish and set edgestones. pave 

sidewalks and gutters, and macadamize roadway, 434 
-Elm St. — paving, 5J7 
-Friend St. — order passed to repave, 549 
-Fountain St. — grading, edgestones, gutters, roadways, 549 
-Faneuil Hall Sq. — paving, 597 
-Franklin St. — changed to Norfolk Ave., 734 



— Hanover Ave. — order passed to grade and pave, 376 

— Holyoke St. — retaining wall, 455 

— Harrison Ave. — edgestones, gutters, roadway, 533 

— Harvard Sq. — Charlestown — edgestones, roadway, gutters, 

sidewalks. 567 

— Huntington Ave. — order passed to remove tracks, 638; pav- 

ing and gravelling, 638 

— Heath place — order of notice to quit, 734b 

— High St. — Fort Hill Sq.. named, 722 

— Hyde Park Ave. — grading. 687 

— Havre St.— edgestones, gutters, 666 

— Hereford St. — gutters, crosswalks, roadway, 663 

— Hawthorn St. — grading, gravelling, 666 

— Knowlton St. — order passed to establish grade, 36 

— Leverett St. — order of notice to ■' quit," 112 

— Lewis St., East Boston — order passed to repave, 323 

— Lafayette Sq. — named. 307 ; hearing and recommittal. 393: 

report. 422; hearing and order passed restoring name of 
Thompson Square, 4"0 

— Leverett St. — order passed to grade and pave, 376 

— Lexington St. — order passed to furnish and set edgestones, 

and pave gutters, 433 

— London St. — order passed to furnish and set edgestones, and 

pave gutters and sidewalks, 433 

— Lawrence St. — sidewalks, 581 

— Lowland, Ninth, and Old Harbor Sts. — gravelling. 638 

— Laurel and Sherman — revised grade established, 687 

— Marion St. — sidewalk. 456 

— Mather St. —Ward 24— plank sidewalk, 704 

— Marion St. — grade established, 763 

— Mill St. — Ward 24 — purchase of land authorized, 762 

— Newbury St. — gutters, 455 

— North St. — order passed to pave. 439, 455 

— North Market St. — order for urinal rescinded, 516 

— Newcomb St. — grade, edgestones, gutters, sidewalk, 533 

— Norfolk Ave. — grading, gravelling, plankwalks, 775 

— North St. — paving, 597 

— North Centre St. — paving. 597 

— North Beacon St. — grade established and grading, 638 

— Orchard St. — macadamizing, edgestones, etc., 308 

— Oliver St. — order passed to widen. 360 

— O St. — edgestones gutters, sidewalks. 517 

— Old Hnrbor St. — edgestones, sidewalks, gutters, 638 

— Pembroke St. — sidewalks opp. St. Mark's Church, 188 

— Post Office Sq. — hearing on change of name, and reference 

to Committee on Paving, 15; report on change of name, 
leave to withdraw, accepted, 2o 

— Park Sq. and Columbus Ave. — order passed to sprinkle, 280 

— Pleasant St., Charlestown — order passed to grade, 376 

— Pearl St. — order passed to widen. 4-17 

— Pacific St. — grade, edgestoues,,sidewalks, gutters, 517 

— Pearl St. — edgestones gutters, sidewalks, roadway, 561, 562 

— Putnam Sq. — named, 666 

— Rrescott " '• 666 

— Princeton St. — sidewalks. 687 

— Rutland Sq. — order passed to grade, 423 

— Rockland St. — order passed to grade, 433 

— Kockland St. — retaining wall. 549 

— Reed Ct. — order passed to grade, 533 

— Rogers St. — edgestones. gutters, sidewalks, 687 

— Rockland and WalcullaSts. — grading, 753 

— School St. — communication from Street Commissioners, on 

widening, discussion and reference to Committee, 95, 111 ; 
discussion and indefinite postponement, 620 

— Shawmut Ave. — order passed to sundry people to ■■ quit," 167 

— South Market — order passed to renumber, 151 

— Savin Hill Ave. — plank sidewalk, 192; grading, macadam- 

izing, edgestones, gutters, 455 

— Swett St. — report of Committee on Streets, accepted, and 

order passed for providing means, 34, -18; order laid on 
table that no action be taken, 112; discussion, and con- 
currence in amended order, 147; indefinite postpone- 
ment of order that no aciion be taken, 152; discussion, 
and order passed rescinding part of prior order. 411; 
discussion, and order passed Lo construct, 431; order of 
notice to quit, 438 

— Starr St. — order passed establishing grade, 112 

— Stoughion and Dudley Sts., Ward 16 — sprinkling. 203 

— St. Charles St. — order passed to raise edgestones and side- 

walks, pave gutters, macadamize roadway, and build 
cesspools, '^98 

— Sixth St. — edgestones and sidewalks, 298 

— !»h;\wmut Ave. — grading, edgestones, etc., 334, 447 



*prmg 



Bark Ave. —order passed to reconstruct culvert, 395 



- Silver St. — order passed to grade and gravel, and pave with 
wood, 431 

— Smith St. — order passed to giade, 431 

— Salem St. — order passed to pave, 439 

— Second St. — edgestones, gutters, sidewalks, 517 

— Seventh St.— edgestones. gutters, roadway, 549 

— Swett St. -Discussion and order passed relating to It. R. 

grade, 733; amended order passed, 774 

— Sixth St. —grading, 722 

— South St —order to widen indefinitely postponed, 773 

— Sawyer St. — sidewalk, 622 

■ — Thettord Ave. — plank sidewalk, 704 

— Terrace St. — grading. 722 

— Tremont St. — removal of iron posts, 597 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



XIII 



— ThoriiuiKu St. — order of notice to quit. 241 

— Thomas St — order passed to establish grade. 375 

— Troy St.— edgestones, gutters, sidewalks and road-way, 423 

— Tremont St. and Gore Ave. — order passed to grade, 439 

— Townsend St. — order passed to grade and macadamize, 447 

— Terrace St. — order passed to lay out, 532 
— Valentine St. — named. 561 

— Vale St. — payment to Ciioate Bnrnham, 562 

— Washington St. — remonstrance on renumbering, 92; discus- 

sion on. and order passed to renumber, 150 

— West Cottage St. — order passed to grade, 241 

— Walden St. — order passed to grade, 265 

— 'w„M ,\ve. — macadamizing, edgestones, etc., 308 

— Warren St. — edgestones and gutters. 433 

— Warren Place — grading, macadamizing, edgestones. gutter.-, 

447 
— Western Ave., Ward 19 — order passed to gravel, 518 

— West St. — order passed to repave, 494 

Washington St. — Paving between West St. and Norfolk PI., 

494 

— Washington St. — named Fort Hill Sq.. 722 

—Walk Hill St. — West Roxbury — grading, gravelling, 666 
Suri'olk-Strcet District — 

Committee on Northampton- Street District vested with 

powers for unsettled business, 37 
Order passed to remit taxes. 205 

Claim of Phineas E. Gay discussed and referred, 293; dis- 
cussion, and recommittal, 377; report and orders passed, 
398 



Taxes — 

Report on assessing tax on real estate devised to city by 
David Sears. 32; order passed to assume tax. 36 

Report relating to tax on Appleton Temporary Home, 32 

Order passed laying annual tax, 191 

Order passed to refund taxes to Trinity Church, 494 

Discussion on liability for unauthorized acts of city agents, 
682 

Hearing on claim of John Jeffries, Jr., 719; discussion, 733; 
report accepted, leave to withdraw, 736 
Treasury Department — 

Death of City Treasurer, 12 

Communication from City Solicitor, 12 

Charles H. Dennie appointed Treasurer pro tern., 12 

Order passed relating to selection of candidate, and increas- 
ing bonds, 12 

Order passed requiring bonds of Treasurer pro tern. ,12; 
bonds approved, 13 

Order passed for examination of accounts, 14 

Report and order relating to fees of Deputy Collectors, 32 

Order passed to petition for leave to establish salaries of 
Deputy Collectors, 36 

Report of examination of late Treasurer's accounts accepted, 
61 

Order passed to continue salary of late Treasurer to July 1, 
1S75, to widow, 61 

Order passed to veiify Treasurer's manuscripts, 66 

Order passed for examination of accounts of collectors, 94 

Order passed to charge extra clerk-hire to license revenue, 
250 

Order relating to Treasurer and Collector, 264 

Chapter 176 of Acts of 1875 accepted, 26S 

Order passed for Com. on Ordinances to consider amend- 
ments necessary, 279; report, 336 

Report on reorganization, and order passed. 346 

Report on Treasurer's account accepted, 356 

Ordinance passed relating to Collector's Department, 358 

Additional Safe authorized, 456 

Order passed relative to hours for Collector's Department, 
466 

Report on Salaries of Deputy Collectors, 517 ; discussed, and 
order rejected, 527; reconsideration, 528,562; amended 
order passed. 563 

Report of Unpaid Taxes, 532; accepted, 563 

Order passed relating to deposits of City Funds, 638; con- 
currence in amendment, 701 

Report on fees of Deputy Collectors, discussion and order 
passed, 761 

Order to pay Deputy Collectors vetoed, order rejected, 772 
"Trees — (see also Streets— also Common) — 

Reports leave to withdraw on petitions for removal, 68, 126 



Unclaimed Baggage — 

Sale by Fitchburg R. Co., 151 
Unfinished Business — 

Referred to joint standing committees, 4 
Of last year, referred to committees, 8 
Referred to the next City Council: — 

Request from Public Library relating to Bates Hall, 706 

Report on high-service water supply, 717 

City Charter. 717 

Loan for sewer in Mystic Valley, 733 

Report relating to vacancies in Mystic Water Board, 739 
Referred to next Board of Aldermen: — 

Order to regulate awnings, 742 

Report on New Court House, 775 

Business in hands of Committees, 777 



Vacation — 

Order passed for summer vacation, 433, 450 
Viles ( Alderman) — Remarks ■ on 

Annual Appropriations, 190 
Votes of Thanks — 

From Post 26, G. A. R., for civilities rendered, 382 

To Rev. James Freeman Clarke, for oration July 5th, 396 



Wards — division of, see Census. 

Ward officers appointed, 655, 680, 703, 717 

Ward 1 — 

Resignation of Warden, 36 

Ward 4 — 

Resignation of Clerk, 13 

Ward 10 — 

Resignation of Warden, 4 

Ward 11 — 

Resignation of Inspector, 19 

Ward 13 — 

Resignation of Inspector, 47 

Ward 14 — 

Resignation of Inspector, 13 

Ward 17 — 

Resignation of Inspector, 559 
Washington's Birthday — 

Order amended and passed for celebrating, 46 
Water — 

Request of Water Board for appropriation of $1,530,000, 4 

Order relating to supply of localities 2J0 feet above moan 
low water, referred, 13 

Report on request for $1,530,000 accepted, and referred to 
Finance Committee, 22 

Report and orders from Committee on Finance, providing 
$1,530,000, 34 

Discussion, amendments adopted, and order passed appro- 
priating $1,530,000, 36 

Offer from Fiax Pond Water Co., placed on file, 43 

Discussion and order passed relating to uniting Cochituate 
and Mystic Water Boards, 59, i)2 

Communications from Cochituate Water Board, asking 
aulhoiity to locate post hydrants. 151; asking appro- 
priation of $100,000 for pipe contracted, 151; requesting 
adequate provision for making of contracts, 151 

Report accepted, granting $100,000 and referred to Finance 
Com., 166 

Report on additional authority to contract, 166 

Discussion on additional supply, 171 

Rcoort from Finance Com. and order to borrow $100,000 for 
pipes Wards 17 and 19. 192 

Order passed authorizing post hydrants, 192 

Orders passed to report changes in system of high service 
works, 250, 279 

Proposition from Brookline Commissioners. 234 

Order passed relating to Mystic Storage Basin, 236 

Order passed relating to purity of Lake Cochituate, 308 

Expediency of new members for Mystic Water Board. 319 

Discussion, and order passed relative to supply to Wards 
17 and 19, 320 

Resignation of Thomas Gogin, 321, 333 

Minority report and ordinance passed in relation to Cochitu- 
ate and Mystic Water Boards 333; adherence, 349, 355; 
conference. 373; report, inability to agree, accepted, 432 

Report accepted inexpedient to require sureties to be resi- 
dents in State. 349 

Report on Mystic Sewer and Storage Basin, and order 
passed, 410 

Mystic Water Board, annual report, 420 

Report no action necessary to preserve purity of Lake 
Co jhituato. 431 

Orders passed for Sewer in Mystic Valley, and Loan, 446; 
referred to Com. on Water, with instructions, 465 

Annual report of Cochituate Water Board, 452 

Adjustment of Collector's accounts for East Boston, 549, 559 

Report accepted, no action necessary on notice from Marga- 
ret K. Cushman, 559 

Report on South Boston and Beacon Hill Reservoirs, and 
Licensing ['lumbers, 559 

Report and order relating to change of method of work on 
Sudbury Conduit, 560 ; order passed. 578 

Mystic contract for East Boston supply annulled, 577 

Order passed relating to control of pipes in buildings, 577 

Report and order relating to filling vacancies in Mystic 
Board laid on table, 578 

Permission to lay pipe across Mystic River. 598 

Report on high-service system authorized in print. 653 

Contract for pipes to be delivered next year authorized, 733 

Discussion on licensing Plumbers, non-concurrence, 739 

Discussion and amended orders passed relating to Water 
supply for West Roxbury and Brighton, 742 

Order passed to petition for protection of sources of supply, 
763 

Order for regulation of wat r fixtures referred to Committee 
on Ordinances with instructions, 763 
Weights and Measures — 

Order passed to sell horse, wagon, etc., 500 



XIV 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDKRMEN. 



Wilson, Henry — 

Communication from Mayor, resolution adopted, and order 
passed relating to death of, 655 

Worthington (Alderman) - remarks: on 
The Park question. 15, 63, 69, 99, 191 
Rcdivision of the Wards, 30, 37, 123, 579, 587, 607, 636 
The Law Department, 30 

Order to contract with Brookline Gaslight Co., 45. 60 
Uniting Cochituate and Mystic Water Boards. 59, 92 
Printing proceedings at dedication of Brighton Branch 

Library, 59 
Widening School Street, 94 
Order for non-action on Swett Street, 112 
Commission on Sewerage. 113 
New City Charter. 127, 129 
Fire Inspector. 146 
Swett Street Extension, 147 
Purchase of street sweeping-machines, 164 
Annual Appropriations, 165, 189 
Armory on Hancock Street. Ward 16, 169 
Additional Water Supply, 171 
System of keeping city's accounts, 194 
South Boston Railroad. 195 
Salaries of Constables in District Courts, 225 
Brighton, betterments, 241 
Seventeenth of June, 262, 268 
Street sweeping.machines, 265 
Vegetable Market, 266 
Board of Education, 269 
Duties of City Registrar, 293 
Fourth of July. 319, 348 
Water Supply for Wards 17 and 19, 320 
Electing Director for Public Institutions, 321 
Public Bath on Cragie's Bridge, 332 
Claim of J. E. Fitzgerald, 337 
Boston. Revere Beach and Lynn R. R., 346 
School-house at City Point. 347 
Wood Pavement in Court St., 357 
Official report, 373 

Back Bay Improvement, 397, 417, 481, 498 
Swett St. District, 411 
Fence on Common, 420, 498, 509, 532 



Lafayette Square, 430 

Car tracks on State. Court and Devonshire Sts.,434 

Regulation of hacks, etc., 478 

Madison Sq., Appropriation, 498, 500 

Salaries of Deputy Collectors. 528, 562 

Removal of Bay Windows. 535 

Car tracks in Columbus Avenue, 577 

Change of contract system on Conduit, 578 

Jail expenses, 580 

Claim of Mary Noonan, 581 

Exhibition of Cardiff Giant, C83 

Pay of city laborers. 603 

Unpaid laborers on sewers, 611 

School St. widening, 620 

Back Bay Bridges. 637 
House offal, 704, 685 

City Architect, 657 

Truant School and Small-pox Hospital, 658, 762 

Swing signs and awnings, 681 

Appropriation for maps, etc., for Centennial, 686 

Naming Eastern Ave. Bridge. 688 

Employment for poor, 705, 753 

City Charter, 718 

Claim of Wm. B. Chaplin, 723 

Railroad tracks in East Boston, 724 

Swett St., 733 

Burning of Rice School-house, 734 

Claim of Mr. Jeffries, 736 

Lite ising plumbers. 740 

Water supply for West Roxbury and Brighton, 742 

Church St. District, right of way, 754 

Fees of Deputy Collectors, 764 

Veto of order to pay Deputy Collectors, 772 

Paying Standard Laundry Machine Co., 775 



FINAL PROCEEDINGS. 

Resolution of Thanks to Chairman, 777 
Response of Chairman. 778 
Order passed to print final proceedings, 779 
Adjournment, sine die, 779 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



XV 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



ORGANIZATION AND REGULAR MEETINGS. 

Called to order by senior member, N. M. Morrison, 1 

Credentials of members received, and quorum reported, 1 

Notice to Mayor and Aldermen, of quorum present, 1 

Convention, and qualification of members, 1 

Halsey J. Boardman elected President, 1 

Address of President, 2 

"Washington P. Gregg elected Clerk, 2 

Oath of office administered to Clerk by City Solicitor. 2 

Notice to Board of Aldermen of organization of Common 

Council, 2 
Notice from Board of Aldermen of organization of that body, 2 
Thursday evenings, half-past seven o'clock, assigned for regular 

meetings, 3 

ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 

Anderson, Mr., Ward 3 — remarks : on 

Pay of laborers in employ of city, 106, 22S, 251, 542, 590 

Badges, 140 

Salaries of License Commissioners, 252 

Board of Education, 274 

Street sweeping-machines, 275, 324 

Fourth of July, 305 

Bath house, Cragie's Bridge, 325 

Enforcement of License Law, 401 

Vegetable Market, 407 

Division of Wards, 625 
Annexation — 

Order passed relating to Brookline, 153 
Appropriations — 

Report on Auditor's Estimates, 140 

Discussion on Appropriation Bill, and orders passed, 154; 
[see also action on Appropriation Bill, under head of 
" The Public Park," page 155. first column.] 

Discussion, and concurrence in amendments of Appropria- 
tion Bill, 198 

$10,01)0 unexpended for extension of Commonwealth Ave. 
set apart, 211 

$30,000 for centennial celebration, 17th June, 237 

Amended order passed to set apart $10,000 for edgestones, 
Tremont St. Mall, 237 

Revenue from Liquor Licenses, 289, 299 

$6,«00 for Park Dept., 525 

$6,8)0 for altering Easternave. Wharf, 551 
Appropriations — additional — 

Request for $5,000 for Newbury St. primary school-house, 91 

$3,400 for Tremont St. Mall Curb, 614 

$8,570 to Suffolk St. Dist , 72J 

$2.5»0 to Mt. Hope Cemetery. 715, 767 

$700 to Contingent Fund for aldermen, 768 
Appropriations — transfers — 

$500 to Contingent Fund of Common Council, 40 

$2,000 to Police Station House, Ward 16, 78 

$25,000 to Overseers of Poor, 106 

$5,000 to Primary School, Newbury St., 106 

$9,000 to Columbus Ave. Extension. 119 

$19,296.44 to School Expenses, School Committee, 196 

$33,500 to Suffolk-St. District. 313 

$22,831.88 and $7,168.12 to Atlantic Avenue, 313 

$10,000 to Police Station House, No. 8, 313 

$5,000 for pursuing and arresting criminals, 354 

$2,000 to Orchard Park, 354 

$30,000 to Northampton St. District, 366 

$12,000 for Vegetable Market, 425 

$10,0H0 for Roxbury Canal, 425 

$28,500 to Suffolk-St. District, 427 

Lamp Dept. — $100 for tools, 472 

$5,741.35 from Treasury Dept. to Collector's, 472 

$28,146.43 " Reserved Fund " " 472 

$1,000 " Sinking Fund " Auditor's salary, 472 

$1,000 " " ~ " " Treasurer's " 472 

Common, etc —$1,100 to Statue of Gen. Glover, 483 

$3,000 for Wharf at Doer Island, 501 

$4,500 " fitting out and furnishing Steamboat, 501 

Ferries — Sundry items for repairs, 501 

Police — $1,300 to Badges, etc., 502 

Request for report relating to transfers for benefit of unem 
ployed, 505 

$20,000 for new ferry-boat. 540 

$64.46 to widening Leverett St., 551 

$65.09 to Assessors' sheets, Reg. Voters, 551 

$400 to Repairs, Inspection of Buildings, 590 



$6,000 to Mercantile Wharf Market, 613 

$5,500 for rebuilding Commercial Point Bridge, 613 

$500 for Gen. Glover Statue, 625 

$1,500 to repairs of Station Houses, 625 

$.i,000 to Northampton St. Dist., 648 

$3,000 to new Kngine House, 648 

From unexpended balances to West Chester Park Bridges, 

678 
Police — $500 to " feeding prisoners," 726 
" $3n0 to horse and carriage hire, 726 
Water — $2,500 to Chestnut Hill Driveway, 726 
Public Building — $2,000 for new heating apparatus, 726 
$50,000 from Water Works to Paving, 726 
Board of Health — $1,000 to Evergreen Cemetery, 726 

" " $1,000 to Public Urinals, 726 

" " $1,000 to Printing, 726 

Common, $454 to Orchard Park. 750 
Lamps — $10,000 to castings, 750 

" $2,000 to wrought iron work, 750 

" $6,000 to gas lanterns, 750. 

'• $100 to Committee's expenses. 750 

Ferry — $2,000 to carpenter's and joiners works, 750 
Pauper Expenses — $800 to keeping horse, etc., 767 
•' " $310.91 -'new steamboat," 767 

Water Works — $7,000 for service pipes, 767 
Common —$447 horse for Supt . 767 
Health — $2J0 for advertising, 767 
Auditor of Accounts — 

Estimates for 1875-76 referred. 103 
Explanation of items in Appropriation Bill, 154 
Annual report in print authorized, 271 
Annual report, 383 

Badges — 

Order to procure, discussed, and indefinitely postponed, 23; 
new order to procure introduced, 26; discussed, 41; 
amended, 42; rejected, 41; motion to reconsider spe- 
cially assigned, 44; passed, 77; order amended and 
passed, 77 

Order to dispense with Badges discussed and indefinitely 
postponed, 27 

Discussion. 140; discussion, and order rejected, 161 
Ballast Lighters — 

Report on ordinance, 559; passed, 277 
Beal. Mr., Ward 16 — remarks : on 

Pay of laborers in city employ, 525. 591 
Bells — see Clocks. 
Board of Education — 

Discussion, and resolve and order passed, 273 
Board of Health — 

Letter of complaint, by Maria A. Lee, referred, 161 
Boardman, Halsey J., Ward 14 — elected President, 1 
Bonds — 

Order passed to pay Francis A. Hall three gold coupons, 40 
Bonds of City Officers — 

Special committee appointed to examine, 333 

Report of correctness accepted, 425 
Boston, Itevere Beach and Lynn R. R. Co. — 

Bond for Belcher's lane referred to Committee on Public 
Lands, 299 
Boston Typographical Union — 

Use of Council Chamber for convention, 276, 282 
Brackett, Mr.. Ward 10 — remarks: on 

Washington's Birthday, 40 

Redivision of Wards, 80, 109, 115, 554, 565 

Convict labor at House of Correction, 177 

Establishing Boston Water Board, 230 

Salaries of License Commissioners, 252 

Vegetable Market, 273, 407 

East Boston Murder, 291 

Appropriation for Park Commissioners, 502 

Pay of laborers in Health Dept., 542 

Licensing plumbers, 617 

City Charter, 674 

Claim of Standard Machine Co., 750 
Bridges — 

Annual reports of Superintendents, 5. 11, 16 

Order passed for construction of bridges over Boston & 
Albany R.K., 64S 

Congress St. office of Supt. established, 713 
Buildings — 

Assistance in Department for Survey, etc., authorized, 115 

Report accepted, revoking permit to move building to 
Madison Sq., 218 



XVI 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



TJse of horse allowed Inspector, 386 

Committee authorized to issue permits during recess, 425 
Order passed for examination of means of egress,428 ; report 
of inspector, 614 
Burditt, Mr., Ward 16 — remarks : on 
Armory in Ward 16, 13S 
international Typographical Union, 276 
Offal Shed, Ward 15, 315 
Vegetable Market, 4U7 
Swett Street Extension, 405 
Engine-house, Ward 16, 462 
Voling-placts in new Wards, 488 
Division of Wards, 557, 572, 630 
City architect, 668 

Cawley, Mr., Ward 2 — remarks: on 
Badges, 161 

Reward for arrest of murderer of Mrs. Bingham, 219, 290 
Petition of T. A. Splaine, 227 
Supplies for Public institutions. 301 
Offal Shod, Ward 16, 315 
Contracts for Sudbury Conduit, 317 
Park Commission', 428 
Licensing plumbers, 614 
Census, and .Division of Wards — 

Order passed to petition for authority, 23, 39 

Discussion on Kedivision of Wards, 79, 88 

Report in part, accepted, discussion, and order passed to 

amend petition, 108 
Reconsideration, discussion, substitute rejected, and amended 

order passed, 115 
Order passed relating to former statistics, 219 
Scheme to divide city into 24 Wards, 381 
Report of new Division of Wards, 537; discussion, 554 
Order for Committee to locate ward-rooms indefinitely post- 
poned, 546 
Petitions on Division of Wards, 565 
Discussion, amendments, and passage of New Division of 

Wards, 565 
Order passed relating to extra voting-places, 572 
Discussion on Wards, and amendments concurred in, 612 
Discussion and amended ordinance passed, 625 
Orders passed establishing voting-places in new Wards, 629; 

discussion, 630 
Order passed to pay bill of Sampson, Davenport & Co., 678 
Ordinance passed in relation to Breed's Island, 691 
Centennial Celebrations — 

Invitation to Lexington and Concord accepted, 76 
City Departments closed at noon, 19th April, 196 
Lights in Old North Steeple. April 18, 211 
Hospitalities to President Grunt, 199 
Invitation to Christ Church accepted, 211 
Appropriation for 17th ,)une, 234, 271, 324 
Committee for 17th June. 255, 271 
East Boston Ferry free of toil, June 17, 313 
17th June, extra police, 338 
Order passed to print memorial volume, 381 
Charlestown Records — see Claims. 
City Accounts — 

Discussion, and order passed for examination of system, 196; 

report accepted, 338 
City Architect — 

Order passed relating to employment of City Architect by all 

boards and committees, 316, 324 
Order passed to continue, 325 
Discussion, 668 

Ordinance passed to establish office, 744 
City Charter — 

Report of Commission referred to Joint Special Committee, 3 
Order for printing document prepared for Commissioners 

discussed and referred, 28 ; report in favor accepted, and 

order passed, 57 
Order passed for printing 1.000 reports of Committee, 138 
Resolves relating to new charter, 317 
Discussion, 631, 649, 669 

Discussion, and resolves and orders adopted, 695 
Referred to next City Council, 731 
Resolves relating to tenure of office indefinitely postponed, 

731 
City Council — 

Official report, order passed to advertise, 327; discussion 

on, and order passed, 368; report of Printing Committee 

accepted, 425 
City Documents — 

Order passed for binding Documents and Proceedings, 769 
City Engineer — 

Authorized to make purchases, 51 
Annual report, 57 
City Hospital — Bequest of Mary L. Shaw, 271 
City Officers (elected) — 

Directors of East Boston Ferries. 16, 199 

Trustees of Mt. Hope Cemetery, 16, 237 

Members of Coehituate Water Board, 16, 23, 39, 50, 79, 211, 

425 
Directors for Public Institutions, 23, 39, 199, 211, 227, 261, 

271, 311,359 
Trustees of Public Library, 23, 198, 551 
City Messenger, 39; assistants, 103, 338 



Clerk of Committees, 39, 649; assistant, 691 

Trustees of City Hospital, 39, 199, 211 

Assessors, 39 

Supt. Common and Public Grounds, 56 

Supt. Public Buildings, 56 

Harbor Master, 56 

City Surveyor, 66 

Supt. of Streets, 56 

Supt. of Public Lands, 56 

City Engineer, 56 

Supt. of Sewers, 56 

Commissioner of Cedar Grove Cemetery, 56 

Water Registrar, 56 

City Solicitor, 66 

First Assistant Assessors, 56 

City Registrar, 79 

Superintendents of Bridges, 79, 85 

Second Assistant Assessors, 85 

Inspectors of Lighters, 115; assistant, 138 

Overseers of Poor, 153. 565, 590 

Member of Board of Health, 174 

Fire Commissioner, 200 

Commissioner of Sinking Fund, 237 

License Commissioners, 271, 602 

Auditor of Accounts. 311 

Pound Keeper and Field Driver, 353 

Treasurer, 3sl 

Collector, 383, 399 

Record Commissioners, 399 

Park Commissioners, 429 
City Registrar — 

Permits for burials. 277, 291, 2.^9 

Reports on defining duties, 341 ; discussion, minority report 
adopted, and order passed, 360; reconsideration dis- 
cussed and refused, 389 

Order passed for report on efficiency and manner of con- 
ducting office, 392 

Order passed to appoint standing committee, 400; appointed, 
427 

Order transferring powers and duties, laid on table, 462 
City Registration of Deaths, etc. — (See also Census.) 

Report on incompleteness, 187 
City Solicitor — see Law Department. 
City Stables — 

On Canal street, Charlestown, 85, 381 

Order passed to erect on Childs street, Ward 17, 258 
City Surveyor — 

Annual report, 23 

Authorized to make purchases, 51 
City Treasurer — see Treasury Department. 
Claims — 

Payment of executions and judgments authorized, 40 

Certificate for $4,000 to John Gilson. 78 

§500 authorized for first volume Charlestown Records, 258 

Order passed to pay Ellen Donovan's claim, 554 

Order passed to pay Mary Noonan $600, 5U0 

Order passed to pay Wm. B. Chaplin $3,500 for personal 
injuries, 726 

Report and order passed to pay Standard Laundry Machine 
Co.. 750, 769 
Clarke. Mr., Ward 15 — remarks: on 

Rules and orders, 17 

Washington's Birthday, 50 

Sweit Street Extension, 78, 86, 107, 143 

Division of Wards, 109, 568, 630 

Annual Appropriations, 154 

Public Park. ISO 

Establishing Boston Water Board, 232 

East Boston murder, 290 

Street sweeping-machines, 324 

City Registrar's Department, 365, 390 

Tremont St. Mall, 388, 519 

Enforcement of License Law, 401 

Park Commission, 428 

Vegetable Maiket, 409 

Charles Hulbert's Estate, 540 

House offal. 692 

Yorktown Memorial, 713, 731 

Transportation of voters, 716 
Clerk of Committees — ■ 

Resignation of James M. Bugbee, 012 

Letter from Mr. Bugbee declining salary, 649 

Wm. H. Lee elected, 649 
Clocks — 

Maverick Cong. Soc. order amended, 211 
Committees — (see pocket edition of Organization of City Gov- 
ernment) — ■ 

Orders passed for appointment of Joint Standing Commit- 
tees, 10; explanation by President, 10 
Common Council — 

Order for printing Journal offered, and laid on table, 3; 
referred, 17; report that order ought not to pass ac- 
cepted, 57 

Reports on contested seats accepted, 5, 10, 11; seat of Fred- 
erick Pease given to Emery D. Loighton, 10 

Order passed relative to admission to anteroom, 6 

Mayor requested to appoint members special police, 17; 
Notice of appointment, 23 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



XVI [ 



Order passed to make arrangements for excursion. 409 
Resignation of Alexander Beat, member from Ward 16, 

accepted, 614 
Resolves and orders pnsscd relative to death of Councilman 

Kdvv. J. Long, 690 

Common and Public Grounds — 

$1,500 for labor on public grounds, 108 

$200 for tools and repairs on public grounds, 108 

$900 for public grounds, etc., East Boston, 237 

$1,650 for Blackstone, Franklin, Worcester and Lowell 

Squares, and Union Park, 237 
$2,500 for public grounds near Jamaica Pond, 237 
$10,000 for Common, Public Garden, etc., 237 
$1,500 for hiring teams, 237 
$2U0 for tools, 237 
$500 for trees and shrubs, 237 
$1,500 for sods, 237 
$250 for grass and other seeds, 237 
$1,500 for loam, 237 
$900 for manure, 237 
$6,000 for red gravel. 237 
$1,000 for water and watering streets, 237 
$100 for tools and repairs, 299 
$500 for trees and shrubs, 299 
$1,000 for repair of fences, etc., 313 
$5,000 tor plants, 313 
$1,000 for plants. 354 
$500 for mowing machine, 354 
$1,500 for work, 354 
$10,000 for labor, 354 
$1,000 for settees, etc., 428 
$5,000 for grading Madison Square, 428 
$650 for repair of concrete, 428 
$400 for sods, 428 
$228 for rustic flower stands, 428 
$195.66 for fountain in Independence Square, 428 
$8,000 for labor, 459 
$500 for team work, 483 

$417.35 to concrete walks, Independence Sq., 725 
$1,000 for watering streets around public grounds, 726 
$500 for repairs of fences and fountains, 767 
Ordinance passed, 313 
Orchard Park, report on improvement, 314 

$2,000 for improvements, 324 

Order passed relating to statue of Gen. Warren, 314 
Order passed for open-air concerts, 409 

Tremont Street Mall, report on curbstone, 276; discussion, 

and recommital, 2S9; reports on curb, 353; discussion, 

366, 386; non-concurrence on amendment, 425; order 

passed to procure proposals for fence, 399 

Report accepted, inexpedient to purchase estates on Orchard 

Park, 211 
Report on petition of T. A. Splaine discussed and recom- 
mitted, 227 ; report leave to withdraw accepted, 290 
Discussion on Madison Sq., non-concurrence. 501 

Discussion on fence, and contract authorized, 519; order 
for transfer of $3,400 rejected, 540; reconsideration, 553 
Discussion on Orchard Park and Madison Sq.. 523 

Orchard Park, order passed to report cost of grading, 525; 
report, 551 

Orchard Park and Madison Sq. discussed, and amended or- 
der passed. 551 

Order passed relative to preservation of trees, 625 

Lot adjoining Park Sq. placed in charge of Com., 691 

Order passed relating to passageway from Court Sq. to 
School St., 716 
Contingent Expenses — 

President authorized to approve bills, 11 
Crocker, Mr , Ward 6 — remarks: on 
Badges, 24, 27, 42 
Washington's Birthday, 40, 51 
Additional Water Supply, 54 
Ice on Sidewalks, 57. 80 

Redivision of Wards, 89, 108, 118, 554, 569 

Pay of laborers in employ of city, 107, 542, 594 
Public Park, 119, 183 

Establishing Boston Water Board, 215, 328, 360 

Salaries of License Commissioners, 254 

Committee for 17th June, 258 

Commission to supervise new Water Works, 260 

International Typographical Union, 276, 282 

Permits for burials, 277 

Assessments for construction of Sewers, 287 

Printing Public Park Bill, 290 

East Boston Murder, 290 

Supplies for Public Institutions, 301 

Fourth of July, 353 

Offal Shed, Ward 15. 315 

Contracts for Sudbury Conduit. 316 

Common and Public Grounds. 344 

City Registrar's Dipartment, 363, 389 

Official report, 369 

Park Commission, 428 

Sewer in Mystic Valley, 462, 483 

Engine-house, Ward 15, 462 

East Boston High School, 476 

Appropriation for Park Commissioners, 504, 525 

Alterations of Rules and Orders, 505 



Employment of Criminals, 544 

Orchard Park and Madison Sq., 552 

City Charter. 649, 672, 6J8 

House offal. 692 

Widening South St , 723, 747 

Yorktown Memorial, 731 

Licensing plumbers, 745 
Cushing, Mr.. Ward 4 — remarks: on 

Orchard Park and Madison Sq., 551 

Watering streets. 727 
Cushman, Mr.. Ward 1 — remarks: on 

Salaries of License Commissioners, 252 

Damon, Mr., Ward 12 — remarks : on 

Site for the City Point School-house, 506 
Day, Mr., Ward 1 — remarks : on 

Additional Water Supply, 55 

Water Board, 328. 359 

East Boston High School, 427, 463, 474 

Examination of egress from public buildings, 423 

Employment of Criminals, 523 

Railroad tracks in East Boston, 653 
Devereux, Mr., Ward 22 — remarks : on 

Establishing Boston Waiter Board, 175, 212, 232, 331 

Convict labor at House of Correction, 177 

The Appropriation Bill. 198 

Pay of laborers in city employ, 228 

Appropriation for 17th June, 234 

New Vegetable Market, 252, 407, 458 

Salaries of License Commissioners, 252 

Board of Education, 274 

International Typographical Union, 2>2 

Fourth of July, 311, 339, 352 

Enforcement of License Law. 400 

Sewer in Mystic Valley, 426, 459 

Employment of Criminals, 522, 545 

Licensing plumbers, 617 
Div sion of Wards — see Census — 
Duggan, Mr.. Ward 5— remarks: on 

Fourth of July. 305 

Official report, 369 

Elections — 

Discussion on transportation of voters, order indefinitely 
postponed, 715 

Ferries — 

Order passed to consider expediency of reducing tolls, 28 

Report accepted, inexpedient to reduce tolls, 79 

Wiunisimmet Ferry Co. to use slip, 540 

Contract for new ferry boat authorized, 540 
Fire Department — 

Expediency of establishing office of Fire Marshal, 76; indef- 
initely postponed. 290 

$255 for phonographic report of inquest, 85 

Locating engine, etc., between Maine Railroad Depot and 
Oustom-House, 311 

Second annual report of Commissioners, 472 

Report accepted and referred relating to chemical works, 
S. B., 565 

Orders passed relating to transportation of explosives, 678, 
728 

Order passed relating to telegraph in Chelsea, 691 

Monthly report of Commissioners, 715 
Fitzgerald. Mr., Ward 7 — remarks : on 

Rules and Orders. 17 

Badges, 24. 27, 42, 77, 161 

Additional Water Supply, 55 

Redivision of Wards, 79, 90. 117, 567, 625 

Swelt St. Extension, 143, 405 

Annual Appropriations, 154, 198 

Public Park, 156, 182 

Convict labor at House of Correction, 177 

Courtesy to President Grant, 199 

Establishing Boston Water Board, 214 

Appropriation for 17th June. 235 

Salaries of License Commissioners, 253 

Committee for 17th June. 255 

Vegetable Market, 273, 407, 469 

Board of Education, 273 

Record Commission, 283 

Supplies for Public Institutions, 301 

Street sweeping-machines, 324 

Fourth of July, 353 

Contracts for Sudbury River Conduit, 341 

City Registrar's Department, 364, 389 

Fence on Common, 368, 388 

Official report. 370 

Kindergarten Schools, 469 

Schools for licensed female minors, 471 

East Boston High School, 476 

Inmates of House of Reformation, 488 

Employment of Criminals, 522, 543 

Truant School, 545 

Pay of laborers in city employ, 592 

Licensing plumbers, 614, 646 

City Charter. 632, 697 

Truant School and Small-pox Hospital, 651 



XVIII 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



House ofl;il, 694 

Rules and orders. 728, 749 

Resolves relating to tenure of office, 731 

Swett St. U.K. Grade, 768 

Paying Deputy Collectors, 769 
Flynn, Mr., Ward 7 — remarks: on 

Badges, 26, 27. -12, 77, 140. 161 

Washington's Birthday, 50 

Election of Supt. of Common, etc.. 56 

Extension of Swett Street, 78. 88. 106, 107. 119, 141, 391. 404 

Bay of laborers in employ of city, 107, 251 

Widening of School St., 115 

Establishing Boston Water Board. 175, 360 

Reward for arrest of murderer of Mrs. Bingham, 219 

Appropriation 17th June, 235 

Salaries of License Commissioners, 252 

Committee for 17th June, 255, 271 

Commission to supervise new Water Works, 259 

Street sweeping-machines, 282 

Fourth of Julv, 313 

Contracts for Sudbury Conduit, 316 

Enforcement of License Law, 401 

Vegetable Market, 406, 468 

Sewer in Mystic Valley, 426 

Examination of egress from public buildings 428 

Bark Commission, 429 

Voting-places in new wards, 487 

Site for City Boint School-house. 506 

Bay of laborers in Paving Department, 488, 525, 590 

Fence on Common, 519 

Terrace St., 541 

Orchard Bark and Madison Sq., 525 

Bay of laborers in Health Dep't,, 541 

Division of Wards, 565, 612, 626 

Licensing Plumbers, 59U, 615 

City Charter, 632 

House offal, 648, 691 

Rules and orders. 727 

Widening South St , 729, 747 

Funeral expenses Vicc-Pres. Wilson, 726, 751 

Swett St. R.R. Grade, 768 
Fourth of July — 

Order passed to select orator. 299 

Discussion, and order passed, 305. 311, 338, 358 

Vote ruled invalid, discussed, and revised by yea and nay. 
352 
Funds — (see also Sinking Funds) — 

Order passed to pay interest due on Pierce Fuel Fund, 78 

G. A. R.— 

Invitation from Post 26 accepted, 175 

Allowance for Decoration Day' 199 

Invitations from Post 7 accepted, 200, 351, 381 
Gas — 

Order passed to appoint commission, 23 

Message from Mayor, relating to Commissioners, 153 

Compensation to Commissioners authorized, 175 

Commissioners appointed. 1U6 

Burning of coal tar at North End, 767 
Glover Statue — see Mayor. 
Guild, Mr., Ward 6 — remarks : on 

Washington's Birthday, 40 

Badges,~43, 161 

Sweit Street Extension, 87 

Public Bark, 156. 179 

Convict labor at House of Correction, 177 

Appropriation for 17th June, 236 

Petition of T. A. Splaine, 227 

Salaries of License Commissioners, 252 

Committee for 17th June, 255 

International Typographical Union, 276, 282 

Fourth of July, 312, 339 

Offal Shed, Ward 15, 315 

Fence on Common, 366, 386, 519 

Park Commission. 428 

Sewer in Mystic Valley, 460 

Madison Sq , 501 

Appropriation for Park Commissioners, 504 

Orchard Park and Madison Sq., 524, 552 

Yorktown Memorial, 730 

Widening South St.. 748 

Funeral expenses Vice-Pres. Wilson, 726, 751 

Harbor — 

Orders passed relative to removal of ice. 16 

Order passed relating to jurisdiction, 612 
Harmon, Mr., Ward 6 — remarks: on 

Badges, 43, 141 

Division of Wards, 109, 569. 627 

Convici labor at House of Correction, 177 

Fourth of July. 313. 338 

Orchard Park and Madison Sq,., 524 

Licensing plumbers, 618 

City Charter. 673 
Harrigan, Mr.. Ward 1 — remarks : on 

Additional Water Supply, 55 

Pay of laborers in employ of city, 106, 590 

Badges, 161 



Establishing Boston Water Board, 218 

Board of Education. 273 

East. Boston Murder, 291 

Fourth of July, 304, 311, 33S, 352 

City Registrar's Department, 364 

Enforcement of License Law. 4"l 

East Boston High School, 463, 475 

Charles Hulbert's Estate, 540 

Division of Wards, 571 

Licensing plumbers, 617, 644 

City Architect, 668 
Health, Board of — 

Authorized to establish hospital, 668 
Health Department — 

Sup't authorized to provide supplies, 40 

Order passed to consider expediency of accepting Act re- 
lating to inspectors of provisions, 138; report and order 
passed to accept Act, 153 

House Offal, East Boston, contract authorized, 160 

Discussion on pay of laborers, indefinite postponement, 541 

Discussion and order passed relating to house offal, 648, 691 

Order passed to allow fees to undertakers, 744; rescinded, 
767 
Hicks, Mr.. Ward 8 — remarks : on 

Appropriation for 17th June, 255, 271 
Homer, Mr.. Ward 11 — remarks: on 

Bay of laborers in Health Dep't, 542 
Howes, Mr., Ward 11 — remarks: on 

Additional Water Supply, 55 

Establishing Fire Marshal. 76 

Public Park, 179 

Committee for 17th June, 257 

International Typographical Union, 276, 282 

Fourth of July. 312 

Electing Mystic. Water Board, 316 

Water Board, 329 

City Registrar's Department, 364 

Official report, 36J 

Vegetable Market, 406 

Sewer in Mystic Valley. 426 

Park Commission, 428 

Appropriation for Park Commissioners, 502 

Division of Wards, 555 

Pay of laborers in city employ, 488. 592 

Licensing Plumbers, 614 

City Charter. 632, 650, 674, 693 

Yorktown Memorial. 730 

Resolves relating to tenure of office, 731 

Widening South St., 748 

Incidental Expenses — 

Funeral expenses of Vice-Pres. Wilson, 726, 751 

Jamaica Pond — 

Order passed relative to protection of life, 726 
Jaques. Mr., Ward 9 — remarks: on 

Badges, 24, 41. 77 

Washii gton's Birthday, 40 

Additional Water Supply, 55 

Swett Street Extension. 87, 106, 141 

Pay of laborers in employ of city, 107, 230, 542, 591 

Division of Wards. 118. 557 

Public Park, 120, 156. 178 

Annual Appropriations, 154 

System of keeping City Accounts, 197 

Appropriation for 17th June, 234 

Salaries of License Commissioners, 253 

Committee for 17th June, 257 

Permits for burials, 277, 291 

Assessments for construction of sewers, 289 

Supplies for Public Institutions, 303 

Contracts for Sudbury Conduit. 316 

Water Board, 329 

Fourth of July, 338 

City Registrar's Department, 361. 390 

Sewer in Mystic Valley, 485 

Appropriation for Park Commissioners, 503 

Orchard Park and Madison Sq., 524 

Charles Hulbert's Estate, 540 

Licensing Plumbers, 614, 644 

City Charter. 671, 698 

Deposits of City Funds, 678, 702 

House offal. 691 

Widening Souih St., 729 

Resolves re'ating to tenure of office, 731 

Funeral expenses of Vice Pies. Wilson, 726. 751 

Printing report of Sewerage Commission, 751 

Swett St. R. R. Grade, 768 

Kelly, Mr., Ward 21 — remarks: on 

Pay of laborers in employ of city, 107 

Establishing Boston Water Board, 217 

Bay of laborers in city employ, 526, 593 

Widening South St., 729 
Kimball. Mr., Ward 6 — remarks : on 

Rules and Orders, 17 

Badges, 23. 41, 77, 161 

Printing Charter document, 28 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



XIX 



Washington's Birthday. 40 

Additional Water Supply, 52 

Redivision of Wards, 79, 90. 118, 612, 625 

Extension of Swett Street, 106. 107, 142, 391, 403 

Pay of laborers in city employ, 1U7, 223 

Public Park, 155. 181 

Establishing Boston Water Board. 175, 213, 233, 353 

System of keeping City Accounts, 197 

Petition of T. A. Splaine, 227 

New Vegetable Market, 252. 273, 468 

Commission to supervise new Water Works, 259 

Permits for burials, 277 

Fourth of July, 352 

City Registrar's Department, 363, 389 

Sewer in Mystic Valley, 426. 461, 485 

Appropriation for Park Commissioners, 503 

Pay of laborers in Paving Dep't, 525 
•' ■' " '• Health " 542 

City Charter, 632, 649, 669, 700 

Truant School ami Small-pox Hospital, 651 

Deposits of City Funds, 679 

House offal, 692 

Rules and Orders, 727 

Yorktown Memorial, 731 

Resolves relating to tenure of office, 731 

Claim of Standard Laundry Machine Co.. 750 

Printing report Sewerage Commission, 751 

Swett St. R. R. Grade, 768 

Paying Deputy Collectors, 769 
King Kalakaua — 

Invitation to reception in Aldermen's chamber, 3 
Kingsbury. Mr.. Ward 15 — remarks: on 

Washington's Birthday, 41 

Official report, 370 

Orchard Park and Madison Sq.. 524 

Law Department — 

Order passed to purchase law books, 51 

Ordinance parsed providing for Fourth Assistant Solicitor, 51 

Leighton, Mr., Ward 1 — remarks: on 
Additional Water Supply, 54 

Liquor Licenses — 

Mayor requested to nominate License Commissioners, 211 
Office for License Commissioners authorized, 211 
Report directed establishing salaries, 211 
Clerk-hire to bo charged to License revenue. 251 
Discussion on Salaries, and order passed, 252 
Discussion, and order passed, requiring reports, 400 

Loans — 

$100,000 for water-pipes, Wards 17 and 19, 259 
$2,000,000 in anticipation of taxes. 354 
$267,000 for Back Bay streets and avenues, 519 

Long, Mr., Ward 8 — remarks: on 
Division of Wards, 117 
Badges, 140 
Appropriation for 17th June, 236 

Markets — 

Discussions on Vegetable Market. 251, 273; reference to 
special committee, 273; report, 325, 342; discussion, and 
order passed establishing. 406 

Discussion on $6,000 additional for Mercantile wharf prop- 
erty, and reference to Finance Com.. 469 

Order passed to sell horse, wagon, etc., 502 
Mayor — 

Copy of Inaugural Address requested for publication, 3 

Disposition of topics in address referred, 3 

Report and orders passed on disposition .of topics in ad- 
dress, 11 

Communication relating to Uniforms for City Employes, 161 

Communication relating to Monument at Yorktown, 371; 
report and discussion, 713, 730 

Communication relating to Statue of General Glover, 565 

Relating to death of Vice-Pres. Wilson, 678 

On supplying portfolios for Centennial Exhibition, special 
Committee appointed, I 6S 

On death of Councilman Edw. J. Long, 690 

Militia — 

Co. C, Fourth Bat. Inf., $65 rent allowed for temporary 
armory, 51 

Report accepted, leave to withdraw, on petitions for Ninth 
Reg., and Co. K, First Reg , 133 

Co. E, Ninth Reg , rent of armory discontinued. 138 

Co. C, Fourth Bat. Inf., discussion on armory and order 
passed, 138 

Co. D. Fourth Bat., rent discontinued, and rent author- 
ized, 161 

Co. E, Ninth Reg., rent authorized, 161 

Co. A, First Reg., pay for rent authorized, 161 

Co. D, Fourth Bat., $500 for armory, 199 

Co. C. Ninth Reg., $300 for armory, 237 

Co. A, Fifth Reg., $250 for armory, 237 

Co. G, Ninth Reg., $200 for armory, 237 

Co. A, Ninth Reg., $250 for fitting up and furnishing ai- 
mory, 275 

Order passed to hire two rooms corner Harvard and Wash^ 
ington Sts.,366 



Co A. First Reg , $75 for rent of armory, 331 
Co. A, First Reg.. $300 for rent, 483 
Permits for target firing, 551 
Minors — 

Rules and regulations concerning sales, 16 

Morrison, Mr., Ward 9 — remarks : on 

Badges, 25, 42 

Vegetable Market, 273 

Street sweeping-machines, 275 

International Typographical Union, 276, 2S2 

East Boston Murder, 290 

Fourth of July. 304, 311. 339 

Offal Shed, Ward 15. 315 

Contracts for Sudbury River Conduit, 340 

City Registrar's Department, 364, 389 

Fence on Common, 386, 519 

Vegetable Market, 407 

Sewer in Mystic Valley, 426 

Voting-places in new Wards, 488 

Licensing plumbers, 618, 644 

Division of Wards, 630 

Widening South St., 729 
Municipal Register — 

Order passed for preparing and printing, 3 

Report accepted, no action necessary to supply members of 
School Committee, 76 

Northampton St. District — 

Committee vested with powers, 6 

Orders passed assessing betterments, and to provide means 
for completing improvements. 76 

Com. authorized to settle grade damages, 227 

Order passed to take estates of J. E. Fitzgerald and others, 
311 

Order passed to take estate of Alvin J. Bartlett, 477 

Order passed to pay A. G. Bartlett $7,7S6.30, 612 

Report requesting additional appropriation, 631 

Order passed to vacate assessments, 767 
Noycs, Mr., Ward 5 — remarks: on 

Badges, 27 

System of keeping City Accounts. 196 

Contracts for Sudbury River Conduit, 316, 340 

Official report, 369 

Sewer in Mystic Valley, 462 

Licensing plumbers, 617, 746 

City Charter. 677 

House offal, 692 

Deposits of City Funds. 702 

Widening South St., 747 

Ordinances — 

To regulate office hours passed, 744 
Osborne, Mr., Ward 8 — remarks : on 

System of keeping City Accounts, 197 

Street sweeping-machines, 324 

East Boston High School, 474 

Deposit of City~Funds, 702 
Overseers of Poor — 

Message announcing death of Dr. Allen, 539 

Page, Mr., Ward 9 — remarks: on 

Badges, 77 

Swett St. Extension, 78, 86, 119. 141, 391, 402 

Pay of laborers in employ of city, 106 

Division of Wards, 110. 571, 630 

Armory in Ward 16, 13S 

Convict labor at House of Correction, 175 

The Appropriation Bill. 198 

Appropriation for 17th June. 235 

Street sweeping-machines, 232 

Supplies for Public Institutions, 300 

Fourth of July, 305 

Sewing-machines at House of Correction, 305 

Employment of City Architect, 316 

Enforcement of License Law, 400 

East Boston High School. 463, 475 

Kindergarten Schools, 469 

Schools for licensed female minors, 471 

Inmates of House of Reformation. 489, 504 

Site for City Point School-house, 505 

Employment of Criminals, 522 

City Architect, 668 

Widening South St., 728, 746 

Licensing plumbers, 744 

Claims of Standard Laundry Machine Co., 750 

Swett St. R.R. grade, 768 
Parker, Mr., Ward 14 — remarks: on 

Badges, 24 

Additional Water Supply, 54 

Board of Education, 274 

Fourth of July. 352 

Madison Sq., 501 

Division of Wards, 568, 612 

House offal, 691 

Yorktown Memorial, 731 



XX 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCrL. 



Paving Depnrtment — 

Order passed relating to pay of laborers, 488 ; report on 
same, and discussion, 625; minority report, 553; Dis- 
cussion and Resolve substituted and passed, 590 

Pay of laborers in city employ— (see also Paving and Health) — 
Discussion, and order passed relative to equalizing pay, 106 
Majority and Minority Reports, and order to print, 139 
Discussion, and substitute order passed, 228 
Concurrence in amendment, and reference, 251 
Report accepted, inexpedient to make any change, 299 
Order to place men on full time referred, 402 
Resolution rejected, 654 

Peabody, Mr., Ward 9 — remarks: on 
Priming Charter document, 28 
■Washington's Birthday, 40 
Additional Water Supply, 53 
Redivision of Wards, 90 
Extension of Svvett St., 106 
Pay of laborers in employ of city, 106 
Division of Wards, 110, 117 
Public Parks, 119. 184 
Convict labor at House of Correction. 177 
System of keeping City Accounts, 196 
The Appropriation Bill, 198 
Courtesy to President Grant, 199 
Printing Public Park Bill, 290 
East Boston Murder, 291 
Supplies for Public Institutions, 304 
Fourth of July, 304 
Water Board, 360 
Election of Collector, 382 
Park Commission, 42S 
Sewer in Mystic Valley, 460 
Ea-t Boston High School, 474 
Truant School and Small-pox Hospital, 651 
City Charter, 674 
Deposits of City Funds, 678, 702 
House offal, 692 
Soup for the poor, 713 
Widening South St., 728, 746 
Lice- sing plumbers, 614 

Perkins, Mr., Ward 16 — remarks: on 
Badges, 23, 27. 42 
Washington's Birthday, 40 

Election of Superintendent of Common, etc., 56 
Extension of Swett Street. 105 
Pay of laborers in employ of city, 106, 228 
Division of Wards, 118 
Public Park, 119 
Armory in Ward 16. 138 
Establishing Boston Water Board, 216. 230 
Appropriation for 17th of June, 234 
Petition of T. A. Splaine, 227 
Salaries of License Commissioners, 253 
Vegetable Market. 272, 407 
Street sweeping-machines, 281, 324 
Tremont Street Mall, 289, 366 
Fourth of July. 352 
New Offal Shed, Ward 15, 315 
Common and public grounds, 344 
City Registrar's Department, 362 
Official report, 370 
House offal. 648.691 

Truant School and Small-pox Hospital, 650 
Printing report Sewerage Commission, 751 
Swett St. R.R. grade, 768 

Police — 

Order passed relative to lodgers at Station Houses, 27 

Ordinance passed in relation to police fund, 311 

Order passed to pay for duty in Concord and Lexington, 
3-S1 
Power, Mr., Ward 22 — remarks : on 

Badges. 43 

Pay of laborers in employ of city, 106 

Establishing Boston Water Board, 218, 331 

Board of Education, 274 

Street sweeping-machines, 275 

Kindergarten Schools, 471 

Sewer in Mystic Valley, 486 

Truant School and Small-pox Hospital, 652 

Printing — 

Annual reports authorized in print, 5 

5,100 copies of Liquor Law, 2b7 

10,000 Public Park Bill, 290 

Expediency of reprinting Index to City Documents, 526; 
report, accepted. 590 

Order for printing report of Sewerage Commission dis- 
cussed and referred, 751 : \trraia. last word in order, 
for "Services" read '-Sewers;"] report and order 
passed, 767 
Public Baths — 

Order passed for repairs, etc., 40, 324 

Report on locating at Cragie's Bridge recommitted, 325 

Public Buildings — 

Annual report of Superintendent. 23 

Order passed for furniture, repairs, and cleaning, 51 



City Hall — Report on unsettled bills on Elevator, 161; pay- 
ment authorized, 176 
Faneuil Hall, order passed to strengthen floor and roof, 281 
Offal Shed. Highland Street, 315, 326 
Order passed to raise and alter Police Station No. 8, 327 
Sale of Engine House on Parker Street, 344 
Order passed to remove Hose 2 building, 386 
Discussion, and order passed for engine-house, Ward 15, 462 
Engine-house on Harvard Ave., Ward 19, 471 
Land on Ashland St , W. Roxbury, site for school-house, 472 
City Hall, order passed for watch-clock, 472 

order passed to pay bill of J. E Blakemore, 472 

Engine-house, Washington St., Ward 15, 472 

Discussion on Voting Places in new Wards, 487 

Engine-house, Mt. Vernon St., West Roxbury, 505 

Order pa-sed to provide Ward rooms, 540 

Expediency of fencing and grading Chapman School-house 

lot, 546 
Ward Room and Armory, South Boston, 565 
Report relating to new Engine Houses, 031 
Order passed relative to Public Halls, etc., 715 
Public Institutions — 

Order passed for report on expediency, concerning build- 
ings, 174 
Discussion and orders relating to convict labor, 175, 305 ; 

report, 314 
Discussion on supplies, and recommittal with instructions, 

239 
Ordinance passed, 338 

Annual report referred with instructions, 353 
Ward Room and Armory, South Boston, 565 
Discussion on classification of inmates of House of Reforma- 
tion, 488; order passed for report, 504 
Discussion on employment of criminals, and order passed, 

621 ; discussion and substitute order passed, 543 
Report on Truant School, and discussion, 545 
Order passed for enlargement of Eastern Ave., 551 
Order passed for sale of steamer Henry Morrison, 554 , 767 
Discussion on Truant School and Small-pox Hospital, orders 

passed, 651 
Order passed respecting amendments of statute, 715 
Public Lands — 

Annual report of Superintendent, 16 

Boston University, release of conditions, 338, 425 

Order passed to take possession of Swett St. hospital lot, 425 

Order passed for deed to H. R. Plimpton, 468 

Cancellation of bond, and new agreement with R. G. Day. 

ton and others, 483 
Forfeiture of land 7 Newbury St., 483 
Order to quit, 84 Village St., 483 
Two deeds to J. J. McNult, authorized, 551 
Estate of Alvin G. Barllctt placed in charge of Committee, 

648 
Forfeiture of land held by J. E. Billings, 726 
Public Library — 

Order passed to print proceedings at dedication of Dor- 
chester Branch, 26 
Report accepted, inexpedient to print proceedings at dedica- 
tion of Brighton Branch, 79 
Order of inquiry indefinitely postponed, 462 
Resignation of D. S. Curtis as trustee, 462 
Communication accepting plans for gallery, 628 

Public Parks — 

Discussion, 119, 155 

Discussion, and amended order passed, 178; live-minute 

rule rescinded, 178 
Commissioners nominated, 399 
Discussion on Commission, 428 

Order passed to provide office with furniture, etc., 472 
Order passed to provide means for clerical services, etc., 472 
Discussion on appropriation for Park Commissioners, order 

rejected, 502; reconsideration, 625 
Report accepted inexpedient to accept offer by S. B. Morse, 

713 



Railroad tracks in East Boston — 

Committee appointed to confer, 653 

Record Commission — 

Discussion, and amended order passed, 282 
Report and ordinance passed, 386 

Rewards-^ 

For arrest of murderer of Mrs. Bingham, 219, 290 

Rules and Orders — 

Of Common Council of 1874, temporarily adopted, 2 

Special Committee to prepare for Common Council, 2 

City Council of 1874, temporarily adopted, 2 

Pocket edition authorized, 3 

Of Common Council for 1875, discussed, amended and 

adopted, 17 
Joint Rules and Orders established, 23 
President adjourns Council for want of quorum, 238 
Order passed to consider alterations, 505; report, discussion, 
727; amendments passed, 749 

Rulings — 

On amendment relating to Division of Wards, 613 



INDEX TO PEOCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



XXI 



Salaries — (See also Pay of Laborers, also Liquor Licenses) — 
Of Fourth Assistant Solicitor fixed at $2,500, 85 
Salary Bill passed, 85 

Order paused to fix salaries of Treasurer, Auditor and Col- 
lector. 325 
Clerk of Committee-:, $2,750 per annum, 678 
Sampson, Mr., Ward 10 — remarks: ou 
Widening of School St., 115 
Annual Appropriations, 154 
Public Park, 155 

System of keeping City Accounts, 197 
Appropriation for 17th June. 236 
Appropriation for Park Commissioners, 502 
Division of Wards, 571 
House offal. 692 
Deposits of City Funds, 702 
Watering streets, 727 
Schools — 

Order passed for furniture and repairs, 51 
Report accepted inexpedient to purchase lot adjoining Chap- 
man School-house. 79 
Laboratory authorized for Roxbury High, 103 
Report accepted, inexpedient, add'l Primary-school accom- 
modations, Bigelow District, 115 
Gymnasium authorized for Latin School, 119 
Request for additional appropriation. 161 

" '• Primary school-house at City Point, 161 
Report and order for transfer of appropriation, referred in 

non-concurrence, 174 
Request for Primary accommodations in Brighton District, 

referred, 175 
Auburn Primary, order passed for additional accommoda- 
tions, 258 
Warrenton St.. for Deaf Mutes, order passed to furnish, 258 
Addition to Francis Street School-house, 281 
Order passed to pay bill of L. Foster Morse, 317 
Primary School corner of Main and Haverhill Sts., Charles- 
town, 325 
Site in Dorchester-Everett District, 354 
Report accepted inexpedient to fit up master's room, Adams 

School, 392 
Accommodations in Minot School District, 425 
Accommodation for Harvard Grammar School, 425 
Order passed for lecture loom in Bowditch School, 427 
Report and discussion on East Boston High School, 427, 463; 

discussion and substitute order adopted, 474 
Expediency of providing Kindergarten Schools, 459 
Discussion on Kindergarten Schools, non-concurrence in 

accepting report inexpedient to establish. 469 
Report inexpedient to furuish schools for licensed female 

minors, not accepted, in non-concurrence, 471 
Expediency of accommodations for drill in Charlestown 

High, 501 
School-house on Ashland St., 502 
Discussion on site for City Point School-house, 505 
Bath-house, Cabot St., for evening school, 505 
Pearl St., order passed to fence, 526 
Report accepted, inexpedient on more land for Eliot High, 

554 
Dorchester Everett District accommodations, 554 
Andrew District accommodations, 565 
Report accepted, relating to special instruction in Dwight 

District, 590 
Order passed relating to providing place for truant and va- 
grant minors, 595 
Grading lot adjoining Chapman School-house, 612 
Order passe I relative to sewing, 625 
Reports on Truant Schools, 629 

Free Evening Drawing School, West Roxbury Dist., 713 
Add'l Primary School, Lowell Dist., 713 
" " " Curtis St. Dist., 713 

" " " Comins Dist., 713 

Orders passed to investigate causes of fire in Rice and 
Phillips School-houses, for repairs and temporary ac- 
commodations, 744, 767, 768; report, 767 
Orders passed to pay for rent of armory and to furnish 

drill-room for Charlestown High, 767 
References to next School Board, 767 
Indefinite postponement, City Point Site, 767 
Sewers — 

Sewer in Mystic Valley — see Water. 

Change in mode of assessments, 77; expediency of amending 
ordinance, 227; report, 259; recommitted with instruc- 
tions, 287, 2H9; ordinance passed. 429 
Order to construct in Fellowes St., 271 
Order to construct in East Lenox St., 271 

Shaw, Mr., Ward 5 — remarks: on 
Badges, 24, 27, 42, 77 
Printing Charter document, 28 
Washington's Birthday. 40, 50 
Additional Water Supply. 55, 85 
Establishing Fire Marshal, 76 

Pay of laborers in employ of city, 106, 229, 488, 525, 542, 591 
Division of Wards, 109. 566, 612, 625 
Public park, 121, 155,179 
Annual appropriations, 154, 198 
System of keeping City Accounts, 196 
Courtesy to President Grant, 199 



Establishing Boston Water Board, 216, 328, 360 

Appropriation for 17th June. 234 

Petition of T. A. Splaine, 227 

.New Vegetable Market. 251, 271 

Committee for 17th June. 255, 271 

Commission to supervise new Water Works, 259 

International Typographical Union. 276, 232 

Street sweeping-machines, 275, 281, 324 

Record Commission, 283 

Assessments fur construction of sewers. 237 

Tremont Street Mall, 21KI, 367. 337, 520 

Printing Public. Park Bill, 290 

East Boston Murder, 291 

Permits for burials. 2)1 

Supplies for Public Institutions, 301 

Fourth of July. 3u5, 311, 338, 352 

Offal Shed. Ward 15, 315, 325 

Contracts for Sudbury Conduit, 316, 340 

Common and Public Grounds, 343 

Election of Collector, 331 

Cily Registrai's Department, 390 

Swett St., 391, 405 

Enforcement of License Law, 400 

Sewer in Mystic Valley, 459. 483 

Engine-house in Ward 15, 462 

East Bo.-ton High School, 464 

Vegetable Market, 463 

Kindergarten Schools, 470 

Voting-places in new Wards, 488, 572 

Madison Sq., 502 

Appropriation for Park Commissioners, 502, 525 

Employment of criminals, 522, 544 

Orchard Park and Madison Sq., 524, 552 

Charles Hulbcrt's Estate, 540 

Truant School, 545 

Licensing plumbers, 618, 645 

City Charter, 632, 6>0, 669, 695 

Truant School and Small-pox Hospital, 6 "3 

City Architect, 668 

Deposits of City Funds, 678 

House offal, 691 

Yorktown Memorial, 713, 730 

Soup for the poor. 713, 726 

Rules and orders, 727, 750 

Watering streets, 727 

Resolves relating to tenure of office, 731 

Widening South St., 747 

Claims of Standard Laundry Machine Co., 750 

Printing Report of Sewerage Commission, 751 

Swett St. R.li. Grade, 768 

Sibley, Mr., Ward 20 — remarks : ou 

The Appropriation Bill, 198 

Establishing Boston Water Board, 214 

Appropriation for 17th June, 234 

Salaries of License Commissioners, 252 

Committee for 17th June, 256 

Commission to supervise new Water Works, 260 

Offal Shed, Ward 15. 315 

Street sweeping-machines, 324 

City Charter, 076 

Widening South St., 747 
Sinking Kunds — 

Semi-annual reports of Commissioners, 26, 486 
Soup for the poor — 

Order passed for additional supply. 140 

Order passed, 713; concurrence in amendment, 726 
Sprague, Mr., Ward 4 — remarks : on 

Rules and orders of Common Council, 17, 727 

Joint Rules and Orders of Cily Council, 23 

Establishing Boston Water Board, 217 

Tremont St. Mall, 289, 3tiS, 388, 520 

Employment of criminals, 544 
Stacey, Mr , Ward 21 — remarks : on 

Establishing Boston Water Board, 175, 212 

Sewer in Mystic Valley, 460, 486 
Streets — 

Annual report of Commissioners, 16 

Ordinance reported to protect sidewalks from ice, 57; 
passed, 80 

Com. from Street Commissioners, on widening School St., 
referred, with amendment, 103; discussion, 115 

Order passed to consider expediency of amending ordinance 
relating to snow and ice, 115 

Columbus Ave. Extension, report on final settlement of 
damages, 105 

Street sweeping-machines, discussion. 275, 281; recommittal, 
281; report, discussion, and order passed, 324 

Report and ordinance relating to care of sidewalks in front 
of tenement houses, 380. 399 

Order to pay Boston Water Power Co. recommitted, 425 

Swett Street — Order passed to provide means, 39; discus- 
sion on order for loans, 78, 8<i; order pa-sod to procure 
opinion of City Solicitor, 88; report of Judiciary Com- 
mittee, and Solicitor's opinion on city's liability, 105 

discussion and order passed to delay construction, 106 

discus>ion on Swett Street Loan, 107 

discussion on extension. 118 

discussion, and amended order passed, 141 



XXII 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



notice of indefinite postponement of order to stay pro- 
ceedings, 153 

reports and discussion, 391 

discussion, and order passed rescinding restrictions. 402 

contract for construction authorized, 428; order indefi- 
nitely postponed. 428 

order passed for temporary tracks. 459 

report on raising ll.R. grade, 701 ; amended order passed, 

72i; leport, 750; discussion and order passed, 727 
West Chester Park Street — plans, etc., for bridges. 287 
Oliver Street — order passed in relation to certain estates, 

353 
Pearl Street — order passed to widen, 425 
Terrace St., resolve and order for laying out, 504 

order passed for laying out. 541 

North Market St.. order for urinal rescinded, 505 
Payment of $266,118.90, to N. C. Munson or assigns, 519 
Order passed to purchase estate of K. P. liobinson, 542 
South St., resolve and order for widening. 553: discussion 

on widening, 728; discussion and order rejected, 746; 

reconsideration, reference to nest City Council, 769 
Order passed to petition for widening School St., 614 
Order passed relating to driving cattle, 648 
Mill St. — report on widening, 732; order passed to purchase 

mill of Franklin King, 750 
Suffolk-Street District — 

Order passed authorizing Committee on Northampton Street 

District to settle outstanding business, 39 
Report on unfinished business. 284 
Order passed to pay $23,000 to Phinens E. Gay, 313 
Order for payment to Phineas E. Gay indefinitely postponed, 

339; reconsidered and passed, 427 
Swcetser, Mr., Ward 10 — remarks: on 
Additional Water Supply, 52 
Pay of laborers in employ of city, 107, 228 
Commission to supervise new Water Works, 260 
Board of Education, 274 
Water Board. 327 

Contracts for Sudbury Hiver Conduit, 340 
Sewer in Mystic Valley, 426 
East Boston High School, 427 
Sewer in Myr-tic Valley, 4^3 
Division of Wards. 555, 571 
Licensing Plumbers, 744 

Funeral expenses Vice-Pres. Wilson, 726, 751 
Paying Deputy Collectors, 769 
Taxes — 

Report accepted, no authority to refund to Appleton tem- 
porary Home, 39 
Order passed to pay tax on estate of David Sears, 51 
Orders passed laying tax for 1875-6, 153 
Report and order passed to refund taxes to Trinity Church, 

477. 483 
Collector to receive certain deposits. 540 
Discussion on, and order passed relating to Charles Hul- 

bert's Estate, 540 
Taxes on estate of J. H. Billings assessed, 619 
Thacher, Mr., Ward 16 — remarks: on 
Annual appropriations, 154 
Convict labor at House of Correction, 176 
Reward for arrest of murderer of Mrs. Bingham, 219, 290 
Commission to supervise new Water Works. 260 
Sewing-machines at House of Correction, 305 
Water Board, 3tt0 
City Registrar's Department, 366 
Personal explanation. 391 
Engine-house, Ward 15, 462 
Terrace St., 541 
Truant School. 545 
Division of Wards, 557, 630 
Licensing Plumbers, 614, 744 
Truant School and Small-pox Hospital, 651 
Transportation of Voters, 715 
Claims of Standard Laundry Machine Co., 750 
Printing Report Sewerage Commission, 751 
Paying Deputy Collectors. 763 

Train, Mr., Ward 13 — remarks: on 
Badges, 77 

Swett Street Extension, 78. 88, 106, 142, 391, 403 
Redivision of Wards, 90, 570 
Annual Appropriations, 154 
Convict labor at House of Correction. 176 
System of keeping City Accounts, 197 
Vegetable Market. 273 
Supplies for Public Institutions, 239 
Fourth of July, 338. 352 
Offal Shed, Ward 15, 316 
Street sweeping-machines, 324 
Fence on Common, 3S8 
Park Commission, 42S 
Voting-places in new Wards, 487 
Appropriation for Park Commissioners, 502 
Work for the unemployed. 505 
Charles Hulbert's Estate, 540 
Employment of Criminals, 543 
Truant School. 545 
Orchard Park and Madison Sq., 552 
Pay of laborers in city employ, 591 



House offal, 648. 691 

City Charier, 671 

Swett St. R. R. Grade, 768 
Treasury Department — 

Death of Frederic U. Tracy, 12 

Selection of candidate for City Treasurer referred, 12 

.Notice of appointment of Charles H. Dennie, Treasurer pro 
(cm,., received and placed on file, 12 

Order passed for examination of late Treasurer's accounts, 
16 

Order passed for petition relative to Assistant Treasurer, 39 

Salary of late Treasurer continued to July 1, to widow, 76 

Act concerning Treasurer and Collector accepted, 281 

Accounts for financial year referred, 299 

Ordinances passed, 360 

Report on Treasurer's accounts accepted, 359 

Election of Treasurer, 381 

Discussion and election of Collector, 381. 3S3, 399 

Order passed to furnish additional safe, 472 

Report on unpaid Taxes accepted, 565 

Salaries of Deputy Collectors, ;' 65 

Discussion on deposits of City Funds, 678; discussion, sub- 
stitute order passed, 702 

Order passed to pay Deputy Collectors, 769 
Trull, Mr , Ward 20 — remarks: on 

Armory in Ward 16, 138 

Seventeenth of June, 271 

Unfinished Business — 

Of last year, referred to joint standing committees, 3 
Referred to next City Council: — 

Report on High-Service Water Supply, 714. 

Report on alteration in Public Library, 713 

City Charter, 731 

Loan for Mystic Valley Sewer, 732 

Appointments to Mystic Water Board, 744 

Homoeopathic Hospital treatment, 767 

Widening South St , 769 

Transfer of City Registrar to Board of Health, 769 

Unfinished business of Joint Committees, 769 

Vacation — 

Adjournment to first Tuesday in September, 429 
Votes of Thanks — 

To City Council by Thomas G. Stephenson Post G\ A. R., 

324 
To Gen. F. A. Osborn, Brevet Major-Gen. Richard Arnold, 

etc., June 17th, 359 
To Rev. James Freeman Clarke for oration, July 5, 399 

Wadsworth, Mr., Ward 4 — remarks : on 

Official report, 369 
Walsh, Mr , Ward 5 — remarks: on 

Pay of laborers, 526, 590, 654 
Wards, Hivision of — see Census. 
Washington's Birthday — 

Order for celebrating discussed and passed, 40 

Discussion on, and amended order passed, 50 
Water — 

Report recommending granting $1,530,000, accepted, and re- 
ferred to Finance Committee, 2$ 

Discussion on additional supply, 51 

Order relating to union of Cochituate and Mystic Water 
Boards amended and referred, 76; report and order 
passed to petition for act empowering Boston Water 
Board to act as agent of city, 91 

Orders passed for appropriating $1,530,000, 78 

Report on ordinance to establish Boston Water Board, 161 ; 
discussed, 175, 212 

Contracts authorized for building aqueduct and constructing 
reservoirs, 199 

Discussion on Boston Water Board, and ordinance rejected, 
230; reconsideration refused, 258; altered and referred, 
275: reports, 285; discussion and ordinance- passed, 327 ; 
adherence. 338, 353, 359; conference report, 400 

Order relating to commission to supervise new works dis- 
cussed 259 : referred, 275 

Order passed relating to High Service, 276 

Annual report authorized in print. 287 

Acts relating to Mystic sewer and storage referred to Mystic 
Board, 299 

Act to preserve purity of Lake Cochituate referred to Water 
Board, 311 

Wards 17 and 19, report and order passed, 314 

Order passed relative to electing Mystic Water Board, 316 

Discussion on contracts for Sudbury Conduit, and reference, 
316 

Resignation of Thomas Gogin, 324 

Report accepted, inexpedient on Sudbury Conduit bond, 
327 ; reconsideration refused, 340 

Report of Mystic Water Board on storage basin, etc., re- 
ferred, 370; report, and acts accepted, 3v>9 

Report accepted, no action necessary to purify Lake Cochitu- 
ate. 429 

Sewer in Mystic Valley, discussion and reference, 426, 459 

Discussion and order authorizing construction passed, 484 

Order authorizing loan rejected, 486 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



xxni 



Reconsideration, 502 

Collector's accounts for supply to East Boston, 551 

Report and order passed, on vacancies in Mystic Water 
Board, 573 

Order passed authorizing construction of Conduit, etc., by 
days' labor, etc., 590 

Contract between Boston and Charlestown annulled, 590 

Order relating to licensing Plumbers laid on the table, 590 

Order passed to lay pipe across Mystic River, 612 

Discussion on regulating Water Fixtures and licensing 
Plumbers, amended order passed, 614 

Report authorized in print on high-service system, 654 

Communication from Water Board, and report of City Engi- 
neer on High-Serviee Water Supply, referred to next 
City Council, 714 

Reports on sundry requests of Water Board, 715 

$50,000 authoiized for pipes, 726 

Discussion on licensing Plumbeis and recommittal, 744 

Order passed to petition for protection of supply, 767 

Com. to report ordinance to regulate water fixtures, 767 

$160,000 for pipes in Brighton and West Roxbury, 766 
Whitmore, Mr., Ward 4 — remarks : on 

Badges, 27 

Printing Charter document, 28 

Washington's Birthday, 40, 50 

Redivision of Wards. 79, 88, 108, 115, 554, 565, 625, 630 

Widening of School Street, 115 

Annual Appropriations, 154 

Convict labor at House of Correction, 175 

Establishing Boston Water Board, 214, 360 

Appropriation for 17th June, 235 

Committee for 17th June, 256 

Vegetable Market, 272 

Board of Education. 274 

Permits for burials, 277. 291 

Record Commission, 282 

Supplies for Public Institutions. 299 

Fourth of July, 305, 338 

Sewing-machines at House of Correction, 305 

City Registrar's Department, 361, 389 

Official Report, 369 

Fence on Common, 386 

Park Commission, 428 

East Boston High School, 464, 474 

Kindergarten Schools, 470 

Voting-places in new Wards, 487 

Inmates of House of Reformation, 489, 504 

Pay of laborers in Paving Department, 488 

Bill for taking Census, 540 

Employment of Criminals. 521, 543 

City Charter, 632, 649, 671, 699 

City Architect, 668 

House offal, 692 

Yorktown Memorial, 713 

Rules and Orders. 727 

Resolves relating to tenure of office, 731 



Wilbur, Mr., Ward 13 — remarks: on 
Fourth of July, 305, 311 
Street sweeping-machines, 324 
Water Board, 360 
Fence on Common, 386 
Madison Sq., 501 

Orchard Park and Madison Sq., 523, 651 
City A rchitect, 668 
Cily Charter, 677 
House offal, 692 
Licensing Plumbers, 745 

Willcutt. Mr., Ward 17 — remarks : on 
Badges, 77 

Pay of laborers in city employ, 230, 251 
Fourth of July, 313 
Offal Shed, Ward 15. 315 
Fence on Common, 368 
Vegetable Market, 407 
Division of Wards, 571 
Swett St. R. R. Grade, 768 

Wilson, Mr., Ward 12 — remarks: on 
Rules and Orders, 17 
Additional Water Supply, 51 
Badges, 77 

Division of Wards, 100, 555, 567, 626 
Swett St. Extension, 118, 141, 403 
Armory in Ward 16, 138 

Establishing Boston Water Board, 216, 233, 323, 359 
Salaries of License Commissioners, 254 
Committee for 17th June, 257 
Commission to supervise new Water Works, 260 
Record Commission, 283 
Assessments for construction of sewers, 288 
Fourth of July. 305, 352 
Offal Shed, Ward 15, 315 
Contracts for Sudbury River Conduit, 340 
City Registrar's Department, 364, 390 
Sewer in Mystic Valley. 459, 483 
Kindergarten Schools, 471 
East Boston High School, 476 
Licensing Plumbers, 616 
City Charter, 676 
House offal, 694 

Yorktown Memorial — see Mayor 



FINAL PROCEEDINGS. 



Resolutions of thanks to President, 769 

Remarks by Mr. Brackett, 769 

Response of President, 770 

Request for a copy of President's address, 771 

Adjournment sine die, 771 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Organization of the G-overnment, 

JANUARY 4, 1875. 



The organization of the City Government took 
place today,. 

IN BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The members-elect were called to order at 
ten o'clock A. M. by the City Clerk, Samuel F. 
McCleary. The Mayor-elect, Hon. Samuel Crocker 
Cobb, entered the chamber and assumed the 
chair, accompanied by Rev. George Putnam, D. D., 
and Hon. Horace Gray, Chief Justice of the Su- 
preme Judicial Court. 

Mr. Long, member of the Common Council 
from Ward 1, delivered a message from that body 
announcing that a quorum was present and ready 
to proceed with the business of organization. 

The Mayor and Aldermen elect proceeded to the 
Common Council Chamber, in charge of 
City Messenger Peters and accompanied by 
Justice Gray and King Kalakaua. 

IN COMMON COUNCIL. 

The members elect of the Common Council were 
called to order at ten o'clock A.. M., by Mr. N. M. 
Morrison of Ward 9, the senior member, who 
said he would make no remaiks, but would rec- 
ommend that they proceed at once to business. 

On motion of Mr. Thacher of Ward 15, the 
certificates of members were collected by a com- 
mittee of three appointed by the Chair, viz. : Messrs. 
Thacher of Ward 15, Burditt of Ward 16, and Caw- 
ley of Ward 2. 

They reported that they had collected 04 certifi- 
cates and that a quorum was present. 

The report was accepted. 

On motion the Chair appointed Mr. Long 
of Ward 8 a committee to convey a message to 
the Mayor and Aldermen elect that a quorum of 
the Common Council is present and ready to pro- 
ceed to business, and requesting that the Mayor 
and Aldermen would forthwith attend for the pur- 
pose of qualifying the members. 

Mr. Long attended to that duty and reported 
that the Mayor and Aldermen would soon be in 
attendance. 

IN JOINT CONVENTION. 

The Mayor and Aldermen elect entered the 
. Council Chamber, and assumed their respective 
positions. 

Rev. Dr. Putnam offered prayer, and Chief 
Justice Gray administered the usual oaths of office 
to Hon. Samuel C. Cobb, the Mayor elect. 

The names of the Aldermen elect and Common 
Councilmen elect were severally called by the 
City Clerk, and the oaths of office were admin- 
istered to them by his Honor the Mayor. 

The address of the Mayor was then delivered, 
and at its conclusion the Mayor and Aldermen re- 
tired to their chamber. 

IN BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On returning from the joint convention, the 
Mayor in the chair, the Board of Aldermen 
proceeded to the election of a chairman. It ap- 
peared that John T. Clark had received 10 votes, 
and he was declared elected. 
Alderman Clark took the chay- and said- 
Gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen— I am 
deeply sensible of the honor which you have con- 
ferred in electing me your Chairman for the ensu- 
ing year. For this mark of your confidence and 
respect I tender to you my sincere thanks. In ac- 
cepting the position, I do so well knowing the re- 
sponsibilities it involves, and that without your 
generous support and forbearance it would be im- 
possible for me to administer its duties acceptably 
to you or with credit r.o myself. 

Relying, therefore, with confidence upon you 
and your sympathy, it will be my endeavor to per- 
form the work which you have assigned me hon- 
estly, impartially and according to the best of my 
ability. The labors of the Board, always arduous, 
will be none the less so during the year upon which 
we have entered. 

Matters of the highest importance concerning 
thejpresent and future welfare of the city will 
come before us and will require patient and care 
ful consideration. 

Among the first and one of the most important 
subjects which will claim our attention will be 



that of the "new city charter," which has been 
prepared with great care by an able and compe- 
tent commission, and which, if adopted, will 
doubtless remove many existing evils and prepare 
the way for such changes in the administration of 
the affairs of the city as the interests of the peo- 
ple require'. 

Boston to a certain but perhaps less extent 
shares in the general dulness of business which 
prevails in all of the business cities of the coun- 
try, and it is our duty, and I have no doubt it will 
be our desire, to economize in every respect, 
where economy now will not prove to be extrava- 

fance in the future, and by so doing reduce, as 
ar as is possible, the present high rate of taxa- 
tion. 

Gentlemen, I think I may safely say that we 
have accepted the position which we occupy, un- 
derstanding its labors and responsibilities, and 
with an honest desire to advance the welfare and 
prosperity of Boston, and to serve faithfully those 
who have committed their great trust to our care. 

\rich a firm reliance upon God, from whom 
cometh all our help, we enter upon our labors, 
and trust that they may not be in vaiD. Thank- 
ing you again, gentlemen, and wishing you all a 
pleasant and happy New Year, I await your pleas- 
ure. 

On motion of Alderman Quincy a message 
was sent to the Common Council that the Board 
was organized, and a recess of ten minutes was 
taken, at the expiration of which a message was 
received from the Common Council that they had 
organized, and were ready to proceed to business. 

Alderman Clark offered the following : 

Ordeieo, That the draft of the new city charter, 
with the report of the commissioners thereon, be 
referred to a joint special committee consisting of 
three members of this Board, with such as the 
Common Council may join, and that said commit- 
tee be requested to report as early as practicable. 

Read twice and passed, and Aldermen Clark, 
Quincy and O'Brien appointed. Sent down. 

Alderman Stebbins offered the following: 

Ordered, That Aldermen , with 

such as the Common Council may join, be a 
committee to consider and report what disposi- 
tion should be made of the several topics in the 
Mayor's inaugural address. 

Passed, and Aldermen Stebbins and Viles ap- 
pointed said committee. Sent down. 

On motion of Alderman Prescott, a message 
was sent to the Common Council proposing a 
joint convention for the choice of City Clerk. 
Subsequently a message was received that the 
Council had concerred, and the Board proceeded 
to the Council chamber. 

IN COMMON COUNCIL. 

Mr. Morrison resumed the chair of the Common 
Council on the dissolutton of the joint conven- 
tion, and on motion of Mr. Willcutt of Ward 
17, a ballot for President was ordered, Messrs. 
Willcutt of Ward 17, Goldthwait of Ward 11 
and Cawley of Ward 2 being appointed a com- 
mittee to collect and count votes. They re- 
ported as follows : 

Whole number of votes cast 71 

Necessary to a choice 3(i 

Halsey J. Boardman of Ward 14 70 

John Q. A. Brackett of Ward 10 1 

And Mr. Boardman was declared elected. 

Messrs. Brackett of Ward 10 and Wilson of 
Ward 12 were appointed a committee to con- 
duct the President to the chair. 
On taking the chair President Boardman said — 
Gentlemen of the Common Council — For the 
honor you have conferred in electing me to pre- 
side over your deliberations for the ensuing year, 
you will accept my profound acknowledgments. 
To designate me as your presiding officer, when 
there are so many of your number certainly not less 
capable, is a compliment I cannot fail to appreci- 
ate. In accepting I am not unminaful of either 
the responsibility or the difficulties of the position, 
and I appea* to you now as I always shad during 
my term of office, for your support, your coopera- 
tion and your forbearance. I regret I cannot 
promise that I will neither commit errors nor 
make mistakes, but I pledge to you honesty of 
purpose, sincerity of effort and impartiality of 
action in the discharge of all duties that may de- 
volve upon me here. The custom which prevails 
in most wards of our city of enforcing rotation in 
the election of members of the Council, com- 
bined with other causes, has deprived us of the 
valuable aid of a large number who were 



JANUAEY 



1875 



2 



members during the past year. Yet it is 
a matter of congratulation that so many of 
the incoming and new members, either from 
previous experience here or from ripe business 
training, are admirably fitted to All the vacancies 
thus created. Not the least difficult and delicate 
duty— a duty incumbent upon me at the outset of 
•official life— is the appointment of committees up- 
on the various subjects within the domain of the 
Council. In the ever widening range of questions 
arising here, the absolute necessity of intelligent 
and conscientious committee work is cleaily ap- 
parent. In the committee room are all the issues 
affecting the welfare of the city within your prov- 
ince substantiflly devoloped. When a matter re- 
ceives the approval of its appropriate committee, 
the ratification of this Council, with rare 
exceptions, is a logical sequence. The reason for 
such a course is obvious. The larger portion, if 
not all, tne members of this assembly are engaged 
in individual and personal occupations. They 
•can surrender only a moiety of their time to at- 
tention to the interests of the city. Even if this 
were not true, no individual could become thor- 
oughly conversant with the details of all subjects 
that are presented here for action, since they are 
multitudinous in number and often complex in 
character. The suggestion is old, but important, 
that tne various committees should realize their 
responsibility, in this regard, and that no report 
should ever be submitted until its subject-matter 
has been fully investigated by each mem- 
ber of such committee, so that not oidy 
shall the conclusion reached be certain and defi- 
nite, but complete information can be furnished 
to the Council when desired. While each suc- 
ceeding year imposes additional labor upon this 
assembly, commensurate with the growth of our 
city, yet the one before u^, in prospective busi- 
ness, has been rarely paralleled. Two subjects of 
momentous interest will claim your early atten- 
tion—the draf of the new city charter and 
the water question, transmitted to you in only 
a partially solved condition. Both demand and 
should receive the prompt and careful consider- 
ation to which their great importance entitles 
them. Though the future, to the thought- 
ful mind, is radiant with promise, yet it is 
an unwelcome fact that the immediate outlook 
from the opening of the current year is not so 
cheering or hopeful as in many years that are 
past. Trade is depressed, taxation is burden- 
some almost without precedent, stagnation per- 
vades many great enterprises, labor seeks in vain 
for employment, and hunger and want are in our 
midst. Surely, neyer before was a wise and judi- 
cious management of public affairs more desir- 
able ; never before were retrenchment and 
economy, so far as consistent with our highest 
interests, more loudly called for. The year 
upon whose threshold we now stand is 
memorable — memorable as the one hundredth 
anniversary of our national life, and our thoughts 
naturally wander back and awaken memories of 
the founders of the republic — men famous in pro- 
claiming sound principles of government and 
equality, famous for sturdy and uncompromising 
adherence to those principles, so that under their 
benign influence moral greatness has been sup- 
plemented by material greatness, and every citi- 
zen of this country in every quarter of the" globe 
can proudly say, " I am an American." And 
the important part that this city bore in 
the achievement of national existence— the 
statesmen and heroes she so freely, nay 
lavishly lent to her country — enables every 
citizen of ours to say with not unequal pride, 
"I am a Bostonian." But it is not enough to be 
heirs of a glorious past to fully secure this result. 
The pi-esent must be guarded with sleepless 
and never-wearying vigilance. And to this end 
the government ot this city should be one in the 
present and future, as in the past, that shall com 
mand confidence and respect — that shall combine 
high moral purpose and conception with wisdom 
and foresight and action— that shall not be so 
exclusive but that all its citizens can afford to re- 
main such and be enriched by its benefits and 
share in its historic renown. Gentlemen, to the 
advancement of all the interests of this great mu- 
nicipality I invoke with confidence your pure 
motives and your best energies. 

On motion of Mr. Noyes of Ward 5, a ballot for 
Clerk was ordered, Messrs. Noyes, Cawley, Cush- 
ing, Kimball and Moley being appointed a com- 
mittee to collect and count votes, and they re- 
ported as follows : 



Whole number of votes cast 72 

Necessary to a choice 37 

Washington P. Gregg 72 

And Mr. Gregg was declared elected, and the oaths 
of office were administed by John P. Healy, City 
Solicitor. 

On motion, Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 was ap- 
pointed a committee to convey a message to the 
Board of Aldermen and inform that body of the 
organization of the Council, which duty he per- 
formed. 

A certificate was received from the Board of 
Aldermen that they had organized and elected 
John T. Clark Chairman. Placed on file. 

The Mayor and Aldermen entered the chamber, 
and a joint convention was held. 

IN JOINT CONVENTION. 

The Mayor presided and the convention pro- 
ceeded to ballot for a City Clerk, Alderman 
Power and Councilmen Bracket t of Ward 10 and 
Train of Ward 13 being appointed a committee to 
collect and count votes. They reported as follows: 

Whole number of votes cast 85 

Necessary to a choice 43 

Samuel F. McCleary 83 

James M. Bugbee 2 

And Mr. McCleary was declared elected. 

The oath of office was administered to Mr. Mc- 
Cleary by the Mayor, and the convention dis- 
solved. 

IN BOARD OF ALDEKMEN. 

On motion, it was ordered that Aldermen Har- 
ris and Pope be a special committee to examine 
the rules and orders of 1874 and report what altera- 
tions are required. 

Alderman Power offered the following: 

Ordered, That the several heads of departments 
and Board of Direction in the several branches of 
the City Government be authorized to submit 
their annual reports in print under the direction 
of the Superinteneent of Printing. 

Passed and sent down. 

On motion of Alderman Worthington, Monday, 
at 4 P. M., was fixed as the time for the regular 
weekly meetings of the Board. 

Alderman Quincy offered the following : 

Ordered, that the members of this Board, with 
one member of the Common Council from each 
ward, be a committee to determine and pay the 
allowances of State aid to "families of disabled 
soldiers and the families of the slain," pursuant 
to the several acts of this Commonwealth ; and 
that said committee have power to employ a pay- 
master and such clerical assistance as may be 
required for this purpose. 

Passed and sent down. 

On motion a, special committee consisting of 
Alderman Power and Prescott, with such as the 
Council may join, to prepare joint rules and or- 
ders. Sent down. 

Adjourned to Thursday next at four o'clock 

r. m. 

IN COMMON COUNCIL 

It was ordered, 

On motion of Mr. Thacher of Ward 15, That 
Thursday next at 8% P. M.be assigned as the time 
for the election of Standing Committee on Ac- 
counts, and Messrs. Sibley of Ward 20, Morrison 
of Ward 9 and Kingsbury of Ward 15 were ap- 
pointed a committee to nominate candidates. 

On motion of Mr. Page of Ward 9— Messrs. Page 
of Ward 9, Parker of Ward 14, Wadsworth of 
Ward 4, Devereux of Wi<rd 22 and Felt of Ward 
11, were appointed the Standing Committee of the 
Council otv Elections. 

On motion of Mr. Kimball of Ward 6— That 
Thursday rext at 8 P. M., be assigned as the time 
for the election on the part of the Council 
of a Standing Committee on Finance, and 
on motion of Mr. Perkins of Ward 16, Messrs. 
Perkins of Ward 16, Walbridge of Ward 12, and 
Woods of Ward 8, Goldthwait of Ward 11, and 
Collins of Ward 2, were appointed a committee to 
make nominations. 

On motion of Mr. Beal of Ward 16— That the 
rules and orders of the Common Council of 1874 be 
adopted for the government of this Council until 
otherwise ordered. 

On motion of Mr. Sibley of Ward 20— That 
Messrs. Sibley of Ward 20, Sprague of Ward 4, 
and Train of Ward 13, be appointed a committee 
to prenare rules and orders fo* the Common 
Council of 1875. 

On motion of Mr. Perkins of Ward 16— That the 
joint rules and orders of the City Council of 1874 
be adopted as the rules and orders of the City 
Council of 1875. Sent up. 



CITY GOVERNMENT 



On motion of Mr. Long of Ward 8, that Thurs- 
day, at 7y 2 o'clock P. M., be the time of the meot- 
ing of the Council until otherwise ordered. 

On motion of Mr. Sweetse- of Ward 10— That his 
honor the Mayor be requested to f urniih a copy 
of his address, that the same may be printed. 
Sent up. 

On motion of Mr. Day of Ward 1, That the sev- 
eral joint standing committees be directed to re- 
sume the unfinished business of the year, appro- 
priate to such committees, and all such business 
be hereby referred accordingly. Sent up. 

On motion of Mr. Pease of Ward 1— That the 
Municipal Register be piinted under the direc- 
tion of the Joint Committee on Rules and Orders, 
who may employ such assistance as may be 
deemed advisable ; and that they also prepare a 
pocket edition for the use of the members. Sent 
up. 

Mr. Duggan of Ward 5 offered an order that the 
Clerk prepare and cause to be printed a transcript 
of the journal of the Councd for the current mu- 
nicipal year. 

Mr. Crocker suggested that the full proceedings 
are published in the Evening Transcript report 
and copies furnished the members; and that the 
order might be fully considered he moved to refer 
it to the Committee on Printing, to be appointed. 

Mr. Duggan said it was the order usually sub 
mitted at that time, and he hoped it would pass. 

On motion of Mr. Noyes of Ward 5 the order 
was laid on the table. 

Mr. Long of Ward 8 offered an order for the ap- 
pointment of a joint special committee to nomi- 
nate candidates for Directors for Public Institu- 



tions. Laid on the table on motion of Mr. Burlitt 
of Ward 16, who said it was an unusual order to 
offer at this time. 

Papers were received from the Board of Alder- 
men for concurrence, as follows : 

Order appointing a joint special committee to 
consider the topics in the Mayor's message. Pass- 
ed, and Messrs. Thacher of Ward 15, Shaw of 
Ward 5 and Willcut of Ward 17 were joined on 
the part of the Council. 

Order referring the report on the new city char- 
ter to a joint special committee. Passed, and 
Messrs. Kimball of Ward 6, Fitzgerald of Ward 7, 
Brackett of Ward 10, Flynn of Ward 7 and Crock- 
er of Ward 6 joined to said committee. 

Petitions for recounts of votes for Councilmen 
were presented as follows : 

By Mr. Flynn of Ward 7— Petition of Thomas 
Haney of Ward 7. 

By Mr. Thacher of Ward 15— Petition of citizens 
of Ward 20. 

Bv Mr. Brackett of Ward 10— Petition of J. W. 
Hobbs of Ward 21. 

By Mr. Flynn of Ward 7— Petition of Fred. 
Shunk of Ward 13. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Elec- 
tions of the Common Council. 

The drawing for seats proceeded in the usual 
m inner. 

The President announced that the members 
were invited to a reception to King Kalakaua, in 
the Aldermen's chamber, after adjournment, and 
on motion of Mr. Perkins of Ward' 16 the Council 
adjourned and stands adjourned till Thursday 
evening next at 7% o'clock'. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceeding's of the Board of Aldermen, 

JANUARY 7, 1875. 



Adjourned regular meeting at fonr o'clock P. 
M., Alderman Clark, Chairman, presidiug. 

EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 

Railroad Police for dutv at Lowell Railroad De- 
pot— M. T. Donahoe, L. S. Bean, M. V. Cook, John 
Carmichael. Thomas Young. Several confirmed. 

Mayor's Clerk— James L. Hillard. Sent down. 

COMMUNICATIONS FKOM CITY OFFICERS. 

Inspector of Lighters. Quarterly report for Dec . 
31,1874 — Vessels inspected, 254; cargoes of same, 
19,211 tons ; fees received, $1675.75; office expenses, 
$39.02; divided by incumbents, $1636.73. Sent 
down. 

Superintendents of Bridges. Annual reports 
were received from Superintendents of Bridges, 
as follows: 

Chelsea Brirlge — 5 vessels have passed through 
the draw during the past year. 

Federal-street Bridge— 8764 vessels have passed 
through the draw. 

Broadway Bridge — "Whole number of vessels 
thiougli the draw from Jan. 1 to IVlay 7 (when it 
was turned off to be rebuilt), 1131. 

Meridian-street Bridge— 3020 vessels have passed 
through the draw— 2211 at night, 819 during the 
day. 

Dover-street Bridge — 6287 vessels have passed 
through the draw. 

Severally sent down. 

Chief of Police. Quarterly report to Dec. 31, 
1874— Arrests, 8073, males, '6582, females, 1491, 
Americans, 2983, foreigners, 5090, committed, 5884; 
lodgers, 17,380, males, 15,488, females, 1792, Ameri- 
cans, 6705, foreigners, 10,575; amount of property 
reported stolen, $33,539; amount of property re- 
covered, $24,331.11 ; amount of fines imposed by 
the courts, $31,985; imprisonment by the same, 
572 years, 7 mouths ; expenditures for the quarter, 
$214,734.49; balance of appropriation in treasury, 
$248,900.23; to*~al appropriation, $865,000. 

Paymaster of State Aid. Quarterly report for 
Dec. 31, 1874— Total disbursements, $21,524; bal- 
ance on hand, $424; total applicants, 4050. Sent 
;'own. 

Resignation. Communication froiu Joseph F. 
Paul, iesigning the office of Warden in Ward 10. 
Placed on file. 

City Clerk. Communication nominating John 
T. Priest as Assistant City Clerk. Confirmed. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL FOR CONCUR- 
RENCE. 

Orders for the printing of the Municipal Regis- 
ter ; requesting a copy of the Mayor's address for 
publication, and referring all unfinished business 
in the hands of joint standing committees to the 
same committees when appointed. Severally 
passed. 

RULES AND ORDERS. 

Alderman Harris, for the committee appointed 
to consider what alterations are required in the 
rules and orders of the Board of 1874 to adapt 
them for use by this Board, reported that the 
only change necessary is to strike from section 23 
the words "City Registrar's Department," inas- 
much as any committee on that department is 
rendered unnecessary by the establish uient of the 
Board of Health. They recommend the following 
order : 

Ordered, That the rules and orders of the 
Beard of Aldermen of 1874. >as printed in the 
Municipal Register of that year, be adopted as the 
rules and orders for the government of this 
Board, with this amendment : Strike out from 
section 23 the words "City Registrar's Depart- 
ment." Passed. 

ADDITIONAL WATER SUPPLY. 

Alderman Stebbius presented the following: 
Office of the Cochituate "Water Board, ) 
Boston, Jan. 7, 1875. | 
To the City Council— The Cochituate Water 
Board, that it may prbvide for the city at as early 
a day as practicable an adequate and sure supply 
of water for domestic and manufacturing uses, 
requests that appropriations for the following 



specific purposes may be made, the amount of 
each being the sum which it is estimated should 
be spent during this year: 

For storage basins on the Sudburv River $500,000 

For construction of a new conduit 1,000,000 

For an addititional siphon pipe across Charles 
River on line of the Cochituate Aqueduct 30,000 

Total $1 ,530,000 

By the action of the last City Council the Water 
Board is placed in a peculiar and embarrassing po- 
sition. It is authorized to take the Sudbury River, 
turn its waters into Lake Cochituate and to builu 
storage basins, but no sufficient provision has 
been made for meeting the cost of this work, and 
the board is expressly prohibited from taking any 
land for a new conduit and from incurring any 
expense thereon which would exceed the present 
depleted appropriation. The "Water Board have 
heretofore, in various reports to the City Council, 
called the attention to the dangerous condition of 
the existing conduit and its extreme liabdity to 
accident (involv'ng a short supply of water) from 
the strain put upon it by running it under a head. 

Messrs. Kirkwood and Francis, the eminent en- 
gineers employed by the board to examine it, sav, 
"The recent examination has shown very clearly 
that parts of the conduit are now unsafe and may 
fail at any time," and after speaking of the over- 
taxing of the conduit, and the signs of weakness 
and yielding as shown by the opening of cracks in 
the brick work, the most dangeious of which they 
recommend repairing and making safe in the 
spring of 1875, they say — 

"The conduit cannot be thoroughly overhauled 
and repaired until an independent supply of wa- 
ter is available for the city from other sources 
sufficient to admit of the Cochituate conduit being 
relieved from duty for some months. Until such 
an opportunity can he had we are of opinion that 
it should not, in its present condition, be relied on 
to convev more than 17,000,000 gallons in any one 
day." 

The conduit has been repaired in as thorough a 
manner as the limited time the water could be 
kept shut off would permit, but nothing has been 
done to strengthen it at the weak points ; yet the 
Water Board is obliged, in order to keep up the 
supply, to run much more than 17,000,000 gallons 
per day through it. In asking for an appropria- 
priation of $30,000 for an additional siphon pipe 
across Charles River, it is anticipated that it may 
be necessary, before anew conduit can be built, to 
force a delivery of twenty to twenty-three mil- 
lions of gallons per day through the old conduit 
by running it under a three or four foot head at 
the upper end. Such a use, or rather abuse of it, 
with any precautions that can be taken against 
accident, will be extremely dangerous. 

It will be seen therefore that the W ater Board, 
acting under the authority at present granted to 
it by the City Conncil, cannot provide the city 
with an ample supply of water except at a great 
risk. Storage basins on the Sudbury will be of no 
use without a new conduit to convey the water to 
the city. 

The lake, from its own watershed and the ordi- 
nary flow of the river, unaided by storage basins, 
can he kept at a height that will provide all the 
water the conduit can safely carry, though it 
should be understood that, the channel from Farm 
Pond to Lake Cochituate, and the dam for divert- 
ing the water from the river, were constructed for 
temporary purpo-es only, and are not such works 
upon which so vital an interest as the supply of 
water to the city should be allowed long to de- 
pend. 

To secure an ample supply of water,and to remove 
the difficulties under which the board labors ; to re- 
lieve it from the necessity of refusing to allow the 
u n e of water for many purposes that would in- 
crease the prosperity and give a new impulse to 
various manufacturing interests, the board be- 
lieves the construction of a new conduit is an im- 
perative necessity. 

In view of the careful and accurate surveys and 
investigations which have been made by the City 
Engineer and his assistants, the indorsement of 
the plans by Mr. Chesbrough, under whose di- 
rection the Cochituate works were built, the prox- 
imity of the line at South Natick to the Charles 
River, from which an increased supply can be 
obtained if necessary in the future, the increased 
rate of inclination above that of the Cochituate 
conduit and its favorable location on an entirely in- 
dependent line, together with the great advantage 
of having all the plans in readiness and thus being- 
able to at once put the work under contract, the 



JANUARY 



1875 



Water Board does not hesitate to reaffirm its 
opinion that the interests of the city w.ll be best 
subserved by the construction of the proposed 
conduit from Farm Pond to Chestnut Hill Reser- 
voir. 

Impressed with the importance of immediately 
commencing the work, and feeling that it would 
be remiss in its duty if it delayed an expression 
of its views, the Water Boird has thus early in 
the year presented its request for appropriations 
for the purposes mentioned. 

Two years have passed away since this question 
of a new water supply was presented to the City 
Council, and while its action during the closing 
hours of the past year has averted the threatened 
calamity of a water famine, the responsibility of 
keeping up the .supply by increasing the strain 
upon a conduit already overtaxed must rest upon 



it untill the requisite appropriations and authori- 
ty to build a new conduit are granted. 

Thos. Gogin, President. 

Laid on the table and ordered to be printed, on 
motion of Alderman Stebbins. 

JURY LIST TO BE REVISED. 

Alderman Quincy offered the following : 

Ordered, That the list of jurors in this city who 
are qualified to serve in the several courts of the 
county of Suffolk be revised by this Board, and be 
posted in the Court House and City Hall, and be 
thereafterward submitted to the Common Coun- 
cil for revision and acceptance pursuant to law. 

Read twice and passed. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins, the Board 
adjourned. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JANUARY 7, 1875. 



Regular weekly meeting at 7y 2 o'clock P. M., 
Halsey J. Boardman, President, in the chair. 

On motion, Mr. Thacher was appointed a com- 
mittee to conduct Mr. Edwards, member elect 
from Ward 15, to the City Clerk to be qualified, 
which was done, and Mr. Edwaids took his seat. 

The President announced that owing~to the un- 
avoidable abserce of Mr. Perkins of Ward 16 
from the city, he had appointed Mr. Kimball of 
Ward 6 a member of the committee to nominate 
candidates for a Finance Committee in place of 
Mr. Perkins. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN FOR 
CONCURRENCE. 

Annual reports of the Federal-street, Chelsea, 
Meridian-street, Dover-street and Broadway 
bridges; quarterly report of the Paymaster of 
State Aid; annual report of the Inspector of 
Lighters. Severally placed on file. 

Executive communication announcing the ap- 
pointment of James L. Hillard as Mayor's Clerk. 
Placed on file. 

Order authorizing ihe annual reports of city of- 
ficers to be made in print. Read twice and 
passed. 

Order appointing the members of the Board of 
Aldermen, with such as the Common Council may 
join, a Committee on State Aid to Soldiers and 
Sailors. Read twice and passed, and Jie follow- 
ing gentlemen joined to the committee on the 
part of the Common Council: Messrs. Harrigan 
of Ward 1, Bent of Ward 2, Murray of Ward 3, 
Whitmore of Ward 4, Duggan of Ward 5, Harmon 
of Ward 6, Barry of Ward 7, Hicks of Ward 8, 
Jaques of Ward 9, Smith of Ward 10, Pierce of 
Ward 11, Lappen of Ward 12, Whitcomb.of Ward 
13, Hiscock of Ward 14, Clark of Ward 15, Lori.g 
of Ward 16, Curtis of Ward 17, Moley of Ward 19, 
Trull of Ward 20, Stacey of Ward 21, and Power of 
Ward 22. 

Order for the appointment of a Joint Special 
Committee on Joint Rules and Orders of the City 
Council. Read twice and passed, and Messrs. Sib- 
ley of Ward 20, Sprague of Ward 4, and Train of 
Ward 13 joined to said committee. 

Certificate of the election of Aldermen Clark, 
Power and Stebbins members of the Committee 
on Accounts on the part of the Board of Alder- 
men. Placed on file. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED FOR RECOUNT OF VOTES. 

By Mr. Walbridge of Ward 12— Petition of Mar- 
tin L. Ham, believing that he was elected 
from W ard 12, and requesting a recount of the 
votes. 

By Mr. Harrigan of Ward 1 — Petition of Emery 
D. Leighton, believing that by a mistake in the 
returns a seat was given to Frederick Pease, and 
requesting a recount of votes. 

Severally referred to the Committeon Elections. 



ELECTION OF A FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6, for the committee to 
nominate candidates for members of the Finance 
Committee on the part of the Common Council, 
submitted a report recommending the election of 
Francis H. Peabody, Alexander Beal, John Gold- 
thwait, Eugene H. Sampson, Levi L. Willcutt, 
Francis Jaques and Curtis Guild. The report was 
accepted, and on motion of Mr. Train of Ward 13 
the Council Proceeded to an election, Messrs. 
Train of Ward 13, Sweetser of Ward 10, and Day 
of Ward 1 being appointed a committee to collect 
and count votes. They reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 69 

Necessary to a choice , 35 

Francis H. Peahody 69 

Alexander Beal 69 

John Goldthwait. 67 

Eugene H. Sampson 69 

Levi L. "W illcutt 69 

Francis Jaques 67 

Curtis Guild 69 

H. H. Sprague J 

And the nominees of the committee were declared 
elected. Sent up. 

AUDITOR'S MONTHLY EXHIBIT. 

The Auditor's monthly exhibit for January 5, 
1875 (City Doc. No. 4), was received and sent up. 
Foilowingis the state of the appropriations: 
Appropriations, 
Revenues, etc. Expended. Unexpended. 

General $13,944,990.61 $9,137,593.94 $4,807,396.67 

Special 4,823,266.89 1,788,925.56 3,034,341.33 

$18,768,257.50 $10,926,519.50 $7,841,738.00 
Sent up. 

ELECTION OF A COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 20, for the special committee 
appointed to nominate a Committee on Accounts 
on the part of the Common Council, submitted a 
report recommending the election of Frederick 
Pease, James J. Flynn, John Q. A. Brackett, Amos 
L. Noyes, and Edwin A. Woods. 

The report was accepted, and on motion of Mr. 
Willcutt of Ward 17 the Council proceeded to an 
election, Messrs. Willcutt of Ward 17, Sampson of 
Ward 10, and Harrigan of Ward 1 being appoint- 
ed a committee to collect and count votes. They 
] eported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 68 

Necessary to a choice 35 

Frederick Pease 68 

James J. Flynn 67 

J. Q. A. Brackett 68 

Amos L. N oy es 68 

Edwin H. Woods 68 

And they were declared elected. 

Mr. Page of Ward 9, for the Committee on Elec- 
tions, submitted reports as follows: 

CONTESTED SEATS. 

On petition of Henry A. Sievers et al., of Ward 
20, for a recount of votes for members of the 
Council in that ward, the committee report that 
they have recounted the original ballots with the 
following result : E. J. Trull had 420; Edwin Sib- 
ley, 365; John H. Dee, 356; Eugene Sullivan, 316; 
J ames H. Phalen, 218; James F. Dacev, 34; Frank- 
lin Hopkins, 1; Liverus Hull, 2; F. Childs,2;H. 
F. Dunnels. 1. It appears, therefore, that Ezra J . 



6 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



Trull and Edwin Sibley, who now occupy seats at 
this board, were duly elected. 

On petition of Frederick Shunk, who claimed 
the seat occupied by Nathan S.Wilbur of Ward 13, 
and requested a recount of all the ballots cast for 
members in that ward, the committee report the 
following result : William G. Train had 449 ; 
E. D. Whitcomb, 375 ; George J. Coyle, 350 ; 
Nathan S. Wilbur, 276 ; Nathan S. Wilber, 74 ; 
Wilbur, 1 ; Joseph P. Connoll, 301 ; Martin Lynch, 
325 : Fredk. Shunk, 265 ; Frederick Schunk, 
24; Frank Schunk, 1; W. Elliot Woodward, 274; 
John Osborne, Jr., 1; Edward J. Long, 1; Cyrus 
Hicks, 1 ; Bradford S. Cressy, 1 ; E. C. Kingsbury, 1 ; 
I ierpont Edwards, 1 ; W. G. Thacher, 1; Isaac P. 
Clarke. 1. Under the rules which govern such 
cases the ballots cast for Nathan S. Wilber should 
be counted for Nathan S. Wilbwr, which gives him 
a total of 350 ; and the ballots cast for Frederick 
Schunk should be counted for Frederick Shunk, 
which gives him a total of 289. It appears, there- 
fore, that Nathan S. Wilbur, who now occupies a 
seat at this board, was duly elected. 

On petition of Joseph W. Hobbs et al., repre- 
senting that they believed Francis W. Pray was 
entitled to the seat occupied Dy John Kelley, and 
request a recount of the votes in Ward 21, the 
committee report the following result of a re- 
count: John Kelley had 387; John F. Kelley, 3; 
Francis W. Pray had 341. It appears, therefore, 
that John Kelley, who received the certificate of 
election, and now occupies a seat at this board, 
was duly elected. 

Severally accepted. 

ARMY AND NAVY MONUMENT. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 offered the following : 
Ordered, That a joint special committee, con- 
sisting of three members of the Common Council 
be appointed with such as the Board of Alder- 
men may join, to have charge of t';"e erection of 
,the Aimy and Navy Monument on Boston Com- 
mon, as provided in the contract with Martin 
Milmore. 

Read twice and passed, and Messrs. Flynn of 
Ward 7, Trull of Ward 20, and Hiscock of Ward 14 
were appointed on the part of the Council. Sent 
up. 

COMMITTEES TO NOMINATE CITY OFFICERS. 

Orders were offered for the appointment of joint 
special committees to nominate city officers, 
which were severally read twice and passed, and 
the committees were a ppointed as follows (the 
member first named on each committee having 
offered the order): 

Directors of East Boston Ferries — Messrs. Page 
of Ward 9, Guild of Ward 6, Burgess of Ward 3. 

Trustees of the City Hospital — Messrs. Brackett 
of Ward 10, Pierce of Ward 11, Noyes of Ward 5. 

Members of Cochituate Water Board— Messrs. 
Woods of Ward 8, Pease of Ward 1, Sweetser 
of Ward 10. 

City Messenger— Messrs. Wilbur of Ward 13, 
Thacher of Ward 15, Day of Ward 1. 

Superintendent of Common and Public Grounds 
— Messrs. Noyes of Ward 5, Peabodv of Ward 9, 
Shaw of Ward 5. 

Weighers and Inspectors of Lighters — Messrs. 
Collins of Ward 2, Howes of Ward 11, Cushman of 
Ward 1. 

Trustees of Public Library— Messrs. Burditt of 
Ward 16, Sprague of Ward 4, Damon of Ward 12. 

Superintendent of Public Buildings— Messrs. 
Kingsbury of Ward 15, Morrison of Ward 9, Kings- 
ley of Ward 3. 

Superintendent of the Several Bridges — Messrs. 
Walbridjie of Ward 12, Fitzpatrick of Ward 7, Os- 
borne of Ward 8. 

Superintendent of Sewers— Messrs. Tbacher of 
Ward 15, Anderson of Ward 3, Coyle of Ward 13. 

Trustees of Mt. Hope Cemetery — Messrs. Long 
of Ward 8. Felt of Ward 11, Cushing of Ward 4. 



Superintendent of Streets— Messrs. Osborne of 
Ward 8, Crocker of 6, WiUcutt of Ward 17. 

City Surveyor (with authority to report to either 
branch)— Messrs. Willcutt of Ward 17, Smith of 
Ward 10, Day of Ward 1. 

Directors of Public Institutions— Messrs. Long 
of Ward 8, Cawley of Ward 2, Wilbur of Ward 13. 
The order for this committee was taken from the 
table, on motion of Mr. Sibley of Ward 20. 

Superintendent of Public Lands —Messrs. 
Thacher of Ward 15, Anderson of Ward 3, Dev- 
ereaux of Ward 22. ff- , 

Harbor Master— Me«srs. Woods of Ward 8, 
Flynn of Ward 7, Sprague of Ward 4. 

Commissioners of Cedar Grove Cemetery — 
Messrs. Long of Ward 8, Bent of Ward 2. Newton' 
of Ward 14. 

City Engineer (with authority to report to either 
branch)— Messrs. Thacher of Ward 15, Goldthwait 
of Ward 11, Curtis of Ward 17. 

Severally sent up. 

Mr. Devereaux of Ward 22 presented the peti- 
tion of W. H. Kinsman & Co., etal., merchants and 
ship owners, representing that the inspection of 
ballast is not properly attended to, and asking that 
a committee be appointed to examine into the com- 
petency of candidates for office, and that none 
may be appointed until their competency is 
shown; also petition of William S. Battis that 
he may be appointed one of said inspectors. 

Severally referred to the committee to nominate 
Inspectors of Lighters and sent up. 

NORTHAMPTON-STREET DISTRICT. 

Mr. Train of Ward 13 offered the following : 
Ordered, That five members of the Common 
Council, with such as the Board of Aldermen may 
join, be appointed to constitute the Committee 
on the Northampton-street District, with authori- 
ty to exercise all the powers conferred on the Joint 
Special Committee of the City Council on the 
Northampton-street District for the year 1874. 

Read twice and. passed, and Messrs. Train of 
Ward 13, Noyes of Ward 5, Parker of Wari 14, 
Sampson of Ward 10, and Harmon of Ward 6, were 
appointed on said committee. Sent up. 

THE DEDHAM-STREET DISTRICT. 

Mr. Tram of Ward 13 offered the following ; 

Ordered, That the Joint Special Committee on 
the Northampton-street District be requested to 
consider and report what action, if any, should be 
taken by the city in relation to raising the grade 
of the Swett-street District, so called. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 — It appears to me that that 
matter belongs properly to the Joint Committee 
on Streets. We have no authority to fill that ter- 
ritory at this time; and as the city has already 
laid out that street, it occurs to me that it should 
be referred to that committee. 

Mr. Tram of Ward 13 — I have no objection, as it 
is merely a preliminary matter. I supposed it 
was proper to put in the order for the committee 
to see whether it was expedient to do the work. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 — That matter is already in 
the hands of 1he Committee on Streets, and con- 
tracts will be made very soon for building that 
street, and of course that would be the proper 
committee to refer it to. 

Mr. Train withdrew the order. 

THE COMMON COUNCIL ANTEROOM. 

Mr. Train of Ward 13 offered the following : 

Ordered, That the officer in charge of the ante- 
room of the Common Council be instructed to ad- 
mit no one unless a member of the Council, or 
properly introduced, while this body is in session. 

Mr. Tram explained that there was generally 
considerable property left in the anteroom, and 
as there are times when the officer in charge may 
be called away, it was proper to give him the in- 
structions. 

The order was passed. 

On motion of Mr. Pease of Ward 1, the Council 
adjourned. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceeding's of the Board of Aldermen, 

JANUARY 11, 1875. 



Regular weekly meeting at four o'clock P. M., 
His Honor Mayor Cobb in the chair. 

THli STANDING COMMITTEES. 

The Chair announced the appointment of the 
following standing committees : 

Standing Committees of the Board. 

Bridges — Aldermen Power, Harris and Viles. 

County Accounts— Aldermen Harris, Stebbins 
and Quincy. 

Faneuil Hall and County Buildings— Aldermen 
Prescott, Clark and Pope. 

Lamps — Aldermen Stebbins, Quincy and Bur- 
rage. 

Licenses— Aldermen Bigelow, Stebbins and 
Viles. 

Markets, Weights and Measures — Aldermen 
Prescott, Worthington and Harris. 

Paving — Aldermen Power, Bigelow and Burrage. 

Police — Aldermen Clark, Burrage and Bigelow. 

Sewers — Alaermen Harris, Power and Viles. 

Streets— Aldermen Clark, Harris and Worthing- 
ton. 

Steam Engines — Aldermen Power, Viles and 
O'Brien. 

Joint Standing Committees. 

Armories— Aldermen Worthington, Quincy, and 
O'Brien. 

Assessors' Department— Aldermen Harris, Steb- 
bins and Pope. 

Bathing— Aldermen Power, Prescott and Pope. 

Claims— Aldermen Worthington, Quincy and 
O'Brien. 

Common, etc. — Aldermen Clark, Power and 
Quincy. 

East Boston Ferries— Aldermen Viles, Stebbins 
and Burrage. 

Engineer's Department — Aldermen Bigelow and 
Prescott. 

Fire Department — Aldermen Quincy and Bige- 
low. 

Fuel — Aldermen Pop? and O'Brien. 

Harbor — Aldermen Burrage and Harris. 

Health— Aldermen Wortbington and Viles.- 

City Hospital — Aldermen Burrage and O'Brien. 

Public Institutions— Aldermen WoitLington, 
Prescott and Pope. 

Mt. Hope Cemetery — Aldermen 
Bigelow. 

Legislative Matters — Aldermen 
Worthington . 

Ordinances— Aldermen Quincy, 
O'Brien. 

Overseers of Poor — APiermen Viles and Harris. 

Public Buildings— Aldermen Prescott, Clark and 
Pope. 

Public Instruction— Aldermen Prescott, Worth- 
ington and Quincy. 

Public Lands -Aldermen O'Brien, Stebbins and. 
Pope. 

Printing — Aldermen Power and Worthington. 

Public Library — Aldermen Quincy, Prescott and 
Bigelow, * 

Salaries— Aldermen Stebbins and Prescott. 

Streets — Aldermen Clark, Harris and Worthing- 
ton. 

Surveyor's Department— Aldermen O'Brien and 
Burrage. 

Survey and Inspection of Buildings — Aldermen 
Pope, Power and Viles. 

Treasury Department— Aldermen Bigelow and 
Burrage. 

Water— Aldermen Stebbins, Clark and Bigelow. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Committee on Streets on the part of the 
Board. John Lamb, for additional compensation 
in the matter of widening Shawmut avenue be- 
tween Lenox and Roxbury streets. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Board. James N. Cowin, for leave to occupy a 
new wooden stable for one horse on Princeton 
street, No. 19, Ward 1. 

John Trainer, for leave to occupy an old wooden 
stable for one horse on Foundry street, No. 150. 

Mellen F. Doten, for leave to occupy a new 
wooden stable for three horses on Woodville 
square, Highlands. 



Burrage and 
Stebbins and 
Bigelow and 



E. A. Noyes, for leave to occupy a stable for 100 
horses at 5-7 North Centre street. 

To the Joint Committee on Finance. Francis 
A. Hall, to be paid the value of certain coupons 
of city stock alleged to have been lost. 

To the Joint Committee on Claims. L. M. Wood, 
to be compensated for injuries sustained by his 
child while in attendance at the Fianklin School. 

To the Committee on Seivers. Ann P. Crisp et 
al., for abatement of assessment for Eden-street 
sewer. 

To the Committee on Paving. E. L. Penniman's 
heirs, to be paid for grade damages on Central 
street. 

E. W. James et al., that the thirty-third location 
of the Metropolitan Railroad in Charles street be 
revoked, 

C. Tilden, Jr., for the grade of Culvert street, 
between Cabot and Tremont streets. 

Michael C. Flusk, to be paid for grade damages 
on Dorchester avenue, near Field's Corner. 

George H. Mandell etal., that a retaining wall 
be built at the end of Berwick park. 

Abbott Lawrence, to be paid for grade damages 
to estate No. 13 Cornhill. 

John O'Hare, for the grade of Knowlton street. 

George H. Burditt et al., that Corey street be 
graded. 

EXECUTIVE NOMINATIONS CONFIRMED. 

Special Police Officers— Charles H. Rice, Daniel 
N. Gannon, Morgan Chapel and its vicinity; Reu- 
ben S. Hunt, Sudbury and Union streets and their 
vicinity. 

Constable — rtinds R. Darling. 

LOCATION ACCEPTED. 

A communication was received from the South 
Boston Railroad, accepting the location granted 
Dec. 21, 1874. Placed on file. 

COMMUNICATIONS FROM CITY OFFICERS. 

School Committee. Request for better accom- 
modations for school for dtaf mutes. Referred to 
Joint Committee on Public Instruction and sent 
down. 

Fire Commissioners. Report of fires and alarms 
for December. Sent down. 

Superintendents of Bridges. Annual reports 
were received as follows: 

Warren Bridge — Draw opened 6768 times. 

Chelsea Bridge— Draw opened 2334 times. 

Charles Kiver Bridge — Draw opened 8998 times. 

Severally sent down. 

STEAM EJSGIN3. 

The petition of Joseph W. Greenleaf , for leave 
to locate and use a steam engine of six-horse 
power at the corner of Albany and East Canton 
streets, was considered, on an order of notice to 
all parties objecting. No one appeared to object, 
and the petition was referred to the Committee on 
Steam Engines. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEES. 

Orders for the appointment of joint special 
committees lo nominate city officers and mem- 
bers of the boards of direction were received 
from the other branch, passed in concurrence, 
and the committees joined as follows: 

To Nominate Superintendents. 

Common — Aldermen Clark and Prescott. 

Public Buildings — Aldermen Clark and Viles. 

Bridges — Aldermen Viles and Burrage. 

Sewers — Aldermen Power and Bigelow. 

Streets — Aldermen Bun age and O'Brien. 

Public Lands— Aldermen Stebbins and Pope. 

City Surveyor — Aldermen Worthington ana Bur- 
rage. 

City Engineer — Aldermen Prescott and Steb- 
bins. 

Harbor Master— Aldermen Harris and O'Brien. 

City Messenger — Aldermen Power and Prescott. 

To Nominate Members of the following Boards: 
Directors of East Boston Ferries — Aldeimen Viles 

and Worthington. 
Trustees of City Hospital — Aldermen Clark and 

Harris. 
Trustees of Public Library Aldermen Bigelow 

and Worthington. 
Trustees of Mt. Hope Cemetery— Aldermen O'Brien 

and Pope. 
Directors for Public Institutions — Aldermen Quin- / 

cy and Harris. 
Cochituate Water Board— Aldermen Stebbins and 

Quincy. 
Commissioners on Cedar Grove Cemetery — Alder- 
men Pope and O'Brien. 
Weighers and Inspectors of Lighters— Alderman 

Harris and Burrage. 



JANUARY 11, 1875. 



PAPEES FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL FOE CON- 
CURRENCE. 

Certificate of election of Committee- on Finance. 
Plated on file. 

Petitions of W. H. Kinsman et at., and W. S. 
Battis. Refer/ed. 

Order for appointment of a joint special com- 
mittee (Messrs. Flynn, Trull and Hiscock to be 
joined) on the subject of the army and navy mon- 
ument. Passed, and Aldermen Pope and Quincy 
•appointed on the part of the Board. 

Order for appointment of a joint special com- 
mittee (Messrs. Train, Noyes, Parker Sampson and 
Harmon to be joined) on the improvement of the 
Northampton-street district. Passed, and Alder- 
men Stebbins, O'Brien and Pope appointed on 
said committee. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF LAMPS. 

The annual report of the Superintendent of 
Lamps for 1874 (City Doc. No. 5) was received and 
sent down. 

The price paid for gas for public lamps is as fol- 
lows : 

City proper, five-sixth of one cent per hour, or 
$2.08% per thousand feet. 

South Boston, one cent per hour, or $2.59 per 
thousand feet. 

East Boston, one cent per hour, or $2.50 per 
thousand feet. 

Roxbury, one cent per hour, or $2.50 per thou- 
sand feet. 

Dorchester, one and two-tentlis of one cent 
per hour, or $3.00 per thousand feet. 

Brookline, one and one-tenth of one cent per 
hour, or $2.75 per thousand feet. 

Brighton, one ana one-tenth of one cent per 
hour, or $2.75 ner thousand feet. 

West Roxbury, one and two-tenths of one cent 
per hour, or $3.00 per thousand feet. 

Charlesto^vn, one cent per hour, or $2.50 per 
thousand feet. 

The department employs 125 men and there are 
no supernumerary men, and there are 9346 public 
lamps in the whole city. 
The balance of appropriation on hand from 

1873, on the 1st of January, 1874, was $125,925.35 

There was expended during the remainder of 

the financial year 320,685.81 



The balance unexpended and transferred to 

other appropriations was $5,233.54 

The appropriation for the financial year end- 
ing on the 30th of April next, was $455,500.00 

Amount expended to date 319,959.97 

Balance unexpended $135,540.03 

An amount sufficient to meet all anticipated ex- 
penditures of the department for the remainder 
of the financial year. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF POLICE. 

The annual report of the chief of police (City 
Doc. No. 6) was received and sent down. 

Theie are now in the department 66* men, rank 
and file, the general divisions being the central 
office in City Hall, and fifteen divisions. 

The work of the police f^r the year is thus 
classified : 
Arrests 29,799 ' Lodgers 58.449 



Males 41,48K 

Females 0,903 

Americans 22,424 

Foreigners 30,025 

Non-residents 46.501 

Minors 8,008 



$69,608.24 
$78,485.00 



$86,150.53 
$73,559.00 



Males 23,763 

Females 6,036 

Americans 10,9b7 

Foreigners 18,802 

Non-residen ts 5,961 

Minors 5,422 

Committed 20,862 

Amount of property taken from prison- 
era and lodgers and restored to them. .. 
Amount of property reported stolen in 

the city 

Amount of property recovered which 

was stolen in and out of the city 

Amount of fines imposed by the courts.. . 

Amount of imprisonment by the same.. .2135 yfs. 8 mos 

Number of days' attendance in court by 

officers 16,916 

Amount of witness fees earned by them. $19,282.07 

Amount received for dog licenses $13,052.50 

The largest items in the nature of crime are — 
assault and battery, 2156; common drunkards, 
346; disorderly, 6198: disturbing the peace, 419; 
drunkenness, 11,892; fornication, 111; fraud. 102: 
gambling, 83; gaming on the Lord's Day, 159; 
housebreaking, 71; idle and disorderly, 227; in- 
sane, 214; simple larceny, 1348; felonious larceny, 
659; malicious mischief, 321; night walking, 127; 
shopbreaking, 232; suspicion of larceny, 353; sus- 
picious persons, 1490; violation of liquor law, 23; 
violation of Sunday law, 212; violation of city or- 
dinances, 540. 



Of the prisoners 11.096 were born in the United 
States, 1155 in the British Provinces, 118 in Cana- 
da, 14,680 in Ireland, 1161 in England, 534 in Ger- 
many, 417 in Scotland. 

All the improvements made in the department 
during the year are recited and commended for 
their efficient working. 

Of the lodgers 22,578 were natives of the United 
States, 3184 of the British Provinces, 280 of Cana- 
da, 24,108 of Ireland, 4916 of England, 337 of 
France, 727 of Germany, ani 1554 of Scotland. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS REFERRED. 

Alderman Power offered the following: 
Ordered, That the several standing committees 
of this Board resume the unfinished business of 
the last year which is appropriate to said commit- 
tees, and which is hereby referred accordingly. 
Passed. 

DIRECTORS FOR PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS. 

Alderman Power submitted the following: 

The Board of Directors for Public Institutions 
respectfully request that section 7 of the ordi- 
nance of December 12, 1862, in relation to this 
board (see Laws and Ordinances, 1869, page 403), 
.may he amended by striking out the following 
words : 

'•When the supplies or materials to be obtained 
exceed in value the sum of $300, the board shall 
advertise in the newspapers employed by the city 
to publish its advertisements for sealed proposals 
to furnish such supplies or materials, describing 
particulai ly the quality and quantity required, 
and the times and places of delivery.' Such pro- 
posals as may be received shall be opened at a 
public meeting of the board and the contracts 
shall be awaided to the lowest bidder; provided, 
the board shall deem it for the best interest of the 
city, and the peison contracting shall furnish sat- 
isfactory security for the faithful performance of 
the contract." 

The directors also further request that section 
8 of the same ordinance, may be so amended as 
to require from theboard an annual report only. 
' J. P. Beadlee, President. 

Referred, on motion of Alderman Power, to the 
Joint Committee on Ordinances and sent down. 

reference of topics in the mayor's address. 

Alderman Stebbins, for the joint special com- 
mittee to consider what disposition shall be made 
of the several topics in the Mayor's address, sub- 
mitted a report recommending the passage of the 
accompanying orders. In preseniing the order 
requesting the Mayer to petition for authority to 
take lands for parks, the committee express' no 
opinion upon the expediency of establishing pub- 
lic parks at this time ; but they desire to bring the 
question directly before the City Council in sea- 
son to secure legislative action at this session if it 
should be deemed advisable: 

Ordered, That so much of the Mayor's address 
as relates to a reorganization of the police force 
be referred to the Committee on Police of the 
Board of Aldermen. 

Passed and sent down. 

Ordered, That so much of the Mayor's addiess 
, as relates to the preparation of a general plan 
for street improvement m the outlying sections of 
the city be referred to the Board of Street Com- 
missioners. 

Passed and sent down. 

Ordered That so much of the Mayor's address as 
relates to the Law Department be referred to the 
Joint Standing Committee on Ordinances; that so 
much as relates to an additional supply of pure 
water be referred to the Joidt Standing Commit- 
tee on Water; and that so much as relates to the 
public institutions be referred to the Joint Stand- 
ing Committee on Public Institutions. 

Passed and sent down. 

Ordered, That so much of the Mayor's address 
as relates to the census and the divi-ion of the 
wards in this city be referred to a joint special 
committee, consisting of two Aldermen and three 
Councilmen. 

Passed, and Aldermen Quincy and Viles ap- 
pointed on said committee. Sent down. 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor he request- 
ed to appoint three commissioners to investigate 
and repott (1) upon the quality and price of the 
gas furnished in this city, as compared with other 
large cities in this country and Europe; (2) 
whether any improvements can be made in the 
present methods of manufacturing gas by the 
different companies in this city; (3) whether it 
would be expedient for the city to undertake the 
manufacture and supply of gas for public and 



9 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



private lighting; and (4) whether any fur- 
ther legislation is desirable to enable gas consum- 
ers, or the municipal authorities, to secure a 
prompt and impartial investigation of complaints 
against private companies, and an efficient rem- 
edy fo 1 ' any abuses of which they may oe found 
guilty ; said commissioners to serve without com- 
pensation, the personal and clerical expenses in- 
curred by them in making the investigations to 
be paid, upon the approval of the Mayor, from 
the appropriation for Incidentals. 

Read once. 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to petition the General Court, now in session, 
for the passege of an act authorizing the city to 
purchase, or otherwise take, lands within the 
limits of the city for the purpose of laying out 
public parks; and also authorizing the assess- 
ment of betterments upon the adjoining lands 
benefited by the establishment of such parks. 

Read once, and specially assigned, on motion of 
Alderman Stebbins, to Monday next at five 
o'clock P. M. 

Ordered, That so much of the Mayor's address 
as relates to the Centennial Celebration be referred 
to a joint special committee, consisting of two* 
Aldermen and three Councilmen. 

Passed, and Aldermen Harris and Stebbins ap- 
pointed on said committee. Sent down. 

THE FARM POND CONDUIT. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins, the request of 
the Cochituate Water Board for an appropriation 
of $1,530,000, for a new conduit, a new siphon, and 
for construction of storage basins on Sudbury 
River (City Doc. No. 7), was taken from the table 
and referred to the Joint Standing Committee on 
W ater and sent down. 



THE POST-OFFICE SQUARE. 

Alderman Clark presented various petitions 
that the name of Post Office square be changed to 
Farragut square, and on his motion it was v6ted 
to give the petitioners a hearing before the full 
Board on Monday next, at half-past four o'clock. 
The petitions presented were as follows: 

A. H. Rice and others, merchants; 

John Simmons and others, abutters and owners ; 

General Burt, postmaster ; 

Loyal Legion, U.S.; 

U. S. sailors and marines residing in this dis- 
trict ; 

Admiral Steedman and other naval officers re- 
siding in Boston ; 

Citizens of Charlestown District ; 

Judge Devens et al., members of Grand Army 
of thj Republic. 

COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS. 

Alderman Stebbins announced that the Com- 
mittee on Accounts of this Board bad organized 
by the election of Alderman Clark as chairman. 

."LICENSES. 

Alderman Bigelow, for the Committee on Li- 
censes, submitted reports as follows: 

Amusement License Granted — Leathe, Clark & 
Co., to give entertainments at Institute Hall; 
Frank Eckland et al., to give concert at Wait's 
Hall, Jan. 25. 

Auctioneers Licensed— D. C. Sisson & Co., 22 
School street ; John R. Wolston, Chelsea street 
(renewal). 

Billiard License Granted — Valentine Harding, 
73 Dover street. 

Severally accepted. 

On motion of Alderman Clark, the Board ad- 
journed. 



10 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JANUARY 14, 1875. 



Regular weekly meeting at half-past seven 
o'clock P. M., Halsev J. Boardnian, President, in 
the chair. 

THE WARD ONE CONTESTED SEAT. 

On motion of Mr. Page of Ward 9 the rule was 
suspended and Mr. Page submitted a report from 
the Committee on Elections, on petition of Enaery 
D. Leighton, for a recount of the votes cast for 
himself and Frederick Pease, that the result of a 
recount shows that Emery D. Leighton had 855 
votes and Frederick Pease had 844 votes, and it 
appears that Mr. Leiahton is entitled to the seat 
now occupied by Mr. Pease. The committee rec- 
ommend the passage of the accompanying resolu- 
tion: 

Whereas, It appears from a recount of the origi- 
nal ballots cast at the last municipal election in 
Ward 1, that Emery D. Leighton was elected a 
member of the Common Council from said ward, 
in place of Frederick Pease, who received a certi- 
ficate of election; therefore, 

Resolved, That Emery D. Leighton is entitled 
to the seat at this Board now occupied by Fred- 
erick Pease. 

The resolve was read twice and passed. 

MEMBERS SWORN IN. 

On motion, Mr. Thacher of Ward 15 was appoint- 
ed a committee to conduct Messrs. Peabody of 
Ward 9 and Leighton of Ward 1 before the Mayor 
to be qualifie ', which was done, and those gentle- 
men took the seats assigned them. 

THE STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Orders for the appointment of the joint stand- 
ing committees were received, read twice and 
passed in concurrence, and the President an- 
nounced the members thereof on the part of the 
Common Council. 

Before announcing the committees the Presi- 
dent said — 

A very brief explanation before announcing the 
members of the joint standing committees on 
the part of the Common Council may not be inap- 
propriate. By common consent there are only 
very few committees within the province of the 
Chair to appoint at this time which are regarded 
as desirable, and it is usual when a member 
desires to be upon any committee it is one 
where there is a large amount of work com- 
ing within the domain of that committee. It 
has always been regarded that seniority in office 
or previous service on some committtes, and the 
representatives of the different sections of th<3 
city should be taken into account in making the 
selection. It is therefoie out of the question that 
every member should be recognized upon impor- 
tant committees, but the Chair has been governed 
by tie considerations which have been stated, 
and the members may judge for themselves of the 
satisfaction he may have given. He is satisfied, 
however, that he has tried laboriously to be gov- 
erned by those considerations as well as the pecu- 
liar fitness of the members for the various posi- 
tions to which they have been assigned. Inas- 
much as there are not enough committees to be 
appointed at this time to allow each member to 
be uooii more than two committees, the Chair has 
appointed no one member upon more than two 
committees, and he has also made no member 
chairman of more than one committee. 

The several joint standing committees, as thus 
completed, are appended : 

Joint Standing Committees. 

Armories — Aldermen Worthington, Quincv and 
O'Brien; Councilmen— Trull of Wara 20, Hiscock 
of Ward 14, Woods of Ward 8, Barry of Ward 7, 
Rice of Ward 19. 

Assessors' Department— Aldermen Harris, Steb- 
bins and Pope ; Councilmen — Burgess of Ward 3, 
Kingsbury of Ward 15, Harrigan of Ward 1, Cur- 
tis of Ward 17, and Hicks of Ward 8. 

Bathing— Aldermen Power, Prescott and Pope; 
Councilmen— Walbridge of Ward 12, Parker of 
Ward 14, Mooney of Ward 2, Harmon of Ward 6 
and Fitzpatrick of Ward 7. 



Claims— Aldermen Worthington, Quincy and 
O'Brien; Councilmen— Thacher of Ward 15, 
Brackett of Ward 10, Fitzgerald of Ward 7, Train 
of Ward 13, and Kimball of Ward 6. 

Common, etc.— Aldermen Clark, Power and 
Quincy; Councilmen— Shaw of Ward 5, Collins of 
Ward 2, Guild of Ward 6, Edwards of Ward 15, 
and dishing of Ward 4. 

East Boston Ferries— Aldermen VUes, Stebbins 
and Burrage ; Councilmen Day of Ward 1, Bent 
of Ward 2, Newton of Ward 14, . Felt of Ward 11, 
andLappenof Ward 12. 

Engineer's Department— Aldermen Bigelow and 
Prescott; Councilmen Curtis of Ward 17, Murray 
of Ward 3, and Fitzpatrick of Ward 7. 

Fire Department— Aldermen Quincy and Bige- 
low; Councilmen Smith of Ward 10, Howes of 
Ward 11, and Collins of Ward 2. 

Fuel— Aldermen Pope and O'Brien ; Councilmen 
Lappen of Ward 12, Kiugsley of Ward 3, and Moo- 
ney of Ward 2. 

Harbor— Aldermen Burrage and Harris; Coun- 
cilmen Anderson of Ward 3, Duggan of Ward 5, 
and Whitcomb of Ward 13. 

Health— Alderman Worthington and Viles; 
Councilmen Perkins of Ward 16, Flynn of Ward 7, 
and Sibley of Ward 20. 

City Hospital— Aldermen Burrage and O'Brien; 
Councilmen Jaques of Ward 9, Clarke of Ward 15, 
aad Howes of Ward 11. 

Public Institutions— Aldermen Worthington, 
Prescott and Pope; Councilmen Woode of Ward 8, 
Beal of Ward 16, Thacier of Ward 15, Burgess of 
Ward 3, and Damon of Ward 12. 

Mt. Hope Cemetery— AldermeD Burrage and 
Bigelow; Councilmen Newton of Ward 14, Perkins 
of Ward 16, and Osborne of Ward 8. 

Legislative Matters— Aldermen Stebbins and 
Worthington ; Councilmen Brackett of Ward 10. 
Shaw of Ward 5, and Wilson of Ward 12. 

Ordinances — Aldermen Quincy, Bigelow and 
O'Brien ; Councilmen Kimball of 'Ward 6, Crocker 
of Ward 6, Fitzgerald of Ward 7, Sprague of Ward 
4, and Pierce of Ward 11. 

Overseers of Poor— Aldermen Viles and Harris; 
Councilmen Barry of War! 7, Sweetser of Ward 
10, and Day of Ward 1. 

Public Buildings— Aldermen Prescott, Clark 
and Pope ; Councilmen Burditt of Ward 16, Morri- 
son of Ward 9, Cushman of Ward 1, Wilbur of 
Ward 13, and Stacey of Ward 21. 

Public Instruction — Aldermen Prescott, Worth- . 
ingion and Quincy; President of the Council, ex- 
officio, andMessi s. Page of Ward 9, Willcutt of 
Ward 17, Loring of Ward 16, and dishing of 
Ward 4. 

Public Lands— Aldermen O'Brien, Stebbins and 
Pope; Councilmen Crocker of Ward 6, Sibley of 
Ward 20, Goldthwait of Ward 11, Moley of Ward 
19, and Clarke of Ward 15. 

Printing — Aldermer) Power and Worthington ; 
Councilmen Wadsworth of Ward 4, Kingsbury 
of Ward 15, and Duggan of Ward 5. 

Public Library — Aldermen Quincy. Prescott and 
Bigelow; Councilmen Sprague of Ward 4, Felt of 
Ward 11, Guild of Ward 6, Loring of Ward 16, and 
Whitmore of Ward 4. 

Salaries — APJermen Stebbins and Prescott; 
Councilmen Cushman of Ward 1, Anderson of 
Ward 3, and Walbridge of Ward 12. 

Streets— Aldsrmen Clark, Harris and Worth- 
ington; Councilmen Flynn of Ward 7, Burditt of 
Ward 16, Page of Ward 9, Willcutt of Ward 17, 
and Cawley of W ard 2. 

Surveyor's Department — Aldermen O'Brien and 
Burrage ; Councilmen Long of Ward 8, Walsh of 
Ward 5, and Coyle of Ward 13. 

Survey and Inspection of Buildings— Aldermen 
Pope, Power and Viles; Councilmen Cawley of 
Ward 2, Goldthwait of Ward 11, Morrison of 
Ward 9, Smith of Ward 10, and Long of Ward 8. 

Treasury Department — Aldermen Bigelow and 
Burrage; Councilmen Peaborly of Ward 9, Parker 
of Ward 14, and Osboriie of Ward 8. 

Water — Aldermen Stebbins, Clark and Bigelow; 
Councilmen Sweetser of Ward 10, Wilbur of Ward 
13, Wilson of Ward 12, Edwards of Ward 15, and 
Leighion of Ward 1. 

Standing Committees of the Common Council. 
Police— Messrs. Moley of Ward 19, Devereaux of 
Ward 22, Murray of Ward 3, Whitcomb of 
Ward 13, and Power of Ward 22. 

Paving— Messrs. Beal of Ward 16, Harrigan of 
Ward 1, Pierce of Ward 11, Kelley of Ward 21, 
and Walsh of Ward 5. 

Judiciary— Messrs. Kimball of Ward 6, Crocker 
of Ward 6, Fitzgerald of Ward 7, Sprague of 
Ward 4, and Pierce of Ward 11. 



JANUARY 14L, 1875 



11 



PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OP ALDERMEN FOR 
CONCURRENCE. 

Annual reports of superintendents of Warren, 
Charles-River, Washington-avenue and Chelsea 
bridges; annual reports of the Superintendent of 
Lamps and Chief of Police, and report of tires 
and alarms for December. Severally placed on 
file. 

Request of School Committee for better accom- 
modations for school for deaf mutes; petitions of 
L. M. Wood and F. A. Hall, and requests of Di- 
rectors for Public Institutions for change in or- 
dinance relating to that department, and of Co- 
chituate Water Board' for an appropriation to 
build storage reservoirs on Sudbury River and 
conduit to Farm Pond. Severally referred. 

Report and orders on topics in Mayor's address, 
viz. — 

1. Referring so much as relates to the prepara- 
tion of a general plan for street improvements in 
outlying sections to the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners. 

2. Referring so much as relates to the Law De- 
partment to the Committee on Ordinances; so 
much as relates to an additional supply of pure 
water to the Committee on Water; so much as re- 
lates to the public institutions to the Committee 
on Public Institutions. 

3. Referring so much as relates to the census 
and the division of wards to a joint special com- 
mittee. 

4. Referring so much as relates to the Centen- 
nial Celebration of the Battle of Bunker Hill to 
joint special committee. 

The report was accepted, and the orders several- 
ly read twice and passed. Messrs. Whitmore of 
Ward 4, Cawley of Ward 2, and Perkins of Ward 
16 were joined to the Committee on the Censtis 
and the Division of Wards; and Messrs. Sibley of 
Ward 26, Sampson of Ward 10, and Clarke of Ward 
15 to the Committee on the Centennial Celebra- 
tior . 

PETITION PRESENTED. 

By Mr. Anderson of Ward 3 — Petition of 
Charlestown Cadets for an allowance for repairs 
on armory. 

Referred to Joint Committee on Armories and 
sent up. 

CHAIRMAN OF FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Mr. Goklthwait of Ward 11 reported that the 
Finance Committee of the Common Council had 
organized by the choice of Mr. Peabody of Ward 
9 as chairman. Accepted. 

RULES AND ORDERS OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 20 submitted a report [City 
Doc. No. 11], from the committee to prepare 
rules and orders ef the Common Council, and on 
his motion it was laid on the table. 

The changes in the rules of last year are as fol- 
lows : 

No member, having obtained the floor, shall 
speak more than fifteen minutes, without permis- 
sion of the Council. 

No member shall speak more than twice on one 
question, if objection is made, without first ob- 
taining leave of the Council. [This rule was 
adopted last year, but subsequently rescinded.] 

CONTESTED SEATS. 

Mr. Page of Ward 9, for the Committee on Elec- 
tions, submitted reports as follows: 

On petition of Martin L. Ham, claiming the 
seat now occupied by James A. Lappen of Ward 
12, the committee report the result of a recount 
of the original ballots to be— Frederick G. Wal- 
bridge, including 88 for F. G. Walbridge, 900; 
George L Damon, 740; Henry. W. Wilson, in- 
cluding 15 for H. W. Wilson, and 1 for Henry Wil- 
son, 738; James A. Lappen, 680; Martin L. Ham, 
667; Martin F. Gl\nn, including 47 for M. F. 
Glvnn, 562; John Howard, 543; Stanley Gore, 467; 
William E. Bartlett, including 55 for W. E. Bart- 
lett and 1 for William Bartlett, 250; William P. 
Cherrington, including 13 for W. P. Cherrington, 

68; Cherrington, 1; Horace W. Stickney, 5; 

Julius Adams, 1 ; Alonzo Warren, 1. It appears, 
therefore, that Frederick G. Walbridge, George 
L. Damon, Henry W. Wilson and James A. Lap- 
pen, who now occupy seats at this board, were 
duly elected. Accepted. 

On petition of Thomas Haney, claiming the seat 
of Patrick Barry of Ward 7, tlie committee report 



the following result of a recount of the ballots for 
those persons : Patrick Barry had 348 votes; P. 
Barry, 58 ; Thomas Haney, 395 ; T. Haney, 1 ; Haney, 
1. It appears, therefore, that the whole number 
of votes to which Patriek Barry is entitled is 406, 
and the whole number to which Thomas Haney is 
entitled is 396. A hearing was given to the con- 
testant on his representation that illegal votes 
were cast for Mr. Barry, and that certain fraudu- 
lent and wrongful acts were committed by the 
ward officers in receiving and counting the bal- 
lots; but the committee are of the opinion that 
the testimony presented failed tos ustain the alle- 
gations, and they recommend that the petitioner 
have leave to withdraw. Accepted. 

NOMINATIONS OF CITY OFFICERS. 

Mr. Page of Ward 9 submitted a report, in part, 
from the joint special committee to nominate 
candidates for directors of East Boston ferries 
recommending the election of Solomon B. Steb- 
bms on the part of the Board of Aldermen, and 
Rufus Cushman and Nathan S. Wilbur on the 
part of the Common Council. 

The report was accepted and the nominations 
were laid over. 

Mr. Long of Ward 8 submitted a report, in part, 
from the joint special committee to nominate 
candidates for trustees of Mount Hope Cemetery, 
recommending the election of Abraham O. Bige- 
low on the part of the Board of Aldermen, and 
Augustus Parker and John Sweetser on the part 
of the Common Council. 

The report was accepted. 

Subsequently Mr. Long of Ward 8 moved a sus- 
pension of the rule that an election for trustees of 
Mount Hope Cemetery might be had. It was op- 
posed by Messrs. Crocker and Kimball of Ward 6, 
who thought the rule a good one and it should not 
be suspended unless for special reasons. 

The motion was lost. 

HIGH SERVICE. 

Mr. Willcutt of Ward 17 offered the foPowing: 
Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on 
Water be requested to prepare and submit to the 
City Council a plan for supplying water to those 
portions of the city above the grade of two hun- 
dred feet above mean low water. 

Referred to Joint Committee on Water and sent 
down. 

VACANCIES ON COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Woods of Ward 8 called attention to the va- 
cancy in the joint special committee to nominate 
members of the Cochituate Water Board, caused 
by the recount of votes in Ward 1, and the presi- 
dent appointed Mr. Kingsbury of Ward 15 to fill 
the vacancy. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 called attention to the va- 
cancy in' the Committee on Accounts, caused by 
the unseating of Mr. Pease of Ward 1, and on his 
motion the matter was referred to the special 
committee to nominate candidates for members 
of the Committee en Accounts. 

APPROVAL OF BILLS. 

Mr. Page of Ward 9 offered the following: 
Ordered, That the President of the Common 
Council be authorized to approve bills for ex- 
penses incurred by the Common Council and the 
standing committees of the Common Council 
not having charge of any appropriation of 
money ; also by individual members of this Coun- 
cil while engaged in the discharge of official duty ; 
the amount of said bills to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for Contingent Expenses of the Com- 
mon Cornell. 
Read twice and passed. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Long of Ward 8 offered an order for a joint 
special committee to nominate a Water Regi rrar. 
Read twice and passed, and Messrs. Long of Ward 
8, Bent of Ward 2, and Smith of Ward 10 were ap- 
pointed on the part of the Common Council. 

Mr. Long of Ward 8 offered an order for a joint 
special committee to nominate a candidate for 
City Solicitor. Read twice and passed, and Messrs. 
Long of Ward 8, Kimball of Ward 6, and Fitzger- 
ald of Ward 7 were appointed on the part of the 
Common Council. 

Severally sent up. 

On motion of Mr. Noyes of Ward 5, the Council 
adjourned. 



12 



CITY (GOVERNMENT 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

JANUARY 16, 1875. 



Special meeting called by his Honor the Mayor, 
who presided. 

THE DEATH OF THE, CITY TREASURER. 

The following; was received and read : 

Executive Department, City Hall, ) 
Boston, 16th January, 1875. 

To the Honorable the City Council : Gentle- 
men — It is my painful duty to call you together in 
special session to receive the official announce- 
ment of the death of Frederic U. Tracy, late City 
Treasurer, which occurred in this city on the 14th 
inst. The city has lost a devoted and faithful 
servant. 

Many millions of money have passed through 
his hands, and I am not aware that there has ever 
been a dollar lost to the city through any act or 
neglect of his. Always at his post of duty, he has 
been an example to his subordinates in all the 
virtues pertaining to their very responsible posi- 
tions. 

Firm and incorruptible in his integrity, we all 
had an unquestioning confidence in him, and 
probably no man ever ventured to approach him 
with a dishonest or equivocal suggestion. We 
shall be fortunate indeed, if, with the greatest 
care in the selection, we can make good to the 
lity the loss sustained in the death of Mr. Tracy. 
Samuel C. Cobb, Mayor. 

Alderman Bigelow submitted the following, 
which were unanimously adopted by a rising 
vote: 

Resolved, Th&t the City Council have learned 
with profound sorrow the death of Frederic U. 
Tracy, the Treasurer of the city of Boston, and 
they desire to testify in the fullest and most sin- 
cere manner their sense of the great loss which 
the city has sustained in his decease. For nearly 
a quarter of a century the members of the suc- 
cessive City Councils which have sustained him 
in the position of Treasurer have always found 
v him faithful to his great trusts, urbane and civil 
in his deportment, and so correct and systematic 
in his accounts, that he secured the unqualified 
confidence of the community, and contributed in 
no small degree to the unquestioned reputation 
which the credit of the city now enjoys. 

Resolved, That in recognition of his valuable 
services, and as a mark of respect due i.o the de- 
ceased, a joint special committee be appointed to 
represent the City Council at the funeral of Mr. 
Tracy, and that bis Honor the Mayor, the Chair- 
man of the Board of Aldermen and the President 
of the Common Council be requested to unite with 
said committee on this occasion. 



Ordered, That a copy of these resolutions be 
transmitted to the family of the deceased. 

The Chair appointed Aldermen Bigelow and 
Burrage members of the special committee on 
the part of the Board to attend the funeral, and 
the communication, resolutions and order were 
sent down. 

city treasurer pro tem. 

The Chair read the following : 

City Solicitor's Office, \ 
30 Pemberton square, [ 
Boston, Jan. 15, 1875. ) 
Sir — I take occasion to repeat in writing what I 
said to you orally this morning, that in my 
opinion the Board of Aldermen is authorized by 
the 42d section of the 18th chapter of the General 
Statutes, to appoint a Treasurer pro tempore, that 
office being now vacant by the death of the late 
incumbent. By the General Statutes, chapter 3, 
section 7, clause 17, the word town, in any statute, 
includes cities; and by the 33d section of the City 
Charter the Board of Aldermen is invested with 
all the powers of Selectmen. 
I am, very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. P. Healy. 
Hon. Samuel C. Cqbb, Mayor. 

Alderman Bigelow submitted a report from the 
Joint Committee on the Treasury Department, 
recommending the election of Charles H. Denniet 
City and County Treasurer pro tempore, and tha. 
he be required to give bonds in the sum of $50,000, 
Accepted. 

On motion of Alderman Bigelow, the Board pro- 
ceeded to the election of a Treasurer pro tem. 
Aldermen Bigelow and Quincy were appointed a 
committee to receive, sort and count votes. They 
reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 11 

Necessary to a choice 6 

Charles H. Dennie had 11 

And he was declared elected. 

Alderman Stebbins offered the following: 

Ordered, That a message be sent to the Com- 
mon Countil to inform that branch that this 
Board have appointed Charles H. Dennie City 
Treasurer pro tempore. 

Passed and sent down. 

Alderman Burrage offered the following: 

Ordered, That the subject of selecting a candi- 
date for the office of City Treasurer be referred to 
the Joint Standing Committee on the Treasury 
Department, and that said committee be instruct- 
ed to consider the expediency of increase the 
amount of the official bonds of that officer. 

Passed and sent down. 

Alderman Bigelow offered the following : 

Ordered, That Charles H. Dennie, City and 
County Treasurer, be required to give bonds, with 
sufficient sureties, in the penal sum of $50,000. 

Passed. 

On motion of Alderman Clark, the Board ad- 
journed. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JANUARY 10, 1875. 



Special meeting, called by the Mayor ; Halsey J. 
Boardman, President, in thie chair. 

THE LATE CITY TREASURER. 

The following papers were received from the 
Board of Aldermen : 

Executive communication, announcing the 
death of Frederic U. Tracy, late City Treasurer. 
Placed on file. 

Resolutions of respect for the memory of Fred- 
eric U. Tracy, and raising a joint special commit- 



tee to attend the funeral, with an order for the 
transmission of the resolutions to the family of 
the deceased. Severally read twice and unani- 
mously passed, in concurrence, by a rising vote. 
The President joined the members of the Joint 
Committee on the Treasury Department on the 
part of the Council to the joint special commit- 
tee to attend the funeral, viz., Messrs. Peabody of 
Ward 9, Parker of Ward 14, and Osborne of Ward 8. 

Order referring the subject of selecting a candi- 
date for the office of City Treasurer to the Joint 
Committee on the Treasury Department, with in- 
structions to consider the expediency of increas- 
ing the official bonds of that officer. Read twice 
and passed, in concurrence. 

Message informing the Council of the election 
of Charles H. Dennie City Treasurer pro tem. 
Placed on file. 

On motion of Mr. Burditt of Ward 16, the Coun- 
cil adjourned. 



13 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



GITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

JANUARY 18, 1875. 



Regular weekly meeting; at four o'clock P. M., 
his honor, Mayor Cobb, presiding. 

EXECUTIVE NOMINATIONS CONFIRMED. 

Special Police Officers— John D. Pierce, Web- 
ster Hall ; John E. McCarthy, Department of Pub- 
lic Institutions. 

Weigher of Coal— Ottwell J. Wood. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Committee on Streets on the part of the 
Board. Clarissa J. Kittreilge et al., for reduction 
of betterment for the extension of Washington 
street. 

To the Committee on Common on the ■part of the 
Board. E. C. Millett, for the removal of four 
trees from Riowl's avenue and Ashland street, 
Ward 17. 

To the Joint Committee on Survey and Inspec- 
tion of Buildings. C. J. Donovan & Co., for 
leave to erect a wooden building on Bartlett place, 
off Norfolk avenue, Ward 13. 

To the Committee on Licenses. John C. Stiles, 
for ch inge in omnibus route. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of. the 
Board. David H. Jones, for leave to occupy a 
new wooden stable for one horse on Porter street, 
No. 11, Wardl. 

To the Committee on Claims. Tbomas A. Kel- 
ley, to be paid for injury to nis horse and vehicle 
on account of alleged defect in Ninth street. 

To the Committee on Paving. Edward Lee 
Childs, to be paid for grade damages at 30 Kilby 
street. 

M. Ellis & Co., for leave to move a wooden 
building from Front street to Dorrance street, 
Charlestown. 

Edward D. Sohier et al., trustees, to be paid for 
gr>ide damages on Kilby street. 

Thomas Manning et al., to be paid for grade 
damages at Nos. 6, 8 and 10 Oliver street. 

Thomas Gaffield etal., for cross walk on Hano- 
ver street, near Washington street. 

BONDS APPROVED. 

The bonds of Charles H. Dennie, City Trea. urer 
pro tern., and Hinds R. Darling and N. G. Lynch, 
constables, were presented duly certified and 
approved by th>: Board. 

COMMUNICATIONS FROM CITY OFFICERS. 

Superintendent of Maiden Bridge. Vessels 
passed thiough the draw, 993. Sent down. 

Resignatuns. Communications from Luther H. 
Wightman, resigning the office of Cleik of Ward 
4; ami from John C. Kelly, resigning the office ot 
Inspector of Elestions in Ward 14. Severally 
placed on file. 

PETITIONS FOR STEAM ENGINES. 

Petitions for leave to use steam engines by Fifty- 
Associates on Washington street near Elm street, 
and heirs of Solomon Wildes on Washington 
street extension, were received, and orders of no- 
ticed passed for hearings i hereon to all parties ob- 
jec f ing on Monday, Feb. 8, at four o'clock P. M. 

The petition of George H. Ellis foi leave to lo- 
cate and use a steam engine and boiler at 7 Tre- 
mont place was cousideied on an order of notice. 
No one appeared to object, and the petition was 
refeired to the Committee on Steam Engines. 

ANNUAL REPORT OP STREET COMMISSIONERS. 

The annual repoit(City Doc. No. 9) of this board 
was received and sent down. 

The total estimated expense of laying out and 
wiaening streets by order of the board'has been 
$729,000, and quite a large number of streets have 
been laid out at no expense to the city. The fol- 
lowing betterments nave been assessed during the 
year: 

For widening Cottage street, Dorchester $13,783.00 

Pond " " 2,142.00 

" extending South Market street to Atlan- 
tic avenue 7K.148.00 

" widening Bedford street 8,062.00 

" " and extending Emerson street. 4,070.00 

" extending Devonshire street 74,250.00' 

" widening Pynchon 5,833.00 

" extending Washington street 528,330.00 

" widening Warren street 18,410.50 

" improvements in the Burnt District 171,405.00 

Total 8303,333.50 



PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL, FOR CON- 
CURRENCE. 

Order for appointment of a joint committee to 
nominate a City Solicitor. Passed, and Aldermen 
Prescott anil Quincy appointed on the part of the 
Board. 

Order for appointment of a joint committee to 
nominate a Water Registrar. Passed, and Alder- 
men Clark and Power appointed on the part of 
the Board. 

Notice of appointment of Mr. Kingsbury in 
place of Mr. Pease on committee to nominate 
members of the Cochituate Water Board. Placed 
on file. 

An order for Committee on Water to consider 
expediency of preparing a plan for supplying 
with water sucb localities as are 200 feet above 
mean low water came up referred to Commit- 
tee on "Water. Concurred. 

Petition of Charlestown Cadets. Referred. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order for the Mayor to appoint three commis- 
sioners to investigate and report: First — On the 
quality and price of gas furnished in this city as 
compared with that furnished in other localities. 
Second— Whether any improvements can be made 
in the present methods of manufacture. Third — 
Whether it would be expedient for the city to un- 
dertake the manufacture and supply of gas for 
public and private lighting; and, Fourth — Wheth- 
er any further legislation is necessary to enable 
gas consumeis or municipal authorities tr obtain 
a prompt and impartial investigation into com- 
plaints made to gas companies, etc. Said com- 
missioners to serve without compensation, except 
for necessary personal or clerical expenses. 
Passed and sent down. 

STABLES. 

Alderman Worthington submitted reports from 
the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Board as follows on petitions for leave to occu- 
py stabies: 

Recommending that leave be granted on 
usual conditions, on petitions of D. D.Pike, 305 
Medford street, Charlestown; William Washburn, 
215 Fifth street; Daniel M. O'Connell, Winship 
street, near Washington street, Ward 19; Samson 
Holland, No. 2 Wise place ;E A. Noyes, 5 and 7 
Noith Centre street; James M. Hale, 6 Boylston 
square; John 1 rainer, 150 Foundry street; Mellen 

F. Doten, Woodville square, Highlands. 
Recommei ding leave to withdraw on petitions 

of William Houseman, (at request of petitioner,) 
22 Centre street; Hei ry K. Wing, Northampton 
street ; D. Banks McKenzie, 48 Fourth street. 
Severally accepted. 

UNION STREET TO BE CLOSED. 

Alderman Power presented a petition from the 
Blackstone JStatioi.al Bank for leave to block Un- 
ion street for about six hours on Tuesday, 19th 
inst., and on his motion the following order was 
passed : 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police be authorized 
to close Union street against the passage of vehi- 
cles on Tuesday, the 19th inst., to enable the Black- 
stone National Bank to hoist a safe into their new 
building on said street. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Bigelow, for the Committee on Li- 
censes, submitted reports as follows: 

Auctioneer's License Granted— M. Frank Paige, 
125 and 127 Pearl street. 

Victuallers' Licenses Granted — Robert Goodall, 
148y 2 Hanover street ; John L. Cummins, 2cy 2 Lev- 
erett street; Jeremiah Lyons, 157 Cambridge 
street; William Henry Low, 1579 Washington 
street. 

Innholders Licensed— Bell & Johnson, Quincy 
House. 

Victuallers' Licenses Refused— George W. Nor- 
cross, 157 Elioc street; George Le Roy, 79 Albany 
street. 

Severally accepted. 

ORDERS TO PAY FOR STREET DAMAGES. 

Alderman Hairis from the Committee on 
Streets on the part of the Board, submitted an or- 
der to pay Mary C. Haskins $1024.91, for damages 
occasioned and land taken in the name of Daniel 

G. Haskins by the widening of Foster street, 
Brighton, in 1873 Read twice ana passed. 

Alderman Clark, trom the sam ■ committee, sub- 
mitted orders to pay for street aamages as fol- 
lows: 

Simpson C. Bizby, $164, for widening Shawm u 
avenue, now Washington street. 



JANUARY 18, 1875. 



14: 



Lewis Clark, $16,594.50, for widening Leverett 
street. 
Severally read once. 

EXAMINATION OF THE LATE TREASURER'S AC- 
COUNTS. 

Alderman Bigelow offered tbe following: 
Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on 
the Treasury Department be authorized to make 
a thorough examination of the late Treasurer's 
accounts, includiug all the cash, notes, bonds, 
mortgages, books and papers j and that they be 
authorized Co procure the services of such clerical 
assistants as may be necessary ; the expense to be 
charged to the appropriation foi- Incidental?. 
Read twice and passed and sent down. 

THE NAME OF "POST OFFICE SQUARE." 

On motion of Alderman Clark, the Board took 
up the special assignment for i l / 2 o'clock P. M., 
viz., hearing of all parties who favor or who op- 
pose the proposed cnange in the name of "Post 
Office square" to "Farragut square." 

Mr. E. P. Mudge said he had no individual in- 
terest in the matter, looked upon it as a citizen 
of«Bost~n and the United States, aiad desired 
to perpetuate the memory of those who 
made this country what it is. In London the 
first object is the statue of Nelson in Trafalgar 
square; and in passing from square to square 
they are remindpd of those who made Great Brit- 
ain a great nation. We should have something 
to stamp indelibly upon our minds the history of 
our country. This question alone, of teaching our 
history to the rising generation and to foreigners, 
should be sufficiont to decide the question. 

The Chair read the petition of ex-Mayors Josiah 
Quincy, J. M. Wightman, F. W. Lincoln, A. H. 
Rice and William Gaston, approving the name of 
Far agut square. 

Captain Gustavus V. Fox said — Mr. Mayor and 
gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen, I regietthat 
sickness prevents Mr. Rice from being present at 
this hearing, since it devolved upon him to speak 
in behalf of the numerous petitioners in this mat- 
ter, with which he was familiar, and he would have 
been most persuasive. 

My position as assistant secretary of the navy 
during the war gave me a central position as to 
the organization of naval operations and the se- 
lection of commanders. One ot the first procla- 
mations of Jeff Davis declareu that the Southern 
Confederacy had taken possession of and would 
hold the mouth of the Mississippi River. 

It hardly required this bold assertion to fire the 
heart of the Norchwest or indicate that that rivei 
was the keystone 'fa southern empire; and the 
first effoitsof the Navy Department, so soon a.^ 
the blockade was established, looked towards an 
attack upon New Orleans. The military author- 
ities considered a purely naval attack impossible, 
but as they were notable to furnish a sufficient 
number of troops to make it a joint expedition, 
we determined to take the risk with the navy 
alone. In Admiral Farragu f we found a com- 
mander who approved our plan ana pledged him- 
.'elf to execute it. When the supreme moment 
arrived for the passage of the forts, success 
seemed impossible; such was the opinion of some 
of the officers of our fleet, as well as of the 
French admiral who came down from New Or- 
leans and told Admiral Farragut that his force 
was largely inferior and defeat was certain. 

To an ordinary mind this would have been 
sufficient to awaken a feeling of doubt, the 
suie prelude of defeat, but to his heroic tempera- 
ment the multiplicatior of obstacles in his path 
aroused him to a more sublime effort. He select- 
ed the hour of night for the attack, which Napo- 
leon declared to be the most trying to human 
courage. 

When the tire rafts of the rebels lit up the scene 
and all their batteries were opened, the long dark 
line of Federal <hips seemed to be plunging into 
hell fire. From this deathly embrace the old ad- 
miral emerged victorious. His at f ack upon the 
defences of Mobile was second onlv to that upon 
New Orleans. Lashed to the masthead, enveloped 
in victory, he scorned the fire of forts, the attack 
of ironclads, and the more deadly torpedoes. 

He told me himself that when the leading ship 
was sunk by torpedoes, and the next, in line 
stopped, thus endangering the whole attack, he 
looked up to heaven and saw written there, as 
plain as Constaniine saw our emblem of faith, 
"Go on." 

This is the hero whose memory you can honor, 
whose stainless life is a precious heirloom to pos- 
terity, whose valor opened the two channels 



through which will flow forever the cotton which 
give3 activity and wealth to our State ana city. 
He died poor at Portsmouth, N. H., leaving be- 
hind, to be honored or neglected, the name of 
Loyal Farragut. 

At the request of Captain Fox, the Chair read 
the following : 

Boston, Jan. 18, 1875. 

My Dear Sir— 1 see by the newspapers that the 
petitioners for naming the open space opposite 
the new Post Office and Treasury Building Farra- 
gut square are to be heard this afternoon by the 
Board of Aldermen. I fear that I shall not be 
permitted to be there; but I hope you may go, 
and if ne^d be say a few words for Farragut 
square. No description of public honors is more 
lasting or more beneficial to a community than 
such as perpetually brings to mind the names, 
the example and services of brave and virtuous 
men and women. The old aie gratified by the 
commemoration of the deeds of their contempt ra- 
ries, and the young are stimulated to noble aspi- 
rations by the inspiring rewards of popular re- 
nown. 

Farragut was a national character, one of the 
world's great heroes, who would have received en- 
during honors in any country, and his name re- 
flects its lustre upon the natiou whichheso brave- 
ly served. We have in Boston no memorial of 
him, or of the brilliant and wonderfully successful 
achievements of the navy, to whose officers and 
men, during the late warj Massachusetts and New 
England made such large contribution. The name 
of Farragut, the Admiral of the navy, attached to 
the space opposite the chief national building in 
Boston, and at the junction cf Congress and Fed- 
eral streets, would be a ju<c and graceful honor to 
the gieat admiral and to the naval service repre- 
sented by him. No interest can possibly be in- 
jured thereby. The locality has not become 
known by any other name, and therefore there can 
be no confusion of place, or disturbance of com- 
mercial value, and I teel sure that a great majori- 
ty of our fellow-citizens woul I be gratified m 
having Admiral Farragut's name permanently ap- 
plied to so prominent a square in the metropolis 
of New England. 

Yours very truly, 

Alex. H. Rice. 

Hon. George C. Richardson. 

Mr. Charles Levi Woodbury came to bear his 
tribute in behalf of the matter. He could hardly 
add anything to those who had preceded him, and 
he could not see how any one could doubt the 
propriety ot granting this petition. He alluded 
to Boston's experience in the war, the fact that 
she furnished many sailors to the war, and the re- 
lief received fioua the officers of the navy yard 
during the great fire. Now, the representatives 
of the uavy ask the Board to bestow this mark of 
honor upon their commander. To the argument 
that Post Office square is more appropriate to a 
commercial city, he replied that Boston is a great 
commercial city aDd her commerce is as great an 
advantage as her manufactories; the name of 
Farragut is known to every sailor and it would be 
favorable to all whoJiad ever been sailors. The 
Post Office has made five removals in twelve years, 
and it may move as many times in the next twelve 
years. This is a great national building, includiug 
the Post Office and Sub-Treasury, and Treasury 
square would be equally appropriate with Post 
Office square, in fact a better one for the com- 
mercial interests. He understood that the Post- 
master General heartily approved the name of 
Farragut square, and he thought no objection of 
a solid character could be raised against it. 

Mr. Howard French alluded to the previous ac- 
tion of the Board on the i ubject, the settlement of 
business men there, and said he had taken pains 
to learn that every tenant there and a great 
majority of real-estate owners there favored re- 
taining the name. He understood Colonel Fox to 
be a leader of the movement, and to have ob- 
tained the signatures of many firms in Summer 
street, but that did not represent the business 
men interested. If we wish to honor the memory 
ot the great man, why not give the name to one 
of the public parks to be taken, and do it in good 
shape. He protested that a change of name 
would inconvenience the business located there. 
He exhibited a sketch of the locality and the 
estates thereon, and presented a protest from tDe 
abutters on the easterly side of the square, ft om 
others who are present and prospective oc- 
cupants of buildings on the square, and sev- 
eral others. Beyond this the remonstrants did 
not propose to go; he knew of no precedent to 



15 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



justify the change of the name in the face of pro- 
tests like those. It was purely a business matter, 
ana not to be settled by sentiment or rhetoric. 

The remonstrances presented by Mr. French are 
headed by H. H. Hunuewell & Sons et al., Shaw- 
mut and Webster National banks, George W. 
Kuhu et al., B. Cailender & Co., et al., and the 
real estate owners facing on Post Office square. 

Mr. Francis Jaques thought too mucii ad vantage 
had been taken of the feeling all have for the 
great and good; but the same argument would 
apply to men of our own State and city, as well as 
of the nation. There is only a small stieet in Bos- 
ton named af tei Joiin A. Andrew, and none after 
Lincoln or Sumner. If such a poli'y were adopt- 
ed it could be carried out indefinitely. The real 
point i.->, shall a square which has an appropriate 
name now, receive another which means nothing 
in a mercantile view? The present name desig- 
nates a locality aud tells what is to be found 
there. Lindall street was changed to Exchange 
place because it was appropriate, and he begged 
the Board to think of appropriateness and fitness 
in this connection. 

Mr. Lafayette A. Lyon said merchants there had 
had their stationery printed at the beginning of the 
year, and it would be quite a pecuniary loss to 
nave the name changed. Then, too, the name 
Post Office square has a business sound, and 
would be more advantageous to those doiug busi- 
ness there in their efforts to extend their commer- 
cial relations. If the city is to commemorate the 
services of Farragut, let it be done by naming one 
of the great public parks in his honor. 

On motion of Allerman Clark, the petitions and 
remonstrances were referred to the Committee on 
Paving. 

THE PARK QUESTION. 

The Board took up the special assignment for 5 
P. M., viz., order for the ivtayor to petition the 
General Court for authority "to purchase or oth- 
erwise take- lands within the limits of the city" 
for purpose of public parks. 

The question was on the passage of the order. 

Alderman Power — This is a matter of very great 
importance, and I hope the order will not pass to- 
day, at least, and with my present convictions I 
propose to endeavor to have it indefinitely post- 
poned, although I do not intend to make such a 
motion today. I hope it will be laid upon the ta- 
ble for the present. It may seem to most gentle- 
men that there is no harm in simply petitioning 
the Legislature to give the city power to take 
land for a public park, for after we get that au- 
thority we need not take advantage of it 
unless we see fit. But my experience in 
this Government shows that there is 
more harm in it than would appear— that is, if 
this order is passed, it will carry a certain amount 
of prestige and conviction to the members of the 
Legislatuie ; and to those wto may come after us 
here, it will appear that the Government which 
preceded them was in favor of this measure. But 
as many gentlemen here may not have had time — 
I think all cannot have-had— to look into this mat- 
ter, and cannot have the knowledge they should 
have before voting on it, I move that it be laid on 
the table for the present. 

■ Alderman Clark— For the purpose of allowing 
members of this Board time to re-read the report 
of the commission who have investigated this 
subject with so much thoroughness and reported 
on it with so much clearness— I have no doubt the 
members have read it already, as I believe every 
intelligent citizen should have done by this time — 
I shall raise no objections to laying the order on 
the table at the present time. 

Alderman Worthington— I would move that it 
be specially assigned for one week from today. If 
the petition is going to the Legislature it is impor- 



tant that it should be got in early. There is a rule 
of the Legislature that all petitions must be put 
in four or five weeks before that body meets ; that 
time has passed, and we shill have to ask them to 
suspend that rule in order to receive it. It is im- 
portant to put this petition in early, that the Leg- 
islature may commence their work as soon as pos- 
sible and get through with it. I hope the matter 
will be settled in this Board next Monday and sent 
to the other branch. 

Alderman Power — I shall object to the special 
assignment. If members of this Board think 
they have had sufficient time by next Monday, 
they can take it up then. I know of nothing more 
important than this to come before the Board this 
year — nothing that will involve the city in as 
great a debt as this will, except the establishment 
of water works. Therefore, I think members 
should weigh this matter with great care before 
acting upon it. 

The Chair ruled that the motion to specially as- 
sign could not he entertained while the motion to 
lay on the table was pending. 

Alderman Prescott — I trust the motion to lay on 
the table will not prevail. I hope we shall not 
commence the year by laying matters on the table 
and accumulating a whole page of orders, as we 
have done ; but that this matter shall be specially 
assigned to next Monday at 5 P. M., and at that 
time taken up and discussed; and if any more 
light is needed then it can be specially assigned 
for the following Monday. 

Alderman Burrage— I should prefer to have it 
laid upon the table rather than specially assigned. 
I think this is a mattec upon which we should 
make haste slowly. For myself, I prefer to act on 
the water question before voting upoD this order. 
I think we should have an ample supply of water, 
whether we have parks or not. 

The Chair reminded the Board that debate was 
not strictly in order, although it had been allowed 
to progress thus far. 

The order was laid on the table— 8 for, 4 against 
— by a rising vote. 

REMOVAL OF ICE FROM SIDEWALKS. 

Alderman Quincy offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Committee on Ordinances be 
instructed to consider and report whether any 
change is expedient in the ordinance now in force 
in relation to the removal of ice from the side- 
walks in order to facilitate the enforcement 
theieof. 
Read twice and passed and sent down. 

JOINT RULES AND ORDERS. 

Alderman Power submitted a report [City Doc. 
No. 14] from the Joint Special Committee on 
Joint Rules and Orders of the City Council, which, 
on his motion, was laid over. 

The changes from the rules of last year are 
mostly verbal: and the sections are rearranged. 
One change authorizes committees to say to which 
branch a report shall be made, instead of requir- 
ing such reports in all cases to be sent to the 
branch where the subject originated. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC 
LANDS. 

The annual report of the Superintendent of 
Public Lands [City Doc. No. 10] was received and 
sent down. 

During the year 34,713 square feet of public 
lands have been sold for $40,003.75, of which 
$19,811.75 have been paid into the treasury, and 
the remnainder has been taken in bonds. For ex- 
tensions of times, rents, etc., there have been 
received $3911. The expenditures have been 
$7222.01. 

On motion of Alderman Power, the Board ad- 
journed. 



16 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



GITV OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JANUARY 31, 1875. 



Regular weekly meeting at 7V 2 P. M., Halsey J. 
Boardman, President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN FOR CON- 
CURRENCE. 

Annual reports of the Superintendent of Public 
Lands, Board of Street Commissioners, and Su- 
perintendent of Maiden Bridge. Severally placed 
on file. 

Petition of Thomas A.Kelley andC. J. Douovan, 
and reouest of School Committee to be supplied 
with Municipal Registers. Severally referred. 

Order authorizing the making of rules and regu- 
lations concerning sales by minors as provided by 
law. Passed. 

Order for the Committee on Ordinances to con- 
sider and report whether any change is expedient 
in the ordinance in relation to tbe' removal of 
snow and ice from sidewalks. Passed. 

Order authorizing the Committee on the Treas- 
ury to make a thorough examination of the late 
Treasurer's accounts, including cash, notes, bonds, 
etc., and to procure the services of necessary as- 
sistants. Ordered to a second reading and laid 
over, and subsequently read a second time and 
passed, under a suspension of the lule, on motion 
of Mr. Peabody of Ward 9, who said the commit- 
tee are now actively engaged in examining tbe 
late City Treasurer's accounts, and are in hopes 
of being able to report at the next meeting. 

Order for the Mayor to appoint three commis- 
sioners to investigate and report: 1. On the qual- 
ity and price of gas furnished in this city as com- 
pared with that furnished in other localities. 2. 
Whether any improvements can be made in the 
methods of' manufacture. 3. Whether it would 
be expedient for the city to undertake the manu- 
facture and supply of gas for public lighting; 
and, 4. Whether any further legislation is neces- 
sary to enable gas consumers to obtain a prompt 
and impartial investigation into complaints made 
to gas companies, etc. — said commissioners to 
serve without compensation, except for necessary 
personal or clerical expenses. Oidered to a sec- 
ond reading. ' 

ELECTIONS. 

The report' making nominations for city officers 
submitted at the last meeting were taken up, and 
elections were proceeded with, as follows: 

Directors of East Boston Ferries. Messrs. Kim- 
ball of Ward 6, Edwards of Ward 15, and Collins of 
Ward 2 were appointed a committee to receive, 
sort aod count votes. They reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 55 

Necessary to a choice 28 

Alderman Solomon B, Stebbins had 54 

Councilman Ruf us S. Cushman 55 

Councilman Nathan S. Wilbur 55 

And they were declared elected on the pait of tbe 
Common Council. Sent up. 

Trustees of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Messrs. Long of 
Ward 8, ISfoyes of Ward 5, and Wbitmore of Ward 
4 were appointed a committee to receive, sort and 
count votes. They reported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 62 

Necessary to a choice 32 

Alderman Abraham O. Bigelow 62 

Councilman Augustus Parker - « . .62 

Councilman John Sweetser 62 

And they were declared on tbe part ot the Com- 
mon Council. Sent up. 

Members of the Cochituate Water Board. 
Mr. Woods of Ward 8, for the joint special 
committee to nominate canditates for mem- 
bers of the Cochituate Water Board, sub- 
mitted a report recommending the election of 
Charles J. Prescott on the part of the Board of 
Aldermen, and William G. Thacher and Uriel H. 
Crocker on the part of the Common Council. The 
report was accepted and subsequently an election 
was ordered, under a suspension of the rule— 41 
for, 10 against — on motion of Mr. Sweetser of 
Ward 10, who said he did not think it best to sus- 
pend the rule generally, yet in this case it was de- 
sirable to have the board full as early as possible, 
as they are verv busy now. Messrs. Sweetser of 
Ward 10, Hiscoek of' Ward 14, and Felt of Ward 11 
were appointed a committee to collect and count 
votes. They reported as follows: 



Whole number o± votes 63 

Necessary to a choice 32 

Alderman Charles J. Prescott had 58 

Councilman William G. Thacher 48 

Uriel H. Crocker 33 

" Amos L. Noyes 42 

" James J. Flynn 1 

And Messrs. Prescott, Thacher and Noyes were 
declared elected on the part of the Council. Sent 
up. 

Committee on Accounts. Mr. Sibley of Ward 
20, for the joint special committee to nominate 
members of the Committee on Accounts of the 
Common Council, submitted a report recommend- 
ing the election of David P. Kimball of Ward 6 to 
fill the vacancy caused by the unseating of Fred- 
erick Peas<>. the report was accepted and the 
nomination laid over. Subsequently the rule was 
suspended, on motion of Mr. Siblev of Ward 20, 
and an election ordered. Messrs. Sibley of Ward 
20, Perkins of Ward 16, and Harrigan of Ward 1 
were appointed a committee to collect and count 
votes. They reported that sixty two votes had 
been cant, all of which w^re for David P. Kim- 
ball, and he was declared elected. Certificate of 
election sent up. 

THE CONTINGENT FUND. 

A communication was received from the Au- 
ditor of Accounts stating that the Contingent Fund 
of the Common Council is exhausted. Refer ed 
to Committee on Fii ance and sent up. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

By Mr. Thacher of Ward 15— Petition of John 
Norton, for compensation for personal injuries to 
his wife from a defect in Highland street. 

By Mr. Walbridge of Ward 12— Petition of Moses 
Yickery, for compensa ion for injuries received by 
coming violently in contact with a lamp nost al- 
leged to have been carelessly left near the side 
walk on Ea. t Seventh street. 

Severally referred to the Joint Committee on 
Claims and sent up. 

REPORTS^ OF NOMINATING COMMITTEES. 

Reports were submitted from joint special com- 
mittees to nominate city officers a, follows: 

Directors for Public Institutions. By Mr. Long 
of Ward 8, recommending the election of James 
Power on the part of the Board of Aldermen, and 
Cyrus A. Page and William C. Burgess on the part 
of the Common Council. Laid over. 

Trustees of Public Library. By Mr. Sprague of 
Ward 4, recommending the election of John T. 
Clark on the part of the Board of Aldermen, and 
Charles A. Burditt ai d David P. Kimball on the 
part of the Common Council. 

Mr. Sprague of Ward 4 — In presenting the name 
of Mr. Burditt of Ward 16, who is also a member 
of the nominating committee, I think it is proper 
to say that it was with extreme reluctance that he 
allowed his name to be used again for that posi- 
tion, and he consented only after urgent solicita- 
tion on the part of the other members of the com- 
mittee. In view of his past experience on that 
board the committee thought it necessary 'that his 
services should be retained. 

The nominations were laid over. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEES APPOINTED. 

Orders for the appointment of joint special 
committees to nominate officers were offered, 
passed, and the committees appointed as follows 
(the first member of each committee offering 
the order) : 

Overseers of the Poor. Messrs. Long of Ward 
8, Devereaux of Ward 22, Beal of Ward 16. 

City Registrar. Messrs. Kingsbury of Ward 15, 
Murray of Ward 3, Goldthwait of Ward 11. 

Severally sent up. 

REMOVAL OF ICE FROM THE HARBOR. 

Mr. Anderson of Ward 3 offered the following: 
Ordered, That the 'Committee on Boston Har- 
bor be authorized to take such measuies as may 
be necessary to keep tbe harbor open and free 
from ice ; the expense to be charged to the appro- 
priation for Boston Harbor. 

Mr. Andeisci said it was very important that 
the order should pass at once, and on bis motion 
the rule was suspended and the order was read a 
second time, passed and sent up. 

BADGES. 

Mr. Anderson of Ward 3 offered the following: 
Ordered, That a committee be appointed to pro- 
cure suitable badges for members of the Common 
Council; the expense to be charged to the Con- 
tine ent Fund of the Common Council. 
Ordered to a second reading. 



JANUARY 31, 1875. 



17 



Mr. Anderson also offered the following: 
Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to anpoint the members of the Common Coun- 
cil special police officers without pay. 
Read twice and passed. 

THE TRANSCRIPT OF THE JOURNAL. 

On motion of Mr. Kingsbury of Ward 15, the 
order for tbe Clerk of tbe Common Council to pre- 
pare and print a transcript of the journal of the 
Council, was taken from the table and referred to 
the Joint Committee on Printing, and sent up. 

RULES AND ORDERS. 

On motion of Mr. Sibley of Ward 20, tbe report 
and order fixing the rules and orders of the Com- 
mon Council for the year 1875 (City Doc. No. 11) 
were taken from the table. 

Mr. Sprague of Ward 4—1 believe it will be seen 
that but few substantial changes have been made 
by the committee from the rules and orders of last 
year; but it has been.tbe design of the committee 
to change the arrangement of them to a consider- 
able extent, in order that the various rules may 
be brought under their appropriate beads, and in 
certain cases to simplify tbe statement of rules, to 
tbe end that, by proper arrangement and sim- 
plicity of statement, members may be able to 
find particular rules with as little trouble as pos- 
sible. For this purpose there is also to be added 
an index. The number of rules appears 
to be considerably greater than last year, 
which is owing to the fact that seve- 
ral of the old ones have been divided. Rule 
No. 10 is a new one, that tbe clerk "shall note all 
questions of order raised, with the decisions made 
thereon, in an appendix to the lecord." It was 
thought that such decisions, being in a measure 
new rules, should be made so a part of the 
record as to be easily accessible. Rule No. 
16 is a new one, providing that "no mem- 
ber, having obtained the floor, shall speak more 
than fifteen minutes without peimission of the 
Council. 1 ' That has oeen adopted by the commit- 
tee on the recommendation of many members of the 
Council, who thought it would facilitate business. 
If it is desirable to have a speaker contit ue longer, 
permission can be given. A slight charge is made 
in rule 55, which provides that "After a motion is 
stated by the Pre ident it shall be deemed to be in 
the possession of tbe Council, and shall be disposed 
of by vote ; but the mover may, if no objection is 
maiie, withdiaw it at any time before a decision or 
amendment." The words "if no objection is made" 
have been added; it seemed to the committee that 
after a motion has once been made, it should be in 
the possession of the House, and the mover should" 
not have the right to withdraw it if any member 
objected. In rule No. 59, in the report as 
presented by the committee, a slight verbal change 
from the printed document was made so that 
it should read, "no appeal from the deci- 
sion of the Preident shall be entertained un- 
less it is seconded" ; the phrase "shall be enter- 
tained ' being sub-tituiedfor "shall be made." Tbe 
latter part of rule C4 is new, the committee hav- 
ing added, "and no question sbajl be twice recon- 
sidered, nor shall any reconsideration be had 
upon either of the following motions: To ad- 
journ, to lay on the table, to take from 
.the table, or for the previous question." 
There did not seem to be any reason why 
a reconsideration should be moved now on those 
morions, and I believe it is in accordance with 
parliamentary usage to adopt this rule. A 
slight change is made in rule 67, as submitted 
by the committee, by striking out of th? last line 
the words "of both branches," so that it would 
read, "or the joint rules and orders of tbe City 
Council." Tbe committee deemed it very desirable 
that these i ule-> should be printed and laid before 
the Council at the last meeting, but in order to do 
so, were compelled to forego even therefore a 
careful revision of the proof. There are two or 
three amendments which I would like to move, 
they having the approval of the other members of 
the' committee. Ie rule 23, in the thiid line, after 
the word President, insert the words "or by the 
Council," *o that it shall read, "when any member 
shall be guilty of a breach of either of the rules 
and orders of the Council, he may be required by 
the President or by the Council to make satisfac- 
tion therefor" ; also in the fourth line strike out 
the word "or" and insert "nor to," and after "ex- 
cept" insert "once," so that it will read "and in 
such a case he shall not be allowed to vote nor to 
speak except once by way of excuse, till he has 
done so [made satisfaction], unless otherwise or- 
dered by the Council." 1 believe it is usually in 



accordance with general pailiamentary usage and 
and I know it is the rule in the House of 
Representatives, that a member may be re- 
quired by the House to make satisfaction. 
It seemed proper . to the committee that we 
should insert "by the Council," so that he may be 
required to do so either by the President or by the 
Council. The 39th rule I also move to amend by 
adding in the 3d section, after the words "unfin- 
ished business of preceding meetings," the words, 
"and motions for reconsideration," so that when 
notice has been entered with the Clerk of an in- 
tention to move a reconsideration, that motion 
may be made early in the meeting ard may not be 
lost by other business coming up, as is likely to be 
the case if required to be made under tbe head of 
motions, orders and resolutions, as now. As it 
seems to be necessary th it the motion should be 
made at the next meeting of the Council 
after such intention is given, an opportu- 
nity to make it should be given early in 
the evening. The other amendments which I pro- 
pose are si'm, ly verbal. First, in the 56th section, 
last line, to strike out "shall be" ard insert "has 
been"; in rule 59, third line, strike out "shall 
have" and insert "h«s"; in mle 60, first line, Strike 
out "shall be" and insert "is." These verbal 
changes are simply to make the style conform to 
that of the rest of the rules. 

The amendments offered by Mr. Sprague were 
severally adopted.' 

Mr. Wilson of Ward 12 — There have been so 
many amendments proposed, that I would like to 
see them all together befoie the rules are adopt- 
ed, and I move that this report, as amended, be 
laid upon the table and printed, with the amend- 
ments in . italics. I will withdiaw the motion, 
however, if any gentleman desires to speak. 

Mr. Fitzgerald of Ward 7 — At the sugges 
tion of some of the members, and after con- 
sultation with some members of the Com- 
mittee on Rules and Orders, I beg leave 
to offer the following amendment to the 
sixty-third rule: "Debates on moiionsto reconsid- 
er shall be limited to thirty minutes, and no mem- 
ber shall speak more than five minutes." The 
members of the committee and of this board well 
know that when a question is thoroughly debated 
and decided, very often it happens that some 
member feels hurt* and gets a little mad with him- 
self and the board and wants to make a long- 
speech. So be gets somebody to move a reconsid- 
eration of the question, and when the motion is 
made be gets his long speech off , and that is all 
he cares about. He knows that is all he can do; 
he gets off his long speech and sits dow r n qui- 
etly, knowing beforehand that an overwhelm- 
ing majority is opposed to him. But he 
wants to make a long speech, and lie succeeds. It 
is a rule in the House of Representatives that 
after a question has been settled there shall be no 
more debate on trie main question, unless the 
House votes to reconsider; after a reconsideration 
takes place then the main question can come up 
and the debate go on. A man can say in five min- 
utes ail that is necessary on a question of recon- 
sideration, after a subject has been thoioughly 
discussed, and I say that nothing should be said 
on the main question until after a recon- 
sideration has taken place. That has been 
the rule in the House of Representatives for 
years: I think it has been a good one there, and 
that members of this Council who have been here 
in former years will see that such a rule will do 
good here. I believe the members of the Commit- 
tee on Rules ap orove of it. 

The amendment of Mr. Fitzgerald was adopted. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 15 moved to amend rule 17 
by inserting the woid "so" before the word "de- 
sire," and to strike out tbe words "to speak" in 
the last line. Adopted. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 15—1 move to amend rule 31 
(viz.: "No meeting of any committee shall be 
called upon less notice than twenty-tour hours") 
by adding, "unless a' pressing necessity requires 
it." The reason I proposed that amendment was 
that the rule seemed to be imperative that a com- 
mittee should not be called unless with twenty- 
four hours notice. Circumstances may occur — 
such as the stoppage of water, an explosion, or 
something of the kind— by which a committee 
should be called here immediately. I think a 
committee was called togtther last week in such a 
case, as it was necessary to have them go off next 
morning. In such cases it would be better to 
break the rule than wait. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6—1 hope that amendment 
will not be. adopted. If a pressing necessitv or an 



18 



COMMON COUNCIL 



emergency arises, and the committee is called to- 

f ether in iess than tweDty-four hours, the mem- 
ers waive their objections. If we adopt this 
amendment, the question will be constantly aris- 
ing, What is a pressing necessity ? and who shall 
determine it? Now, each gentleman upon a com- 
mittee knows very well that be shall receive, in a 
majority of cases, bis notice of a meeting in twen- 
ty-four hours, and those of us who do not go 
home during the day would get it when 
we reach home at night, while all would 
be pretty sure to get it by the next day. 
Gentlemen will remember that early in last year 
one of the Nominating committees was called in 
less than twenty-four hours in such a way that 
one member failed to receive his notice, and it 
was brought to the attention of the Council. It 
will work" much better in a majority of cases if 
we let this rule stand as it is, so that we may all 
have time enough to receive the notice in season 



to make arrangements to attend the meetings of 
the various committees. I think that if the gen- 
tleman from Ward 15 had served here during the 
past year, he would see that the rule has worked 
very well as it is, and I think.he would agree with 
me that 10 change is desirable. 

Mr. Clarke withdrew the amendment. 

Mr. Sprague of Ward 4—1 should also have 
stated that rule 67 is new, as I presume the 
fact was recognized by the members. It pro- 
vides that the "rules of parliamentary practice 
comprised in 'Cushing's Manual' shall govern the 
Council in all cases to which they are applicable," 
etc. That, I believe, has been ^understood to be 
the case, but it is introduced as one of the rules of 
the Council. 

The rules and orders as amended were adopted. 

On motion of Mr. Train of Ward 13 the Council 
adjourned. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



19 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

JANUARY 25, 1875. 

Regular weekly meeting; at four o'clock P. M. 
Alderman Clark, Chairman, presiding. 

JTJBOBS DRAWN. 

Seven grand jurors were drawn for the February 
term of the Superior Criminal Court. 

EXECUTIVE NOMINATIONS CONFIRMED. 

Special Police Officers— James A. Crowe, Rug- 
gles-street Baptist Church ; James Breiman , Oak- 
land Hall, Mattapan : Jacob Abhott, Charles street 
and its vicinity; and the members of the Common 
Council. 

PETITIONS, ETC., REFERRED. 

To the Committee on Police. Robert T. Swan 
et al., that certain streets in Ward 16 be used for 
"coasting," subject to police supe/vinon. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Board. M. C. Murry, for leave to occupy a new 
wooden stable for five horses on Downer street, 
Ward 15. 

To the Conwnittee on County Accounts. Regis- 
ter of Probate, to be reimbursed for $139 paid to 
persons working in that office. 

To the Committee on Sewers. Patrick O'Beirne, 
notice of appeal from assessment for sewer in 
Circuit street. 

John J. Williams, notice of appeal from assess- 
ment for sewer in Circuit street. 

James A. Kemp, to be relieved from the over- 
flow of the Kemp-street sewer. 

To the Joint Special Committee to Nom inate a 
Superintendent of Common and Public Grounds. 
Herman Grundel, for appointment as Superiten- 
dent of Common, etc. 

To the Committee on Paving. Andrew C. 
Wheelwright, to be paid for grade damages at 14 
and 16 Central street. 

John Borland, to be paid for grade damages on 
Kilby street. 

Sarah P. Lang, to be paid for damages to estate 
265 E street, caused by surface water. 

To the Joint Committee on Armories. Company 
E, Ninth Inff.ntry, for approval of armory at 
corner of Harvard and Washington street". 

Company D, Fourth Battaliou Infantry, for ap- 
proval of armory at corner of Webster and Orleans 
streets. 

To the Joint Committee on Claims. Sarah 
Waters, to be compensated for personal injuries 
caused by alleged defect in Ninth street. 

Frederick Monroe, to be paid for copying old 
Charlestov n (town) records. 

Charles R. Classen, to be compensated for in- 
juries sustained by his wife from a fall in Ex- 
change street. , 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Report and order establishing joint rules and 
orders of the City Council for 1875. (City Doc. 
No. 14.) Passed aud sent.dowu. 

Orders to pay Lewis Clark $16,594.50, for Levei- 
ett street damages, and to pay Simpson C. Bixbv 
$164. for Shawmut avenue damages. Seveially 
passed. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL FOR CONCUR- 
RENCE. 

Betitions of John Norton and Moses Vickery, 
and order for printing of transcript of Common 
Council journal. Severally referred. 

Certificate of election of David P. Kimball as a 
member of Committee on Accounts. Placed on file. 

Order for appointment of a special committee 
(Messrs. Long, Devereux and Beal to be joined) 
to nominate Overseers of the Poor. Passed, and 
Aldermen Quincy and Stebbins appointed. 

Order for the Committee on the Harbor to keep 
the ship channel free from ice. Passed. 

Order for appointment of a special committee 
(Messrs. Kingsbury, Murray and Goldthwait to be 
joined) to nominate a City Registrar. Passed, and 
Aldermen Pope and Worthington appointed. 

A communication from the Auditor of Accouuts 
stating that the Contingent Fund of the Common 
Council is exhausted, came up referred to the 
Committee on Finance. Concurred. 

Report in favor of election of Alderman Steb- 
bins and Couucilmen Cushman and Wilbur as 
Directors of East Boston Ferries, and certificate 
of election of saiu gentlemen as such Directors by 
the Common Council. The report was accepted 
and the Board proceeded to an election. Alder- 
men Bigelow and Burrage were appointed a com- 
mittee to collect and count votes. They reported 
as follows: 



Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Alderman Solomon B. Stebbins 11 

" Clinton Viles 1 

Councilman Rufus Cushman 12 

N. S. Wilbur 12 

And Messrs. Stebbins, Cushman and Wilbur were 
declared elected in concurrence. 

Report in favor of election of Alderman Bige- 
low and Councilmen Parker and Sweetser as 
Trustees of Mt. Hope Cemetery, and certificate of 
election of above-named Trustees by the Common 
Council. The report was accepted and an election 
was ordered. Aldermen "Viles and O'Brien were 
appointed a committee to collect and count votes. 
They reported that Alderman Bigelow and Coun- 
cilmen Parker and Sweetser had each received 
eleven votes, the whole number cast. They were 
declared elected in concurrence. 

Report in favor of the election of Alderman 
Power and Councilmen Page and Burgess as Di- \ 
rectors for Public Institutions. Accepted. 

Report in favor of the election of Aldennan 
Claik and Councilmen Burditt and Kimball as 
Trustees of the Public Library. Accepted. 

Report in favor of the election of Alderman 
Prescott and Councilmen Thacher and docker as 
members of the Coohituate Water Board; and 
election of Messrs. Prescott, Thacher and Noyes 
as members of said Board. The report was accept- 
ed, and the Board proceeded to an election. 

Aldermen Pope and Worthington were ap- 
pointed a com mittee to collect and count votes, 
They reported as follow : 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Alderman Charles J. Prescott 11 

Councilman William G. Thacher 9 

■ " Amos L. Noyes 5 

Uriel H. Crocker 10 

And Messrs. Prescott and Thacher were de- 
clared elected in concurrence, and Mr. Crocker 
was declared elected in non-concurrence. Certifi- 
cate sent down. 

RESIGNATION. 

A communication was received fiorn William H. 
Cbipman resigning the office of Inspector of Elec- 
tion in Ward 11. Placed on file. 

JAIL EXPENSES. 

A requisition was received from the Sheriff of 
Suffolk County for $1816.96, heing the expenses of 
the jail for January. Ordered paid. 

ORDER OF NOTICE ON PETITION. 

A petition was received from Charles H. Bacon 
for leave to locate and use a steam engine and 
boiler of fony-koise power in rear of 486 Harrison 
avenue, and an order of notice was passed for a 
hearing to all parties objecting thereto on Mon- 
day, Feb. 15, at four o'clock P. M. 

THE ANNUAL RtPORT OF CITY SURVEYOR 

(City Doc. No. 12) was received and sent down. 
The amount expended during' the year has been — 
Expenses of City Surveyor's office at City Hall, $24,148.64 

Expenses of the Roxbury branch office 6.984.53 

Expenses of the Dorchester branch office 9,282.06 

Expenses of the West Roxbury branch office. . 7,061.50 

Expenses of the Charlestown branch office 2,849.49 

Expenses of the Brighton branch office 2,766.99 

Total expenditure from appropriation for sur- 
veying 153,093.21 

Amount charged to the appropriation for 

"Northampton-street District" 1,854.45 

Total expenditures for 1874 $54,947.66 

Among the more important plans prepared dur- 
ing the year were a "betterment plan" of the 
burnt district; plans of Atlantic avenue docks, 
Northampton-street District, S wett-street District, 
and Dedham-street District. Theie are now 10,088 
plans in the department, besides 3138 lithographed 
plans. 

THE ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 
OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

(City Doc. No. 13) was received and sent down. 

The gross expenditures for the year have been — 
Public buildings (116 in number), repairs, altera- 
tions, etc., $128,835.26; county buildings (includ- 
ing the establishment of the new court rooms), 
$41,197.46; schoolhouse, 150 in number, contain- 
ing 1211 school rooms, $356,625.12; extraordinary 
expenses, including thirty new buildings, $1,448,- 
726.00. The number of new buildings under con- 
struction during the past year far exceeds that 
for any pievious year in the histoiy of the depart- 
ment. It is believed, however, that the require- 
ments for new buildings for the present are in a 
great measure supplied, so much so that the ap- 
propriation for such can be reduced $700,000 dur- 
ing the coming year. 



20 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



The following is a comparative statement of the 
number of county buildings, public buildings and 
schoolhouses, together with the number of feet of 
land covered by tbe same between the year* 1864 
and 1875 : 

IS IS 5 'g 

a ap,? a teg,? gS 

S.^ S.oo £!z! S.oo EfS 

p.? p.<! H a- S<h, 5© 

Bo b3» Bo B2» P 

crh. nit" mi hi mSS ><H" 

a> to p." „ m p_cr ^p 

="8- c2, «h> 

1864. I8H4. 1875. 1875. 

County Buildings. 3 153.297 3 153,498 201 

Public Buildings.. 32 269.337 116 1,779,777 1,510,440 

Sehoolhouses 74 677,000 150 2,3,! 1,683 1.644,683 

Totals 109 1,099,634 269 4,254,958 3,155,324 

The above will rhow a total increase in eleven 
years rf 160 buildings, and of land equivalent to 
about seventy-two acres. 

The estimated valuation of the several county, 
public buildings and schoolbouses, including fur- 
niture, land, etc., is as follows : 

Count j $2,000,000 

Public buildings 6,434,364 

Scboolhouses.. 7,996,500 

Total.... $16,430,864 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Bjgelow ; for the Committee on Li- 
censes, submitted reports as follows: 

Auctioneers' Licenses Granted— John Watsen, 
775 Washington street; F. H. Nazro, 116 Pearl 
street; W. G. Burnbam & Co., 25 Congress street. 

Amusement Licenses Granted — Yotng Men's 
Catholic Association, to give dramatic entertain- 
ment at Wait's Hall, March 15; J. Pigeon, to give 
Punch and Judy exhibitions at 600 Washington 
street. 

Dealer in Second-band Articles Licensed— John 
Levis, con.er Decatur and Paris streets. 

Victuallers' Licenses Granted — Elizabeth Chee- 
vers, 957 Tremont street; John B. Perry & Co., 
771 Washington, street. 

Victuallers' License Refused— P. H. Marzynski, 
104 Eliot street. 

Hack Licenses Granted— E. L. Carey, 198 Port- 
land street; John T. Murray, 705 Tremont street. 

Pawnbroker's License Granted— Abraham Levi, 
23 Cross street. 

Billiard Licenses Granted— J. George Cooper, 
Providence Depot; Arthur FTynn, 1350 Tremont 
street. 

Dealers in Second-hand Articles Licensed — Mi- 
chael Curiy, 562 East Second street; Thomas 
Hughes, 1032 Harrison avenue; Michael Conboy, 
Keyes street, Ward 17. » 

Severally accepted. 

MINORS' LICENSES. 

Alderman Bigelow, for the Committee on Li- 
censes, offered an order establishing the rules of 
the Board for the legulation of minors' licenses. 
[The only material change from those of last year 
are in sections 9 and 10, by which bootblacks are 
put under the supervision of tbe truant officers in 
the districts where their stands are located.] The 
order was read twice and passed. 

FRANKLIN FUND. 

Alderman Bigelow offered the following: 
Ordered, Tbat the Committee on the Treasury 
Department on the part of this Board examine the 
accounts of the late Treasurer of the Fiai_klin 
Fund. 
Read twice and passed. 

PAVING DEPARTMENT. 

Aldeiman Power, for the Committee on Paving, 
submitted the following : 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Stieets be 
authorized, under the diiection of the Committee 
on Paving, to contract fiom time to time for the 
purchase and exchange of horses, the supply of 
hay, grain , paving stones, gravel and other ma- 
terials required for the operations of the Paving 
D epartment during the present municipal year. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized, under the direction of the Committee 
on Paving, to furnish and set edgeston^s and pave 
sidewalks on any portions of public streets where 
the abutters agree in writing to pay one-half the 
cost thereof. 

Ordered, That tbe Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized, under the direction of the Committee 
on Paving, to erect fences in front of vacant lots 
on public streets where the public safety requires 
the same. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent be authorized 
to grant permits to open the streets in accordance 



with the ninth and tenth sections of the ordinance 
relating thereto. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized, under the direction of the Committee 
on Paving, to number or renumber any street, 
court or place within the city limits, whenever in 
the opinion of said committee the public conven- 
ience will be promoted thereby. 

Ordered, That tbe Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to lay cross-walks and pave gutters en 
the public streets of the city when deemed expe- 
dient by the Committee on Paving. 

Severally read once. 

Report recommending leave to withdraw on pe- 
tition of E. W. James et al., that the thirty-third 
location of the Metropolitan Railroad in Charles 
street be revoked. 

Accepted. 

POST-OFFICE SQUARE. 

Alderman Power, for the Committee on Paving, 
submitted a report recommending leave to with- 
draw on the several petitions in favor of changing 
the name of Post Office square to Farraguc 
square. 

The question was on the acceptance of the re- 
port. 

Alderman Quincy— This is a matter of compara- 
tively slight impoitance in comparison with other 
interests which will be brought before us; but, at 
the same time I do not feel like voting to give 
these petitioners leave to withdraw, and will give 
my reasons in a very few words, and content my- 
self with recording my vote. We have, on the 
one side, a strong petition from officers and gen- 
tlemen representing Che navy, supported by many 
prominent business firms not exactly abutters on 
the square, but m that immediate vicinity, asking 
us to £,ive a patriotic name to a locality which is 
destined to become an important business centre. 
On the other hand we have the remonstrances of 
the abutters, few in number, who claim to have 
been put to a great expense for stationery, which 
will have to be sacrificed if the name is changed. 
They also claim, or it was suggested by one of 
them, that tbe name Post office square will have a 
commercial value. That is true; but it seems 
to me that business centres have a value in 
themselves. Washington, Federal and Congress 
are all the names of business centres, and Far- 
ragut square will be just as well known, especially 
after the distinction this little discussion has 
given it, as Post Office square. I rather like the 
idea of giving a patriotic name to a business 
centre. Jackson square, in New Orleans, is just 
as good a business name as if it had been named 
after cotton bales or gunny bags. Then it would 
be well to remind the business world that there is 
something to be remembered besides thf almighty 
dollar, and T should like to have the name of the 
old heroin that square, amid the whirl of busi- 
ness, rather than have it on some park outside of 
the commercial part of th.3 city; and, therefore, I 
should like to ask those gentlemen to sacrifice the 
money they have expended for stationery. 

Aldermen Power — Of course the members of the 
old Board will remember that the uieiits of both 
sides of this question were fully discussed last 
year, and that the previous! Government thought 
the interests of the city would be best served by 
naming this square Post Office square. So far as 
the change goes, there does n't seem to be any 
argument iu favor of it, except the question of 
patriotism, which has been brought in here by 
parties who have endeavored to work upon your 
sympathies and arouse your patriotism, as if there 
was any doubt that those who desire the name 
to remain Post Office square had not as large 
an amount of patriotism as those who wish 
the change. Those who desire the name to 
remain are immediately interested; they are 
those who, with one exception, are the owners 
and occupants of the property. Most of those 
who desire the charge are not citizens or 
taxpayers of Boston. It seems to me that this 
is purely a business matter; those gentlemen 
who own property about there thmk their busi- 
ness will be damaged somewhat by a change, 
and, therefore they take a great interest in it. Of 
course, when it was named Post Office square, the 
abutters had not gone to any expense, and there 
was no great feeling iu the minds of the commit- 
tee, one way or another; but when the people who 
owned property there came before the committee 
of last year, we thought their arguments were the 
hest, and it was named Post Office square. Since 
then all th.« abutters on the square have bad their 
letters, billheads and books printed or engraved, 
at great expense, and, therefore, that seems 



JANUARY 25, 187 5. 



31 



to me to be a reason to let it lemain as it 
is. Those who ask for a change are busi- 
ness men at a distance ; and you can readily see, 
gentlemen, how easy it is to get petitioners to 
name a place for a great man like Admiral Farra- 
gut. I presume they could bave got almost every- 
body in Boston to sign the petition if nothing of 
the merits of the case was known. Therefore the 
reasons given by the gentlemen outside should' 
have no weight with you in this matter; at any 
rate they do not have with the present committee, 
nor did they with that of last year. Mr. Fox, ex- 
Secretary of the Navy, came here to represent the 
petitioners in favor of the change, and he made 
a very patriotic speech. I heartily agree 
with him in all that he said in relation to Admiral 
Farragut, as no doubt do all of you; and he could 
not — it was not ia his power to — pay him the trib- 
ute and honor that he deserves. But that should 
have no bearing on this question at all. If you 
wish to name a square for Admiral Farragut, let 
it be sojae ornamental square like the Public Gar- 
den, not a busy thoroughfare like this— or, as was 
suggested, give that name to one < f the new 
parks, which, it seems to me, would be more ap- 
propriate. Therefore*, I hope the action of the 
committee will be sustained by this Board. 

Alderman Harris called for the yeas and nays, 
and the report was accepted — yeas 7, nays 5: 

Yeas — Aldermen Bigelow, ' Burrage, O'Biien, 
Pope, Power, Stebbins, Viles— 7. 

Nays — Aldermen Clark, Harris, Prescott, 
Quincy, Worthington — 5. 

THE MOVING OF BUILDINGS. 

Alderman Power offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Paving be re- 
quested to report rules to regulate the movintr of 
buildings through the public streets of this city. 

Passed. 

Alderman Power, for the Committee on Paving, 
submitted the following: 

Ordered, That permission be grauted to William 
R. Cavanagh to move a wooden building from 
Hampden street between George and Eustis 
streets through Hampden, Dudley, Stoughton, 
Pieasant, Commercial, Dorchester avenue and 
Adams streets to Adams streec corner of Gibson 
street, upon condition that said Cavanagh shall 
first give to the city an agreement in writing sat- 
isfactory to the City Solicitor, saving the city 
harmless against any and all claims for dam- 
age , costs or expenses for or on account of, or in 
any way growing out of the moving oi saici build- 
ing through said streets; also upon condition that 
said Cavanagh shall first obtain and file in the of- 
fice of the Supeiiatendent of Streets a permir. 
fiom the Superintendent of the New Yoik & New 
England Railroad to move saiu building acto.a the 
tracks of said railroad on Dudley street; also a 
permit from the Superintendent of the Olri Colony 
Railroad to move said building across the tracks of 
said road on Adams street; and also permits 
from the Metropolitan and Highland Street rail- 
road« to move said building upon and over their 
tracks oti the above described route. 

Read-twice and passed. 

PAVING ORDERS. 

Alderman Power, for the same committf e, sub- 
mitted orders for the collection of sidewalk and 
edgestone assessments, as per schedule of cost 
thereof submitted by Superintendent of Streets, 
as follows: For sidewalks— Bennington street, 
$609.15; Brooks street, $2110.41; Chelsea street, 
$1258 95; G street, $533.23; Gold street, $242.71 ; 
Athens street, $259.49; Athens street, $1808.75; 
Saratoga street, $2908.89. For edgestones— Sara- 
toga street, $411.39; Eighth and M streets, $410.31. 
The orders weie severally reaa twice and passed. 

Alderman Power, for the same committee, sub- 
mitted the following : 

Ordered, That the amount assessed to W. S. 
Kingsbury, Dec. 7, 1874, for sidewalk on Eustis 
street, corner of Hampden street, be abated, he 
having paid for the same previous to assessment. 

Ordered, That the amount assessed to Samuel 
E. Sawyer, for sidewalk on Millmont street, Ward 
15, be abated, and the same assessed to MaryB., 
wife of Charles E. Pike. 

Ordered, That the amount assessed to F. W. 
Kittredge, for edgestones on Washington street, 
Ward 17, be abated, and the same asses-sed to H. 
S. Shepard & Chester. 

Ordered, That the amour t assessed to George 
Putnam, Jr., for edgestones on Parker street, 
Ward 15, be abated, and the same assessed to 
Charles Ward. 

Ordered, That the amount assessed to F. W. 
Kittredge for edgestones on School street, Ward 



17, be abated, and the same assessed on Eliza, 
wife of Eiastus W. Sanborn. 

Ordered, That the sum of $26.53 be abated from 
the sidewalk assessment of Edward Foye, on Silver 
street, and the same assessed to Mary E. Murphy. 

Ordered, That the sum of $4.32 be abated fiom 
the sidewalk assessment of William Moran, on 
Bolton stieet, said amount being assessed in error. 

Ordered, That the sum of $20.50 be abated from 
the edgestone assessment of William P. Morse, on 
Trenton street, and the same be reassessed as fol- 
lows, viz.: Galjn Poole, Jr., $10.25; Alden B. Fos- 
ter, $10.25. 

Severally read twice and nassed. 

PERMITS FOR STEAM ENGINES. 

Alderman Power, for the Committee on Steam 
Engines, submitted reports in favor of granting 
permits to locate and use steam engines and boil- 
ers by George H. Ellis, at 7 Tremont place, and 
John W. Greenleaf, at corner of Albany and East 
Canton streets. Severally accepted. 

REMOVAL OF TREES. 

Alderman Power, for the Committee on Com- 
mon on the part of the Board, submitted a report 
in favor of allowing E. C. Millett to remove four 
trees from Browns avenue and Ashland street, 
Ward 17, at his own expense and under the direc- 
tion of the Superintendent of Common, etc. Ac- 
cepted. 

Also, an order for a hearing on Monday, Feb. 8, 
at tour o'clock P. M on expediency of removing 
a tree frotu the roadwayat the coiner of Main and 
Henley stieets, Charlestown, when all persons ob- 
jecting thereto may appear and be heard. Order 
pa- sed. 

ORDERS TO PAY FOR STREET DAMAGES. 

Alderman Harris, for the Committee on Streets 
on the patt of the Board, submitted orders to pay 
for street damages, as follows: 

Order to pay John C. O'Callahan $163.60— widen- 
ing of Columbia street. Re^.d twr e, on motion 
of Alderman Hams, and passed. 

Order to pay Horace B. Sargent $7197.50— widen- 
ing of Shawmut a/enue. Read once. 

Order to pay Ander.-on P. Breed and another, 
$4850.55- South Eoen street, Chailestown ; the 
same being the award of a juiy, with interest 
costs, etc. Read twice, on motion of Alderman 
Harris, and passed. 

NOMINATION OF ASSESSORS. 

Alderman Harris, for the Joint Committee on 
Assessors' Department, submitted a report rec- 
ommending the election of Thomas Hills, Benja- 
min Cushmg, Thomas J. Bancroft, Horace Smith 
and Benjamin F. Palmer, as Assessors. The report 
was accepted, and the nominations were laid over 
undei the rule. 

SUPPLIES FOR HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Alderman Worthington offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Superintendent 'of Health be 
authorized, during the present municipal year, to 
make contiacts, subject to the supervision of the 
Committee on Health, for the purchase of such 
quantities of hay or grain and for such horses and 
exchanges as his department may from time to 
time require ; also, for such material as shall be 
required for the use of this department. 

Read twice, on motion of Alderman Worthing- 
ton, and passed. Sent down. 

PAYMENT OF JUDGMENTS, ETC. 

Alderman Worthington offered the following: 
Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be author- 
ized, with the approval of the Committee on 
Claims, to draw upon the Treasurer for the pay- 
ment of all executions or judgments of court 
against the city, when properly certified as cor- 
rect by the City Solicitor. 

Read twice, on motion of Alderman Worthington, 
and passed. Sent down. 

THE POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Alderman Burrage submitted the following: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Police be au- 
thorized to make such airangements as they deem 
expedient for keeping the horses used in the Po- 
lice Department; the expense to be charged to the 
appropriation for Police. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Police be au- 
thorized to purchase, from time to time, such fur- 
niture and supplies as may be required for the 
use of the Police Department; the expense to be 
charged to the appropriation for Police. 

Ordered, That the Comrr ittee on Police be au- 
thorized to make such repairs as may be necessary 
for the care and preservation of the several po- 
lice stations and the police steamboat; the ex- 
pense to be charged to the appropriation for Police. 

Severally read twice, on motion of Alderman 
Burrage, and passed. 



22 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



SUPPLIES FOR SURVEYOR'S DEPARTMENT. 

Alderman O'Brien offered the following: 
Ordered, That the City Surveyor be authorized, 
with the approval of the Joint Standing Commit- 
tee on the Surveyor's Department, to make such 
purchases of supplies, instruments, drawing ma- 
terials and furniture, and to incur such other ex- 
penses as may be necessary for his department 
during the present municipal year. 
Read once. 

REPAIRS ON BATH HOUSES. 

Alderman Power offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on 
Batbing be authorized to make such repairs as 
may be necessary on the several bathing houses 
owned by the city, and also to employ such assist- 
ance as may bg required for the care and preser- 
vation of said houses; the expense to be charged 
to the appropriation for Public Baths. 

Read twice, on motion of Alderman Power, and 
passed. Sent down. < 

ADDITIONAL WATER SUPPLY. 

Alderman Stebbms, for the Joint Committee on 
Water, to whom was referred the request of the 
Cochituate Water Board for an appropriation of 
$1,530,000 to be expended in providing stoi age ba- 
sins on tte Sudbury River, an additional supply 
pipe across Charles River on the line of the Co- 
chituate aqueduct, and in constructing a new 
conduit, submitted a report recommending that 
the request be granted, and that it be referred to 
the Committee on Finance to report an order pro- 
viding tne means. Report accepted and reference 
ordered. Sent down. 

ALDERMEN'S CONTINGENT FUND. ■ 

Alderman Stebbins offered the following : 
Ordered, That the Chairman of the Board of 
Aldermen be authorized to approve bills for ex- 
penses incurred by the Boaid of Aldermen, and 
the standing committees of the Board not having 
charge of any appropriations ; also, by individual 
members of the Board while engaged in the dis- 
charge of official duty ; the amount of said bills 
to be charged to the appropriation for Contingent 
Expenses of the Board ot Aldermen. 

Read twice, on motion of Alderman Stebbins, 
and passed. 

REPAIRS ON COUNTY BUILDINGS. 

Alderman Prescott offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Committee on County Build- 
ings be and they are hereby authorized to cause 
such repairs and alterations to be made as may be 
needed on the Court House, County Jaii and Pro- 
bate Building; also on the Municipal Court rooms 
in the Highlands, Doi Chester, West Roxbury, 
Briehton, Ciiarlestown, East and South Boston, 
provided said repairs and alterations shall not 
exceed the sum of $5000 during the municipal 
year; the expense there! or to be charged to the 
appropriation for the County of Suffolk. 

Ordered, That the Committee on County Build- 
ings be authorized to provide the necessary fur- 
niture for the Court House aid Probate Building; 
also for the Municipal Courtrooms, Highlands, 
Dorchester, West Roxbury, Brighton, Charlestown, 
East and feouth Boston; the. expense therefor to 
be charged to the appropriation tor the County of 
Suffolk. 

Severally read once, 

REPAIRS ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Alderman Prescott offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on 
Public Buildings be authorized to supply the ne- 
cessary furniture for and cause to be made such 
repairs and cleaning as may be needed upon the 
City Hall ; also such repairs on the police station 
houses and engine houses, together with other 
public buildings as are not made by the respective 
depattments using them; the expense therefor to 
be charged to the appropriation for Public Build- 
ings. 

Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee 
on Public Buddings be authorized to supply the 
necessary furniture for and cause to be made such 
repairs and cleaning as may be needed in the sev- 
eral high, grammar and primary sclioolhouses ; 
the expense therefor to be charged to the appro- 
priation far Sclioolhouses, Public Buildings. 

Severally read once. 

LAW BOOKS. 

Alderman Quincy offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Committee on Ordinances be 
authorized to purchase law books for the City So- 
licitor's office, at an expense not exceeding $275; 
said sum to be charged to the appropriation for 
Incidentals. 
Read once. 

ADDITIONAL ASSISTANCE IN LAW DEPARTMENT. 

Alderman Quincy, for the Joint Committee on 
Ordinances, to whom.was referred, as a part of the 



unfinished business of the last City Council, an 
ordinance providing additional assistance in the 
Law Department, submitted a report recommend- 
ing the passage of the following: 
An Ordinance to amend an Ordinance Relating to 

the Law Department. 

Be it ordained, etc. 

. Section 1. The ordinance relating to the Law 
Department is hereby amended so as to authorize 
the Mayor to nominate, and by and with the ad- 
vice and consent of the Standing Committee of 
the City Council on Ordinances, appoint a fourth 
Assistant Solicitor, who shall possess the same 
qualifications, and hold his office upon the same 
tenure as the other assistants. He "shall perform 
such professional duties incident to the office as 
may be required of him by the City Solicitor. 

Section 2. Whenever in the opinion of the 
Mayor such an emergency arises as to require that 
addit'onal assistance should be furnisned in the 
Law Department, the Mayor may, with the ap- 
proval of the Committee on Claims, provide such 
assistance for the time being as he may deem ex- 
pedient; and the compensation therefor shall be 
established by the Committee, on Claims - 

Read once, and, on motion of Alderman Pres- 
cott, ordered to be printed. 

CENSUS AND REVISION OF WARDS. 

Alderman Quincy, for the joint special commit- 
tee to whom was referred so much of the Mayor's 
address as relates to the census and the revision 
of the wards, submitted a report, in part, at this 
time, recommending the passage of the accompa- 
nying orders : 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be re- 
quested to pttition the Legislature for the passage 
of an act authorizing the Mayor and Aldermen to 
appoint agents to take the decennial census and 
the industrial statistics in the city of Boston, 
in accordance with the provisions of law. 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to petition the Legislature for the passage of 
an act authorizing the division of the city of 
Boston into such number of wards, not, exceeding 
thirty, as the City Council may prescribe ; and 
providing that each ward shall be entitled to two 
represe tatives in the Common Council and two 
in the School Committee, and that the City Coun- 
cil shall have autroiity, from time to time, to di- 
vide the several wards into such number of vot- 
ing precincts, not exceeding three in each ward, 
as they may deem expedient. 

Alderman Quincy — I should like to move for the 
second reading, at the present time, ot the first or- 
der, relating to the decennial census. The reasons 
for desiring it to pass at the piesent time and to 
have the city appear before the Legislature as soon 
as possible, are as follows: The General Statutes 
provide that the decennial census shall be taken 
agents appointed by the local authorities, the by 
selectmen of towns and the mayors and alder- 
men of cities, and it stood so until last year. 
In 1865 an act was passed for the collection 
of an immense amount of industrial statistics, 
by agents, provided that they should be appoint- 
ed by the local authonties, and who need not be 
the same as those who are to take the census. 
But in X874, for some reason— it has been suggest- 
ed that it was to give the Bureau of Statistics of 
Labor something to do which should justify their 
. continued existence — it was provided that not 
only the census, but the collection of this immense 
mass of statistics, shtuld be undertaken by such 
local assessors as should be designated by this 
bureau at the State House. We have the authori- 
ty of the chief of the Assessors' Department that 
the undertaking of this labor by them would be 
absurd, overworked as they already are, and + hat 
either the city's business would be neglected, or 
the work of collecting the' statistics badly per- 
formed. In consideration of the fact that an 
attack has been made upon the Labor Bureau, and 
the chances are that the census matter will be 
taken from them, it is important that the city of 
Boston should appear at the State House asking 
that it be put back where it was before,— that is, 
taken by agents appointed by the local authori- 
ties. This order authorizes the Mayor to ask for 
legislation authorizing the appointment of agents 
to do this work as it has been done heretofore, and 
not have it put upon an already overworked 
Board of Assessors. It is desirable that the atti- 
tude of the city in this matter should be taken at 
once, and I ask that the order may take its second 
reading today. 

The order relating to the census was read a sec- 
ond time, and passed and sent down, and the or- 
der relating to the division of wards went over 
under the rule. 

On motion of Alderman Power, the Board ad- 
journed. 



23 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JANUARY 28, 1875. 



Regularj weekly meeting at 7% P. M., Halsey J 
Boardman, President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN FOR CON- 
CURRENCE. 

Annual reports of the Superintendent of Public 
Buildings and City Surveyor. Placed on file. 

Notice of appointment of members of the Com- 
mon Council as Special Police Officers without 
pay. 

Petitions ot Herman Grundel, Company E, 
Ninth Regiment Infantry, Charles R. Classes. 

Orders authorizing the Superintendent of Health 
to contract for the purchase of hay and grain, and 
such horses and exchanges as may be required 
for his department from time to time ; authoriz- 
ing the Mayor to draw upon the Treasurer for the 
payment of executions and judgments of court 
against the city; authorizing the Committee on 
Bathing to make necessary repairs on bath houses 
and to employ assistance for the care of the same. 
Severally ordered to a second reading. 

Report nominating Thomas Hills, Benjamin 
Cushing, Thomas J. Bancroft, Horace Smith and 
Benjamin F. Palmer as assessors. Accepted and 
nominations laid over. 

Report recommending the granting of the re- 
quest of the Cochituate Water Board for an ap- 
propriation of $1,530,000, for a new conduit, a new 
siphon and for storage basins ; and reference of 
the same to the Committee on Finance. Report 
accepted and reference ordered. 

Certificate of the election by the Board of Alder- 
men of Uriel H. Crocker as a member of the Co- 
chituate Water Board, in place of Amos L. Noyes, 
chosen by this CouncU. The Council proceeded 
to ballot. Messrs. Morrison of Ward 9, Jaques of 
Ward 9, and Moone.y of Ward 2 were appointed a 
committee to receive, sort and count votes. They 
reported as follows: 

Whole number of votes cast 63 

Necessary to a choice 32 

Amos L. Noyes had 40 

Uriel H. CrocKer 23 

And Mr. Noyes was declared elected, in non-con- 
currence. Certificate sent up. 

Report on joint rules and orders of the City 
Council (City Doc. No. 14), and order establishing 
the same. Read a second time and put upon its 
passage. 

Mr. Fitzgerald of Ward 7—1 should like to in- 
quire of the committee in what the joint rules of 
this year differ from those of last year? 

Mr. Sprague of Ward 4— The principal differ- 
ence will be seen to be in the arrangement and 
statement of the different rules. The committee 
intended to make but very few substantial changes. 
The only such changes, I think, are in rules 10 and 
16. In rule 10, in the second line, it is proposed 
to change by inserting the words "unless other- 
wise ordered by the City Council or by the com- 
mittee." I believe this rule, as it stands at pres« 
eut, was adopted a year ago ; but it has been 
represented to the committee that it was almost 
impossible not to violate it at certain times in the 
year. It sometimes seems necessary that reports 
should go to one board or the other, as it may 
save time. This is the case about the time of 
the summer vacation and at the end of the year; 
and to keep the rule precisely as it was last 
year would retard business. The committee 
intended to preserve the spirit of ths rule, 
bnt to give the committee discretionary power 
in the matter. A change has also been "made in 
rule 16, by including under it "boards and 
officers" having charge of appropriations, as well 
as '■committees," the words "Boards and officers" 
having been inserted in two places. There 
seemed to be no reason why boards and officers 
having the charge of appropriations of money 
should not be brought within that rule, as well as 
committees, so that neither can spend the money, 
or a portion of it, on objects other than those for 
which they asked to have it appropriated. As I 
said, the other changes are principally in the ar- 
rangement and statement, which the committee 
iutended to simplify. 

The order was passed. 



Report and order requesting the Mayor to pe- 
tition the Legislature for the passage of an ret 
authorizing the Mayor and Aldermen to take the 
decennial census and the industrial statistics in 
the city. Order read twice and passed. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order for the Mayor to appoint three commis- 
sioners to investigate and report — 1. On the 
qual ity and price of gas furnished in this city as 
compared with that furnished in other localities. 
2. Whether any improvements can be made in 
the methods of manufactuie. 3. Whether it 
would be expedient for the city to undertake the 
manufacture and supply of gas for public light- 
ing; and, 4. Whether any further legislation is 
necessary to enable gas consumers to obtain a 
prompt and impartial investigation into com- 
plaints made to gas companies, etc. Said com- 
missioners to serve without compensation, except 
for necessary personal or clerical expenses. 
Passed, in concurrence. 

ELECTIONS. 

The following matters came up under the head 
of unfinished business : 

Directors for Public Institutions. Nomination 
of James Power of the Board of Aldermen and 
Cyrus A. Page and William C. Burgess of the 
Common Council, as Directors for Public Institu- 
tions. The Council proceeded to ballot. Messrs. 
Wilbur of Ward 13, Barry of Ward 7, and Beal of 
Ward 16 were appointed a committee to receive, 
sort and count votes. They reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes cast 67 

Necessary to a choice 34 

Alderman James Power had 65 

" Hugh O'Brien 1 

Councilman Cyrus A. Page 54 

" William C. Burgess 34 

William G. Train 34 

Richard Power 4 

" John N. Devereaux 1 

" James J. Flynn 1 

Alderman Power and Councilman Page were 
declared elected, and a second ballot, to fill the 
vacancy caused by the tie vote, was held, with the 
following result: 

Whole number of votes cast 65 

Necessary to a choice 33 

William C. Burgess 34 

William G. Tram 29 

Richard Power 1 

And two ballots bearing the names of "Burgess" and 
"Train" each. 

Mr. Burgess was declared elected. 

Certificate sent up. 

Trustees of Public Library. Nomination of 
John T. Clark of the Board of Aldermen and 
Charles A. Burditt and David P. Kimball of the 
Common Council, as Trustees of the Public 
Library. The Council proceeded to ballot. Messrs. 
Pierce of Ward 11, Harrigan of Ward 1, and 
Osborne of Ward 8 were appointed a committee to 
receive, sort and count votes. They reported as 
follows : 

Whole number of votes cast 66 

Necessary to a choice 34 

Alderman John T. Clark had 65 

Councilman Charles A. Burditt 65 

" David P. Kimball 65 

And they were declared elected. 
Certificate sent up. 

BADGES. 

Order for the appointment of a special commit- 
tee to procure badges for the members of the 
Common Council came up under the head of un- 
finished business. 

Mr. Kimball ot Ward 6—1 move to amend the 
order by inserting before the word "members" 
the word "such," and after the word "Coun- 
cil" the words "as may desire them," so that 
it shall read "procure badges for such mem- 
bers of the Common Council as may desire 
them." The proposed amendment, it seems to 
me, explains itself; it is simply to procure badges 
for such members of this "Council as want 
them, and for no others, Doubtless there are 
many members — I happen to know that there are 
some — who, like myself, have not had occasion 
during the past year to make any use whatever of 
their badges. It seems to me that if there are any 
members, old or new, wLo do not desire badges, it 
should be at their election to refuse them or not, 
to have them made for them or not. I hope that 
those who do not desire badges shall be allowed 
not to take them. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 16—1 am very glad the gen- 
tleman from Ward 6 has offered this amendment. 
I hope and have no doubt it will prevail. I move 



JANUARY 28, 1875. 



24 



to farther amend by adding at the end 
of the order the words "not to exceed six dollars 
each." I do not see, Mr. President, why the city 
of Boston should be called upon to furnish these 
badges at all; ana I shall vote against the order 
in toto, as I did last year. Certainly nothing 
conies from them, and what do they signify? But, 
if it must be done — if these, which are to be the 
insignia of a position in this body, are to he adopt- 
ed — an expense of $5 or $6 is just as well for all 
practical purposes for which this badge is intend- 
ed bv those who wish to u.se it, and it will answer 
the purpose just as well as it will to spend $12 or 
§15, as we did last year. 

The question was upon the amendment of Mr. 
Kimball. 

Mr. Jaques of 9—1 am beartily in accord with 
the gentlemen who have spoken, in the spirit of 
what they have said ; but I am rather sorry that 
these amendments have been offered, because I 
think the question ought to have been met as a 
whole and not in this half way. I think the whole 
thing is wrong from beginning to end — wrong in 
its spirit and conception. The appointment of 
members of the Common Council as special 
police officers puts this body, I think, in an un- 
digni fied position. If I understand it, this Council 
is a legislative body; its functions are to make 
laws and rules for the government of this city, 
and not to execute them as policemen. If it be 
said that emergencies may arise where it would 
be desirable to have them act as officers — they are 
liable to be called upon as pajt of a posse com- 
mitatus— as good citizen? they can offer their ser- 
vices at any time. Therefore, it appears to me 
that this subject, being the first appropriation 
asked for, comes up early every year as a sort of test 
question, although it is apparently a trivial mat- 
ter; and that question is whether the mem- 
bers of the Council will say, Shall we set our 
faces sternly against the appropriation of any 
money that is not necessary and judicious and not 
for the good of the city ? or, shall we use laxity in 
regard to a meagure that appeals only to our van- 
ity ? This has got to be a test of that very princi- 
ple, and it is more so because it is a simple oue. 
On other questions members may have different 
opinions upon different points, but nothing can 
come up where the question rests more upon prin- 
ciple than this. It is a mere question of appeal- 
ing to our vanity. Now, assuming that it is de- 
sirable that this body should serve as special po- 
lice, the sincerity of our feelings can be as well 
shown by adopting a very simple badge as by an 
expensive one. If we are called upon, in case of 
disturbance, where it would he useful, would any 
gentleman care whether his badge was made of 
tin or gold ? If we decide to accept the positions 
of policemen assigned to us, it appears to me that 
we should have a very simple badge. I hope the 
♦..amendment will not prevail. 

Mr. Fitzgerald of Ward 7—1 think, with the gen- 
tleman who has just sat down, that we should kill 
this whole matter. I was a member of this Coun- 
cil two or three years ago and got one of those 
magnificent badges ; I always looked with a great 
deal of veneration upon it, and I wonder how 
those gentlemen with eight or nine badges feel 
when they take them out of the drawer to look at 
them. Now, if we are going to have a bacige, let 
us have a grand and magnificent one, be- 
cause it is to be a magnificent affair — it is 
like the shoulder straps and epaulets of the 
army officer. Let us have some such badges if we 
have any at all. What would we do without 
badges? Jlf a great fire should occur, as 
one gentleman said to me, where would the flames 
be if we were not allowed to enter the lines? 
Why, sir, the whole city would be consumed be- 
cause we could n't enter the lines. That is conclu- 
sive proof why we should have gold badges. The 
other police officers get tin badges, but they get $3 
a day, while we serve a whole year for nothing; 
and why should n't we have gold badges? If we 
are to have badges, let us have magnificent ones, 
because they are purely ornamental. I belong to 
this body, and why should n't I have something 
to distinguish me from the common herd? If I 
want to go to the Howard Athenaeum, why should 
n't I have something to distinguish me from the 
common public, and pass me in free? Let us 
have them magnificent, if we have them at all. 
But in all truth and seriousness, what use are 
they? What do we need of them? What do we 
want to be special police officers for? What 
duty will we have to perform that will 
require them? I am afraid that when 
an exigency occurs .we would be found 



non est— more anxious to hide our gold badges 
than to show them. If we are to be special police 
officeis, year after year, why should n't the badge 
of last year do for this year, if it is simply to show 
that we are police officers ? I say it is a custom 
more honored in the breach than in the observ- 
ance, and the City Government that disposes of 
this question forever and aye will deserve the grat- 
itude of the people, because it is an expenditure of 
$1500 for no earthly use than to gratify the vanity of 
the members of the Common Council. We want to 
have something to distinguish us from everybody 
else, and say when we open our coats that this is the 
insignia of office of members of the Common 
Council. The sooner we get rid of this thing the 
oetter. I, for one, will oppose the amendment of 
the gentleman from Ward 6, and the whole order, 
too. 

The amendment of Mr. Kimball was lost, and 
the question was upon the amendment of Mr. 
Perkins. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6 — I desire to say a few 
words upon the amendment of the gentleman 
from Ward 1G, and I shall speak seriously. When 
I offered the amendment to the original order it 
was not with the intention, as the member before 
me assumed, of killing the whole measure. I of- 
fered it honestly for the purpose of being able if I 
saw fit, not only to decline to take the badge 
made for me, but to ask this Council that a badge 
should not be made for me. The gentleman from 
Ward 16 offeied an amendment that the 
expense of the badges should be reduc- 
ed to $6 each. I hope that amendment 
will prevail. If we need a badge at all 
it is for use, and a cheap badge is as useful and 
serviceable as an expensive one. That genrlemen 
of this Council may know how much is being ex- 
pended here for badges I would state that in the 
years included between 1857 and 1867, $981 were 
spent for badges for both branches of the City 
Government; while from 1868 to the present time 
this branch alone has spent $7500. Now, it does 
seem to me that it is time to stop. Those gentle- 
men who were here with me last year know that I 
attempted to stop this enormous annual expendi- 
ture for ornament. I desire again this year to 
ask the Council to adopt a cheap badge, and as 
such I would cheerfully favor the price limiting it 
to $6. If we are to have badges and every mem- 
ber of the Council must have one, let us have a 
cheap one. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6—1 entirely agree with my 
colleague that we ought not to spend $15 for abadge. 
I differ from some of those who have spoken, in 
thinking that a badge, if it can be a proper one, is 
convenient to have upon certain occasions. While 
I shall feel it my duty to vote against any order 
authorizing an expenditure of $15 for a badge, as 
we did last year, and while I shall oppose an un- 
limited expenditure for the purpose, I should be 
in favor of supplying all members of this body* 
with badges to cost not over $6, for which sum I 
think appropriate badges can be obtained. They 
are very convenient upon many occasions, and I 
think no one can reasonably find fault at that 
price. 

The amendment of Mr. Perkins was lost by a 
rising vote — 21 for, 32 against. 

Mr. Parker of Ward 14 offered the following as 
a substitute : 

Ordered, That the Joint Special Committee on 
the Celebration of the One Hundredth Anniver- 
sary of the Battle of Bunker Hill be requested to 
consider and report upon the propriety of causing 
a medal to be constructed commemorative of those 
great events which led to the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5—1 raise the question of or- 
der whether that is proper as a substitute, and — 

The President— Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 has the 
floor. 

Mr. Flynn — I was about to raise the same point, 
that the'order offered as a substitute is not ger- 
mane to the subject under consideration. 

The President — The point is well taken. 

Mr. Fitzgerald of Ward 7— Does the Chair rule 
that we cannot get medals? 

The President— The Chair is of opinion that the 
order offered as a substitute proposes to award 
something in the future that does not necessarily 
or apparently, in the judgment of the Chair, fill 
the place that is proposed by the order for badges. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5—1 had supposed that when 
this small question of badges was to arise this 
year it would be treated in the same manner 
which it has been heretofore, and that is with rid- 
icule. Now, if I remember aright, there are some 



25 



COMMON COUNCIL 



forty new members this year, more than a majori- 
ty, and I think the new members are entitled to 
as decent and respectable a badge as has been 
customary for the older members to receive and 
use. I have some two or three badges now, one 
nearly twenty years old, which cost seventy-five 
cents, when I was in the Council in 1857; I have 
the badge of last year and the year before, both 
of which I propose to keep as long as I 
live, and hand down to my children to show 
them that I have had the honor of being 
a member of the Common Council here ; and I be- 
lieve that the new members here are entitled to 
have the distinction, the honor of being pointed 
out as members of this honorable body, not only 
to the present generation, but to the future gen- 
erations. And whether they use ttiose badges in 
performing the duties of policemen or otherwise, 
they are insignia here, no matter whether it is 
in Boston or any other part of the country, and 
they are able to show them whether in good or 
evil report. And I conceive it to be an honor to 
which each member is entitled. I hope it will not 
be frivolously treated. I agree with the gentle- 
man from Ward 6 that he is perfectly consistent 
in offering the amendment that he did. I think 
he was a member of the committee last year, and 
a handsome badse it was. Whether the badges 
are to cost six dollars or twenty-rive cents 
is not the question. We pa*s through orders for 
the appropriation of millions of dollars here 
without taking one tithe of the time that we 
spend talking upon this subject. I believe we are 
belittling ourselves in discussing this subject. I 
believe it is our duty to vote these badges, espe- 
cially when many members of this body are new 
in the position. "Notice has been received that his 
honor the Mayor has appointed and the Board of 
Aldermen have confirmed this body as special po- 
lice officers. Now, is it known what are the du- 
ties incumbent upon these gentlemen as special 
police'? Is it known that special police have no 
right to exercise the prerogatives of police offi- 
cers any more than any other individual ? That is 
law, sir, coming from me who am not a lawyer. 
That has been so decided by the City Solicitor. 
They will not be called upon to exercise that au- 
thority any more than I will have as an humble pri- 
vate citizen. Each private citizen is bound by the 
common law to exercise the duty of policeman 
when called upon. That everybody knows. Butitis 
almost useless- to discuss this matter. I think the 
Council is ready to vote for a badge. As for vot- 
ing for a three-cent badge, I am opposed to it. I am 
willing to vote for such a committee as you, sir, 
in your judgment shall appoint, to select a badge. 
I hope the order will pass without any amend- 
ment and that the committee will select a decent 
and respectable badge, and if any member here 
sees fit, he can refuse it, and say so from his seat 
in the Council, and there take the honor of it, if 
honor it may be. I believe that history doesn't 
tell of a single individual yet who refused to take 
his badge, and I don't believe that history will 
reveal any such a member even in our honorable 
Council of 1875; when a handsome badge is pro- 
duced here, 100 years after the Declaration of In- 
dependence, I don't believe any member will rise 
in his place, and say, "I spurn it, and so take it, 
Mr. President, and use it as you think fit." I don't 
believe that man exists. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 16— The practical question 
which comes up is, as the gentleman before me 
has remarked, What earthly use is this badge to 
be to any of us? I do not want it to hold up to 
my children, when I get to be an old man, 
to show that I had the honor of being a member 
of this body. If I can do nothing to teach my 
friends that I have had the honor to sit in this 
body; if I shall do nothing to impress it upon their 
memories, except to wear a tin or gold badge upon 
my body, I shall have labored in vain. The gen- 
tleman from Ward 5 says he does n't believe any 
members of this body will decline the badge. I 
respectfully decline it. I hope the order will not 
pass. There is no sense or propriety in taking 
$1500 out of the treasury to gratify the vanity of 
members. 

Mr. Jaques of Ward 9— The gentleman from 
Ward 5 says a great deal of time is spent upon 
apparently trivial questions. One consideration 
occurs to me,which shows that it has an important 
bearing upon this subject. The question is., whether 
we shall vote to spend money which we believe 
to be thrown away, or shall we vote against such 
action? I believe that the easy virtue that will 
allow appropriations confessedly unnecessary and 
injudicious, if exhibited in a body like this, ex- 



poses that body to a want of confidence on the 
part of those who are represented, 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6—1 hope gentlemen will 
not allow themselves to be deceived by the state- 
ment that this is a matter of a few dollars and 
that we are going 10 appropriate much larger 
sums with much less talk. It is a question of 
how much money we shall vote into our pockets, 
and if we vote an extravagant sum for badges I 
think we may well beware. Gentlemen may rec- 
ollect something about the back-pay swindle. 
Members of Congress thought that that was a mat- 
ter of only a few thousands, but the sentiment 
of the whole nation was aroused on that subject, 
and a great many felt so ashamed of themselves 
that they paid the money back aa;ain. It seems to 
me that when we vote an extravagant sum for a 
gold or silver badge we put ourselves in the same 
position that those congressmen did who voted a 
few thousand dollars into their own pockets. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6—1 Cannot agree with the 
member from Ward 5, and be willing to trust the 
selection of a badge to any committee that you 
may appoint, sir; not that I lack confidence in 
you, but I think there should be some expression 
of opinion of the amount of money that we put 
ir>io each badge. It is quite evident that the 
Couucil is ready to vote upon this question, but I 
should like an expression of opinion that the 
badge should cost either $10, $15 or $20, 
and I move that the price shall not ex- 
ceed $10. Now, notwithstanding the com- 
pliments of the. gentleman from Ward 5 in 
regard to the badge of last year, I did not 
consider it a very handsome one. I think it was too 
large; the outside rim was too broad; there was 
too much space within the shield and the outside 
rim. I believe that we could get a small gold 
badge about the size of the inner rim of last 
years badge, with a raised shield, with the words 
"Boston Common Council," and do away with the 
name. If a badge shall be adopted which leaves 
off the name I shall most respectfully decline mine, 
because I do not want it. Mine has not been taken 
from the box in which it was given to me by the 
City Messenger since I carried it home that night. 
But if the Common Council determine to have a 
badge with the name of each member upon it, I 
shall most certainly take it, for some of our 
badges have been found where I don't want my 
name to go. I hope the Council will consider that 
the committee can get a gold badge for ten dollars, 
and will limit them to that sum. My experience 
last year was that every man who is goiug to offer 
a design knows exactly how much money we 
voted, and you cannot get a bid much under the 
price we propose to pay. 

Mr. Shavv of Ward 5—1 don't think I would 
differ much from my worthy friend from Ward 6; 
certainly not in this particular, and if the com- 
mittee is appointed, I wish he could be a member' 
of it, and then he can have his voice. I agree 
with him perfectly in regard to his criticism of 
last year's badge; it couid be improved, although 
I thought it was a handsome badge, and think so 
still. I hope that if the committee is appointed 
they will profit by his experience. As to "the crit- 
icism of my friend about the members of Con- 
gress and back pay, I think there is about as 
much relevancy in that as there is in the 
wind that blows across the Back Bay. Back 
pay! Who is going to get any back pay? That 
comparison isn't hardly worth notice. So ridic- 
ulous is it that it should be wafted down to 
Washington and carried down to New Orleans, 
and by and by Andy Johnson will get to Congress, 
and by and by he will make the welkin ring. 
Why, if my friend could get to be a member of 
Congress he could discuss the back-pay question 
and not come down to the Common Council. I 
hope this matter will pass right along as it ought 
to do. I have no question that a very handsome 
badge can be obtained for $10, and I hope the 
Council may^accept it and then let a competent 
committee be appointed to carry it out. 

Mr. Morrison of Ward 9 — As one of the forty 
new members, I had simply intended to vote 
against this measure, let it come in any way it 
does. But having had so much encouragement I 
would move that the whole subject be indefinitely 
postponed. 

The President ruled that the motion to indefi- 
nitely postpone was not in crder while the amend- 
ment was pending. 

The amendment of Mr. Kirnball was carried by 
a rising vote— 32 for, 26 against, 

Mr. Morrison renewed the motion to indefi- 
nitely postpone and Mr.Perkins called fortheyear 



JANUARY 38, 1875 



26 



and nays, which were ordered, and the motion to 
indefinitely postpone prevailed— yeas 35, nays 32 : 

Yeas— Messrs. Beal, Burditt, Cowley, Crocker, 
Curtis, Cushmg, Day, Pitzgerald, Goldthwait, 
Guild, Howes, Jaques, Kimball, Kingsbury, 
Leighton, Long, Loring, Morrison, Newton, Page, 
Parker, Peabody, PerkiDS, Pierce, Power, Samp- 
son, Smitti, Sprague, Stacey, Sweetser. Thacher, 
Train, Trull, Wadsworth, WiUcutt— 35. 

Navs— Messrs. Anderson, Barry, Bent, Burgess, 
Clarke, Collins, Coyle, Cushman,Devereaux, Dug- 
gan, Edwards, Fitzpatrick, Flynn, Harrigan, 
Hicks, Hiscock, Kelley, Kingsley, Lappen, Mo- 
ley, Mooney, Murray, Noyes, Osborne, Rice, 
Shaw, Sibley, Walsh, Whitcomb, Whitmore, Wil- 
bur, Woods— 32. 

Mi - . Perkins of Ward 16 moved a reconsideration 
of the last vote, hoping it would not prevail. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 moved that the motion to 
reconsider be specially assigned for half-past 
eight o'clock next Thursday evening, and the mo- 
tion was declared carried by a rising vote — 33 for, 
32 against. 

Mr. Perkins moved that the last vote be verified 
by yeas and nays. 

Mi\ Flynn called for the ruling of tlie Chair, as 
no doubt had been raised. 

Mr. Perkins said he intended to doubt the vote. 

The Chair ruled the motion in order. 

The yeas and nays were ordered. The motion to 
specially assign was lose — yeas 31, nays 35: 

Yeas — Mesors. Anderson, Barry, Bent, Burgess, 
Clarke, Collins, Coyle, Devereaux, Duggan, Ed- 
wards, FLzpatrick, Flynn, Harrigan, Hicks, Kel- 
ley, Kingsiey, Lappen, Moley, Mooney, Murray, 
Noyes, Osborne, Page, Power, Rice, Shaw, Sibley, 
Walsh, Whitmore, Wilbur, Woods— 31. 

Nays— Messrs. Beal, Burditt, Cawley, Crocker, 
Curtis, Cushing, Day, Fitzgerald, Goldthwait, 
Guild, Hiscock, Howes, Jaques, Kimball, Kings- 
bury, Leighton, Long, Loring, Morrison, Newton, 
Parker, Peabody, Perkins, Pierce, Sampson, 
Smith, Sprague, Stacey, Sweetser, Thacher, Train, 
Trull, Wadsworth, Whitcomb, WiJlcutt— 35. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 16 called for the yeas and 
nays on the question of reconsideration, and the 
motion was lost — yeas 27, nays 38: 

Yeas — Messrs. Anderson, Barry, Bent, Clarke, 
Collins, Cushman, Devereaax, Edwards, Fitzpat- 
rick, Flynn, Harrigan, Hicks, Kelley, Kingsley, 
Lappen, Moley, Mooney, Murray, Noyes, Osborne, 
Rice, Shaw, Sibley, Walsh, Whitcomb, Whitmore, 
Wilbur— 27. 

Nays— Me;*srs. Beal, Burditt, Burgess, Cawley, 
Crocker, Curtis, Cashing, Day, Fitzgerald, Gold- 
thwait, Guild, Hiscock, Howes, Jaques, Kimball, 
Kingsbury, Leighton, Long, Loring, Morrison, 
Newton, Page, Parker, Peabody, Perkins, Pierce, 
Power, Sampson, Smith, Sprague, Stacey, Sweet- 
ser. Thacher, Train, Trull, Wadsworth, Willcutt, 
Woods— 38. 

THE SINKING FUNDS. 

The semi-annual report of the Commissioners 
of the Sinking Funds (City Doc. No. 15) was re- 
ceived and sent upi 

The gross funded debt, Dec. 31, 1874, was $43,431,501.96 
The gross funded debt, June 30, 1874, was 42,735,785.77 

Increase of the gross funded debt during 
the six months ending Dec. 31,1874 $695,716.19 

The total amount of the redemption 

funds, Dec. 3i, 1874, was $14,329,994.73 

The total amount of redemption funds, 

June 31, 1874, was 14,264,451.30 

Increase of the redemption funds during 
the six months ending Dec. 31, 1874, 
was $65,543.43 

Netdebt, Dec. 31, 1874 $29,101,507.23 

Net debt, June 30, 1874 28,471,334.47 

Increase of the net debt during the six 

months ending June 30, 1874 $630,172.76 

The amount of debt redeemed at matu- 
rity, and cancelled with revenue funds, 
during the six" months $252,000.00 



Burnt District Sterling Loan Sinking Fund 265,410.33 

" " " Revenue Fund 25,001.55 

Mystic Water Works Sinking Fund 74,388.28 

Public Building Loans Sinking Fund 135,850.62 

" " Revenue Fund 360.32 

Street Improvement Loans Sinking Fund.. 366,596.09 

" Revenue Fund. 30,405.09 



Following is a statement of the sinking funds 
and debt: 

Revenue and Sinking Funds. 

General Debt Sinking Fund $10,507,704.10 

Water Debt 1,415,717.31 

Consolidated Street Improvement, Loan 

Sinking Funds 763.913.67 

Appropriation and Revenue Fund 1873-4. . .. 556,223.28 

Sunolk-street District Sinking Fund 186,709.22 

Revenue Fund 1,714.67 



Total Redemption Funds $14,329,994.73 



The Debt. 

Total Funded Debt, June 30, 1874 $42,735,785.77 

InorGHSG since 

Burnt District Loan .$1,056,500.00 

Street Improvement Loan . . 493,000.00 

1,549,500.00 



Paid from General Debt Sinking Fund- 
City Debt $367,000.00 

Dorchester Debt. . 15,000.00 
Charlestown Debt 43,320.89 
West Rox. Debt. . . 15,000.00 
Brighton Debt. . . . 49,550.00 

$489,870.89 
Paid from Consolidated Street 

Improvement Fund 43,340.00 

Burnt District Sterling Loan 

Sinking Fund .- 68,572.92 

Revenue funds (city debt). . . . 252,000.00 



$44,285,285.77 



853,783.81 



Gross funded debt Dec. 31, 1874 $43,431,501.96 

Less redemption funds 14,329,994.73 



Net debt Dec. 31, 1874 $29,101,507.23 



PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

By Mr. Stacey of Ward 21— Petition of George 
W. Little, Trustee of Charlestown Poor Fund. 
Referred to Joint Committee on Finance. 

By Mr. Rice of Ward 19 — Petition of Company 
C, Fourth Battalion of Infantry, for approval of 
armoiy on Hancock street, near Upham's Corner, 
Ward 16. Referred to Joint Committee on Armo- 
ries. 

By Mr. Whitmore of Ward 4— Petition of R. D. 
Smith et al., that the passage across King's 
Chapel yard may be opened daily through to 
Court square. Referred to Joint Committee on 

By Mr. Wilbur of Ward 13— Petition of John 
Gilson, that a certificate of city of Boston six 
per cent, stock be delivered to him to replace one 
that was lost. Referred to the Joint Committee 
on Finance. 

Severally sent up. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE. 

Mr. Long of Ward 8 offered an order for the ap- 
pointment of a joint special committee to nomi- 
nate candidate for Commissioner of the Sinking 
Fund. Read twice and passed, and Messrs. Long 
of Ward 8, Kingsley of Ward 3 and Lappen of 
Wa.id 12 appointed. Sent up. 

BADGES,- 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 offered the following: 
Ordered, That be a committee to procure 

suitable badges for the members of the . Common 
Council, the expense thereof not to exceed the 
sum of fifteen dollars each ; the same to be 
charged to the Contingent fund of the Common 
Council. 

Laid on the table on motion of Mr. Flynn of 
Ward 7. 

DORCHESTER BRANCH LIBRARY. 

Mr. Burditt of Ward 16 offered the following: 
Ordered, That the trustees of the Public Libra- 
ry cause to be printed an account of the proceed- 
ings at the recent dedication of the Dorchester 
Branch Library; the expense to be charged to the 
appropriation for Printing. 
Read twice and passed. Sent up. 

NOMINATIONS. 

Reports of nominating committees were sub- 
mitted, as follows: 

By Mr. Noyes of Ward 5 — Recommending the 
election as Trustees of the City Hospital, Hugh 
O'Brien of the Board of Aldermen, and Otis H. 
Pierce and Henry H. Sprague of the Common 
Council. 

By Mr. Wilbur of Ward 13— Recommending the 
reelection of Alvah H. Peters as City Messenger. 

Reports severally accepted and nominations 
laid over. 

PERMITS FOR WOOD BUILDINGS. 

Mr. Cawley of Ward 2, for the Joint Special 
Committee on the Survey and Inspection of Build- 
ings, submitted reports with orders authorizing 



27 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



the granting of permits to C. J. Donovan & Co., 
to erect wooden building on Bartleit place, Ward 
13, and to Smith & Jacobs to erect building for 
storage of lumber on Plympton street, Waid 10. 
Orders read twice and passed. Sent up. 

FINANCE. 

Mr. Peabody of Ward 9 submitted reports from 
the Joint Committee on Finance respectively on 
petition of F. A. Hall and the communication 
from tbe Auditor of Accounts, recommending the 
passage of the following: 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer be and be 
hereby is authorized to pay Francis A. Hall three 
City of Boston gold coupons of $25 each, num- 
bered 2934, 4271 and 5794, alleged to have been 
burned, upon satisfactory evidence of such loss 
being produced by the party claiming payment, 
and on condition that said party shall give a bond 
to the city with sufficient sureties satisfactory to 
the City Solicitor and City Treasurer to indemnify 
it from' all claims in consequence of said payment. 

Ordered, That the Auditor of Accounts be and 
he hereby is authorized to transfer from the ap- 
propriation for Incidental Expenses to thac for 
Contingent Fund of the Common Council the 
sum of $500. 

Severally ordered to a second reading. 

LODGERS AT STATION HOUSES. 

Mr. Sprague of Ward 4 offered the folkraing. : 
Ordered, That that portion of the annual report 
of the Chief of Police relating to lodgers at station 
houses be referred to the Joint Committee on 
Ordinances; and that they be requested to con- 
sider and report whether it is expedient to make 
any changes in the present arrangements for the 
accommodation of transient lodgers, or to provide 
tempora r y employment for such lodgers, so as to 
enable them to compensate the city for the shel- 
ter and food afforded; and if any changes are 
deemed advisable. 
Read twice and passed. Sent up. 

THE USE OF BADGES. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 16 offered the following: 

Ordeied, That the use of badges for the Com- 
mon Council at the expense of the city be and the 
same is hereby dispensed with. 

Mr. Flynn moved to lay rue order on the table. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 16 — I hope the order will 
not be laid on the table. It seems to ine that the 
order offered by the gentleman from Ward 7 is 
nothing but an attempt to filibuster. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7—1 rise to a point of order. 
The gentleman from Ward 16 has no right to state 
what my motives were. 

Mr. Perkins— I ask the gentleman's pardon. 

The motion to lay on the table was declared lost, 
on a rising vote— 28 for, 29 against. 

Mr. Flynn called tor the yeas and nays, that the 
vote might be verified. 

The yeas and nays were ordered, and the motion 
was lost— yeas 29, nays 31. 

Yeas— Messrs. Barry, Bent, Burgess, Clarke, 
Collins, Coyle, Cushman, Devereaux, Edwards, 
Fitzpatrick,' Flynn, Harrigan, Hicks, Kelley, 
Kingsbury, Kingsley, Lippen, Moley, Mooney, 
Murray, Noyes, Osborne, Pierce, Power, Rice, 
Shaw, Walsh, Whitmore, Wilbur— 29. 

Nays— Messrs. Beal, Burditt, Cawley, Curtis, 
Cushing, Day, Fitzgerald, Goldthwait, Guild, 
Hiscock, Howes, Jaques, Kimball, Leighton, 
Long, Loring, Morrison, Newton, Parker, Pea- 
body, Perkins, Sampson, Smith, Sprague, Stacey, 
Sweetser, Thacher, Trull, Wadsworth, Whitcomb, 
Wilicutt— 31. 

Mr. Perkins called for the yeas and nays on the 
passage of the order. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 4— May I inquire the 
meaning of the order? 1 confess that I can at- 
tach no meaning to the words as the order now 
reads. 

Mr. Perkins— The plain and iinple intention of 
the order— it has been very hastily drawn— was to 
settle this question tonight and hereafter for this 
year. The Council have voted substantially to- 
night not to spend money from the city treasury 
for badges. By parliamentary practice an order 
has been introduced here which looks to the de- 
feat of the wish of the majority as expressed here 
tonight. Therefore this order is offered to settle 
this question and to decide that no members shall 
have badges at the expense of the city of Bostyn- 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5— There is a saying some, 
thing like this in Shakspeare: 

"If it were clone, when 't is done, then 't were well 
It were done quickly." 



Now, sir, what is the utility of this order? We 
may pass such an order as this tonight and next 
Thursday evening we can pass an order for sup- 
plying ourselves with badges, and it is perfectly 
competent for us to do so. Did the gentleman 
and his beautiful colleagues, the illustrious trio, 
go into the ante-rooms with the redoubtable mem- 
ber from Ward 7 [Mr. Fitzgerald] to concoct this 
order. Did they go there and bring forth this or- 
der de novo ? or did they do it with malice pre- 
pense? De novo, because it never was thought of 
them before. Brought here because the gentle- 
man from Ward 7 [Mr. Flynn] saw fit to introduce 
an order which had a utility and meant business, 
and they must needs offer an order which means 
nothing but filibustering. Now, sir, I ask, what 
is the utility of this order? Pass an order pro- 
hibiting the use of badges! This Council has 
no badges, and we cannot prohibit that which 
does not exist. My friend must go farther out 
than the Sixteenth Ward to bring- in that. I can 
see flilibustering in it to the greatest extent, 
when I saw the illustrious trio consulting, and 
their ideas put into shape and written down by 
the facile pen of their friend from Ward 16. Then 
what is the use of it? Wnat is the use of spend- 
ing time on it? I hope the Council has got too 
much sense to pass this order, because I can see 
no utility in it. 

Mr. Fitzgerald of Ward 7—1 always like to hear 
the gentleman from Ward 5 talk. He reminds me 
of a little piec 3 of poetry, which runs something 
like this : 

"There was a little man 
And he had a little soul, 

And he said, 'Little soul, let us try, try, try, 
To go beyond your reach, 
And make a little speech, 

Just to please you and I, little soul, 

Just to please you and I,' " 

and nobody else. It was n't Shakspeare who said 
it. It was Tom Moore. The gentleman always re- 
miuds me of that little man when he talks. But,, 
sir, he has chosen to be personal upon an ''illustri- 
ous trio." I don't know who they are, but I assure 
the gentleman that he is rather rash in his charges- 
The gentleman from Ward 16 did n't draft that, 
order at all ; his facile pen did n't do it. That is all 
bosh and nonsense, and the gentleman from 
Ward 5, who is so good at guessing, will have to. 
try again. The object of the order — I should 
not have spoken of the gentleman, but he 
was so complimentary I could not help it 
— was to prevent filibustering on this sub- 
ject being resorted to in the Council. - If an 
order for badges is voted down that will not. 
prevent any member of this Council coming in 
here again with a different order for badges at a 
different price, and I have no doubt the intention 
of the order was to prevent that. If this order is 
passed no badges can be ordered until this order 
is revoked. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7— The gentleman from Ward 
7 knows exactly what the meaning; of the order 
is, because he wrote it and passed it to the gen- 
tleman from Ward 16, so there was a concert of 
action for the purpose of filibustering. In order 
that there may be no more of that this evening, I 
move thac the Council adjourn. 

The motion was lost by a rising vote— 28 for, 31 
against. 

Mr. Fitzgerald of Ward 7—1 move to insert 
after the word "that," at the beginning of the 
order, the word "hereafter." I want to state fur- 
ther that what the p;entleman from Ward 7 states 
is true, that I intend by every parliamentry 
means in my power to prevent the passage of his 
order, and he may call it filibustering. 1 call it 
parliamentary rule. 

Mr. Perkins accepted the amendment, but Mr. 
Flynn objected, and the Chair overruled the ob- 
jection. 

The yeas and nays were ordered on the passage 
of the order. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6—1 desire to say a word 
in explanation of my own opinion upon this mat- 
ter. If I were able to put off all flilibustering and 
put an end to this troublesome question this year, 
I should be glad to vote for the order. But un- 
less it could have that good effect, it seems to me 
proper that we should have a cheap and reason- 
able badge, and I shall feel compelled to vote 
against this order. If it would settle the question 
I would vote for it. I think, however, that it is 
proper to have a cheap badge. 

Mr. Noyes of Ward 5 moved that the whole mat- 
ter be indefinitely postponed and called for the 
yeas and nays, which were ordered. 



JANUARY 28, 1875 



28 



The motion prevailed— yeas 33, nays 29: 
Yeas — Messrs. Barry, Bent, Burgess, Clarke, 
Collins, Coyle, Crocker, Cushman, Damon, Day, 
Devereaux, Duggan, Edwards, Fitzpatrick, Flynn, 
Harrigan, Hicks, Kelley, Kingsbury, Kingsley, 
Lappen, Moley, Mooney, Murray, Noyes, Osborne, 
Power, Rice, Shaw, Walsh, Whitcomb, Whitmore, 
Wilbur— 33. 

Nays— Messrs. Beal, Burditt, Cawley, Curtis, 
Cushing, Fitzgerald , Goldthwait, Guild, Hiscock, 
Howes, Jaques, Kimball, Leighton, Long, Loring, 
Morrison, Newton, Parker, Peabody, Perkins, 
Pierce, Smith, Sprague, Stacey, Sweetser, Thach- 
er, Trail, Wadswortb, Willcutt— 29. 

TWENTY-SECOND OF FEBRUARY. 

Mr. Kingsbury of Ward 15 offered the follow- 
ing: 

Ordered, That his honor the Mayor cause the 
flags to be displayed on the public buildings and 
grounds, salutes to be fired and bells to be rung 
in the city proper, Charlestown, West Koxbury, 
South Boston, Roxbury and Brighton on the 22d 
of February, Washington's Birthday. 

Ordered, to a second reading. 

COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS. 

Mr. Noyes of Ward 5 announced that the Com- 
mittee on Accounts had organized by tlie election 
of James J. Flynn as chairman. 

EAST BOSTON FERRIES. 

Mr. Day of Ward 1 offered the following : 
Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on 
East Boston Ferries be requested to consider and 
report on the expediency of reducing the rates of 
tolls on such ferries. 
Passed and sent up. 

THE CHARTER. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 4 offered the following : 
Ordered, That the Superintendent of Printing, 
under the direction of the committee on that de- 
partment, be instructed to have printed one thou- 
sand copies of the first seventy-five pages of a 
document which was printed for the use of the 
Commission on the Charter entitled "Charter of 
the City of Boston and List of Special Statutes 
now in Force," etc., together with any additions 
which may seem desirable, the said reprint to be 
in the u?ual form of city documents. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6— If I understand that 
order correctly it instructs the printing of that 



number of copies at once. I move its reference to 
the Committee on Printing. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 4— The document to 
which I referred has probably been seen by 
the gentleman from Ward 6. It was pre- 
pared for the commissioners and a very few 
copies were printed. The reason it is desirable 
to have it reprinted is this : We shall 
very soon have tbe question of a new city charter 
under consideration, and there is no document 
which contains all the amendments made by the 
Legislature to the present charter. In 1869 a 
large document with the amendments down to that 
time was printed. Since then all the legislation 
has been printed in the copies of the Laws and Ordi- 
nances, but in the supplement to the ordinances 
this year the laws passed by the State are omitted, 
so that there is no document containing the char- 
ter and the legislation upon it. At the time the 
commission was in session a document was pre- 
pared containing all that legislation, and the order 
I have introduced looks to the printing of it 
in document form. I have named 1000 copies 
because I thought it was a small enough number. 
It contains about seventy-five pages, and may re- 
quire an index. I hardly think it necessary to 
refer it to the Committee on Printing, as the 
Council can understand it as well tonight as they 
can after the reference. 

Mr. Peabody of Ward 9— It is very likely that 
this is a valuable document to put before us. 
I should be glad to vote for the order; but I 
never Lke to be called upon to vote for an order 
after only two or three minutes' consideration. 
One week's delay can do no harm, and it seems to 
me to be quite desirable that it should be referred 
to the Committee on Printing. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 — It seems to me that the 
motion of the gentleman from Ward 6 is eminent- 
ly fitting and proper. I don't think the city wants 
to have it printed. The commissioners have 
brought forth a report which I don't think ten 
men in Boston will ever vote for ; and an enor- 
mous expenditure for this document seems to me 
to be wholly unwise. I hope the Committee on 
Printing, who are competent to judge of that 
matter, will pass upon it and report upon the fea- 
sibility of it. 

The order was referred. Sent down. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 7, the Council 
adjourned. 



29 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceeding's of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY 1, 1875. 



Regular weekly meeting at four o'clock P. M., 
Alderman Clark, Chairman, presiding. 

EXECUTIVE NOMINATIONS CONFIRMED. 

Special Police Officers — Frank E. Jones, Masonic 
Temple; Reuben B. "Wendell, Meridian-street 
Bridge; David Leavitt, Mechanics' Exchange; 
George H. Skinner, Boston & Maine Railroad 
Drawbridge No. 1. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Board. Thomas J. Lane, for leave to occupy a 
new wooden stable for two horses, on Paris street, 
near Marion street. 

Ira E. Fairbanks, for leave to occupy a new 
wooden stable for one horse, on Evans street, 
Ward 16. 

To the Committee on the Treasury Department 
on the part of the Board. Augustus Parker, that 
the mortgage given in 1795 by Ebenezer Seaver to 
the Town Treasurer of Roxbury be cancelled and 
discharged. 

To the Joint Committee on Public Lands. Jo- 
seph Dorr et al., that the boundary line of City- 
whaif lot No. 13 be straightened. 

To the Committee on Common on the part of the 
Board. Jesse U. Jones, for removal of tree at 
corner of Elm and Summer streets, Charlestown. 

To the Joint Committee on Survey and Inspec- 
tion of Buildings. Glover & Jones, for leave to 
erect a wooden building situated on wharf, rear 
of Commercial street and opposite Ellsworth 
street, Ward 16. 

To the Committee on Sewers. Ferdinand Her- 
man, for abatement of sewer assessment on estate 
12 Circuit street; John H.Robinson, for abatement 
of sewer assessment in Brook avenue. 

To the Committee on Lamps. Joseph W. Bart- 
lett, that his method of lighting lamps be applied 
at the south section of the city. 

To the Committee on Paving. M. P. Sias, for 
leave to move a wooden building in East Boston 
from Mayo's wharf, New street, to Orleans street. 

John B.Voisin, John and Martin F. Mulligan, 
Andrew Gallagher and Hiram A. Campbell, for 
compensation for grade damages on Cabot street. 

Metropolitan Railroad Company, for a confirma- 
tion or a re-location of their tracks on Court 
street, between Tremont and Washington streets. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order for Superintendent of Streets to purchase, 
from time to time, horses, hay and other materials 
for the Paving Department. 

Order for Superintendent of Streets to set edge- 
stones when furnished by abutters, and to pay 
one-half the cost of the same. 

Order for Superintendent of Streets to provide 
fences by the side of vacant lots abutting on the 
public streets. 

Order for Superintendent of Streets to number 
or renumber any of the public streets of this city. 

Order for Superintendent of Streets to grant 
permits to open the streets in accordance with 
sections 9 and 10 of the ordinance relating to 
streets. 

Order for Superintendent of Streets to lay cross- 
walks and gutters when deemed expedient by the 
Committee on Paving. 

Order for the Committee on County Buildings to 
provide the necessary furniture from time to 
time for the several county buildings. 

Order for the Commit ee on County Buildings 
to make the necessary repairs on the several court 
houses. 

Order to pay Horace B. Sargent $7197.50, for 
land taken on Shawmut avenue. 

Severally passed. 

Order for the Committee on Ordinances to pro- 
vide the necessary law books for the City Solici- 
tor's office. 

Order for Committee on Public Buildings to 
provide for the necessary repairs and cleaning of 
the several public buildings. 

Order for the City Surveyor to purchase from 
time to time such supplies for his department as 
the committee on said department may approve. 

Order lor Committee on Public Buldings to 
make such repairs on schoolhouses as may be 



deemed expedient by the committee on that de- 
partment. 
Severally passed and sent down. 

REDIVISION OF THE WARDS. 

The order for the Mayor to petition the Legisla- 
ture for authority to divide this city into wards, 
not exceeding thirty in number, with a represent- 
ation of two Common Councilmen and two School 
Committee from each ward, and also to establish 
not exceeding three voting precincts in each 
ward, was considered under the head of unfin- 
ished business. 

Alderman Quincy— I suppose some little expla- 
nation will be desired by the Board of the 
reasons which induced the committee to re- 
port this order. The legal position of the 
matter at present is this: Cities are now 
allowed by law in every census year to re- 
divide their territory into as many wards 
• as they see fit, not exceeding the number to 
which they are limited by their charters. Our 
charter first provided for twelve, then for not ex- 
ceeding fifteen and sixteen successively, ;!iid then, 
without in terms further extending the limit to 
which the city should be entitled, certain annexed 
districts were declared to constitute additional 
wards under certain numbers. So that by the 
failure of Brookline to come in we have now 
twenty-one wards, one of which is by act of the 
Legislature numbered twenty- two. In this state 
of things it is evident that some legislation is 
requisite to fix clearly the charter limit, beyond 
which in the re-division we may not go. That our 
present number of twenty-one should be some- 
what increased seems a pretty general conviction, 
though upon the point of where the limit should 
be placed opinions differ— some considering twen- 
ty-two or twenty-four to be enough; others, who 
for various reasons believe in much smaller wards 
than we have now, have suggested twenty-six, 
twenty-eight or even thirty. It seemed, then, to the 
committee that the first step to which it was suppos- 
ed no objection would be made was to ask the Legis- 
lature to so alter our charter that we may decide 
unon what number we choose under thirty. This 
simply fixes a limit within which the question of 
increase or diminution is left open. And this was 
at first, in the opinion of the chairman, all that 
this committee en the redivision should now 
recommend. Granting that it will be within the 
province of the special committee on redivision of 
wards to deal also with the question of represent- 
ation and the size of the coordinate branches, it 
would have been time enough to',pffer recommend- 
ations on that point in connection with the defi- 
nite number under thirty when agreed upon. 
Then the question must come up, because as the 
present charter stands each ward after redivision 
will become entitled to a representation of four 
and six in Council and School Committee respec- 
tively, greatly increasing the size of both, and the 
committee could hardly recommend any particular 
number of wards without at least stating the basis 
of representation which they had in view, whether 
that of the present charter or a change. And 
it is evident that this committee must act entirely 
irrespective of the chances of the new charter. 
For a redivision of wards being admitted to be 
now imperative we are brought face to face with 
the question of an increased or diminished Coun- 
cil and School Committee, and this is a question 
which a majority of the committee w ere in favor 
of now bringing forward. If the Board should 
think it well that it should now be discussed I 
should favor the passage of this order for which 
I voted as against one contemplating a less num- 
ber of wards and no diminution of the present 
numbers of the two representative bodies. But if 
the Board should be of opinion either that we 
shall have more light by which to discuss the mat- 
ter at a later period, which is certainly my opin- 
ion, or that it would be well to allow the ooher 
branch to take the initiative in amatter particular- 
ly affectingtheui,then Icertainly should not oppose 
an amendment striking out of the order so much as 
bears upon the representation of the redivided 
wards. Then the granting of this power by the 
Legislature binds us to nothing, but simply per- 
mits us to decide upon any nuu.ber up to and in- 
cluding thirty. In other words, the situation is 
simply this -charter or no charter, the census is 
to be taken, and the opportunity for a redivision 
in accordance therewith will not return for ten 
years. If it is desirable to redivide, is it not also 
desirable to be empowered to increase, if we 
choose, the present number of wrrds? If so, the 
sooner we ask for and obtain that power the bet- 
ter. 



FEBRUARY 1, 1875. 



30 



Alderman Power — I suppose that there will have 
to be a redivision of the wards, but I think, as the 
gentleman has just remarked, that at present we 
should not meddle with the question as to how 
many representatives in the Common Council 
should come from each ward, and I move to 
amend by striking out the words "and providing 
that each ward shall be entitled to two renresent- 
atives in the Common Council and two in the 
School Comjnittee," so that this order will only 
ask for authority for a redivision of the wards, 
aDd to establish three voting precincts in each 
ward if that is desirable. 

Alderman Worthington — It seems to me that we 
are anticipating by this order what it is possible 
may be done by the new city charter. I think we 
are making haste when due courtesy should lead 
us to wait for the reportof the committee to whom 
the new charter has been referred. If the new char- 
ter is going to be adopted by the City Government, 
that I think will give all the committee are asking 
for now. The order might lie over for a week or 
two until we see what is to be the fate of the new 
charter. I therefore move that the matter be laid 
on the table, that we may have further time t« 
consider it and learn what is to be done with the 
new charter. 

The motion prevailed. 

THE LAW DEPARTMENT. 

The ordinance to amend ordinance relating to 
the Law Department so as to provide for the ap- 
pointment of a "Fourth Assistant Solicitor," and 
in cases of emergency for the Mayor to employ, 
with the approval of the Committee ou Claims, 
extra assistants, (City Doc. No. 18), was consid- 
ered under the head of unfinished business. 

Alderman Power — I agreed with the gentleman 
last up ih regard to the disposition of the pre- 
vious order, and it must be apparent that the 
same reason which he urged for laying that mat- 
ter upon the table will apply to this one. I therc- 
foie move that, this order lie upon the table. 

Alderman Quincy — I ratber hope that this mat- 
ter will not be laid upon the table, for — 

The Chairman—The motion is not debatable. 

Alderman Worthington — I hope the Alderman 
from Ward 12 will withdraw that motion, for I 
think good and sufficient reasons can toe gipen 
why this ordinance should pass at this time, and 
that he will learn that there is absolute necessity 
for more assistance in the Law Department at 
this time. 

On motion of Alderman Power, unanimous con- 
sent was given Alderman Quincy to speak. 

Alderman Quincy — This ordinance was reported 
not merely as unfinished business of last year, But 
upon the reference of so much of the Mayor's ad- 
dress as related to the addition to the Law De- 
partment. [The Alderman read the section of the 
Mayor's address alluded to.] The City Solicitor 
appeared and stated the neces>ities of the case to 
the committee. Statistics could have been pro- 
cured by the committee of the amount of business, 
the number of cases and their nature, the number 
and localities of the var'ous courts in which the 
City Solicitor's office has to be represented, the 
amount of business behindhand, and the danger 
of allowing it to continue so, if they had consid- 
ered it necessary. But they did not; they 
thought it would be enough to assure the 
Board that upon personal investigation the 
committee concurred with his Honor the 
Mayor in the opinion that the City Solicitor's 
office is short-handed in its regular work. This 
being the case, it seemed to the committee a 
measure of direct economy to give the City So- 
licitor the assistance which he asks for, because it 
is very evident that by reason of the department 
bei ig short-handed, and allowing cases to go by 
default in the courts, the amount of money lost 
might be more in one day than the salary of the 
assistant would amount to in a year. The ordi- 
nance as first reported provided for the employ- 
ment of counsel at the State House during the 
sessions of the Legislature, and that was stricken 
out after reasons were tiven by the Alderman 
from Ward 9, and I do not think' any one desires 
that i f should be restored. If it is asked why an- 
other assistant should be appointed, when addi- 
tional assistance is provided far in section 2, the 
answer is, because the business of the City So- 
licitor's office is behindhand. I think we should 
look after the city's business the same as a busi- 
ness man would the affairs of his firm. Any other 
policy would be penny wise and pound foolish. 
Then it has been asked what section 2 is for. 

"Sect. 2. Whenever in the opinion of the 



Mayor such an emergency arises as to require 
that additional assistance should be furnished in 
the Law Department, the Mayor may, with the 
approval of the Committee on Claims, provide 
sued assistance for the time being as he may deem 
expedient; and the compensation therefor shall 
be established by the Committee on Claims." 

There probably will be cases in court, in which 
the city is defendant, in which the Law Depart- 
ment is in direct communication with the Com- 
mittee on Claims— cases, the merits of which 
are more likely to be known to that commit- 
tee than to any other — and iu such cases 
the approval was given to the Commit- 
tee on Claims. The reason for giving 
the approval of the appointment of the perma- 
nent a sistant to the Committee on Ordinances 
was because chat committee usually contains 
more lawyer^ than any other, and they would be 
more competent to judge of the qualifications of 
the officer. But this temporary assistance is re- 
quired mostly for cases coming from the Commit- 
tee on Claims. There might be a case where it 
was necessary to employ an expert, as, for in- 
stance, in a matter of water damages, where it 
might be for the city's interest to employ some 
lawyer who bad made that his business, and who 
was'an expert in that particular branch of the 
law. It seems to me that if we look after the 
city's interest as we would after our own, this as- 
sistance which the City Solicitor asks for should 
be gr mted at once. 

Alderman Power [unanimous consent to sneak 
being given] — The members of the old Board are 
of course familiar with the objections raised to 
the passage of this ordinance in the Government 
of last year, and I would not desire to say any- 
thing on the subject, only that the new members 
may, perhaps, not be familiar with the reasons 
given at that time. I will acknowledge, to begin 
with, that in the past, perhaps, this Law Depart- 
ment has been overworked, and that in the past 
year extra assistance might have beer, needed; 
but such an emergency is not likely to come in 
the future. The Board must see that the particular 
reason why the Law Department was overworked 
was in consequence of tne fact that in 
the "burnt district" whenever an estate was 
taken in widening streets and making 
improvements, an immense amount of work for 
this department was made in the searching of 
records for titles. The same was the case in the 
taking and raising of the Church and Suffolk 
street territories. Now, that is about all finished. 
The gentleman has referied to a business man 
seeing to the interest of his firm ; the business 
men that I know at present are dispensing with 
some of the help that they have, because their 
business will not warrant them in keeping them. 
It is precisely the same thing in the case of the 
Law Department. I suppose that every gentle- 
man here is aware that we have got to curtail the 
expenses of this city and retrench in every way 
we can. Consequently there is no prospect of our 
going into any more of those large and expensive 
improvements as we have in the past, and there- 
fore the assistance needed in the Law Department 
must be less in the future than it has been in 
times past. Gentlemen must think of the im- 
mense amount of w r ork that the "burnt district" 
and the Church-street district have made. All 
that is nearly completed, and there is no need of 
more assistance on that account. In regard to 
the second section, the Cominitiee on Claims have 
always had authority to get extra assistance when 
they dewned it necessary. Now, in regard to the 
work brought by annexation : The City So- 
licitor has been employing the counsel first 
engaged by those towns, and they have at- 
tended to the cases since those places were an- 
nexed. I should be as anxious— I am as anxious 
as any one— that the cit\'s interest should be 
looked after carefully, as any gentleman here. 
If I thought there is' going to be the need of 
assistance in the future, that there has been in 
the past, I should not hesitate to indorse this 
ordinance. I cannot see it, however, and I think 
it must be less and less in the coming years. 
Then there is in the new city charter a complete 
remodelling of this Law Department, as has 
been suggested, and, as I said before, the same 
reasons which apply to the order for the revision 
of the wards, applies to this ordnance; and I 
think it should be laid upon the table until we see 
what disposition is to be made of the new charter, 
then we can put it in the best possible shape that 
it can be. The department is alluded to in the 
new charter, and rules are laid down for it. 



31 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



For that reason I think it should be laid upon the 
table. 

At the suggestion of the Chairman, Alderman 
Power withdrew the motion to lay on the table, to 
allow discussion. 

Alderman Prescntt — This matter was very fully 
discussed at two meetings of tbe last Board of 
Aldermen, and the ordinance as now presented is 
substantially the same as was passed by this 
Board after a very full and free consideration of 
the subject. It went to the other branch of the 
Government on the closing session of the year. 
If they had had time to investigate the subject, I 
have no doubt it would have been passed. In- 
stead of that they referred it to the next City 
Government. I trust this mattei will be taken 
hold of and acted upon without delay. 
It is true that the new city charter makes 
provision for the Law Department of the City of 
Boston; but even if the charter is adopted it can- 
not go into effect for a year. What is intended 
to be provided for in this ordinance is an emer- 
gency for the present year. The legal department 
of the City of Boston is unquestionably overbur- 
dened. Any gentleman, after a very few minutes' 
conversation with the City Solicitor, will make 
up his mind that it is so. The City Solicitor has 
not come to us and made complaint. Members of 
tbe City Government who know anything: of the 
business of that department know that we are 
requiring mere of them than we have any right to 
ask. The department has been increased but once 
since 1868, by a salary of $2000. The Alderman 
from Ward 12 seems to think that tlie business of 
that department will decrease during the present 
year. Sow, it seems lo me that the person who is 
most capable of judging in regard to that is the 
City Solicitor himself, and he has distinctly 
stated that there is no probability of a dimi- 
nution of tbe business in that office. On the 
contrary there is a continual increase from 
very many causes. The establishment of the 
Board of ' Health, the Board of Registration 
of Voters, and other boards, has brought 
many cases into the City Solicitor's office. Besides 
that, in times like these, when the rate of taxa- 
tion is high, many cases are brought before the 
City Solicitor by counsel for parties endeavoring 
to get an abatement of their taxes. Besides that, 
tne establishment ot the local courts in various 
sections of th' city, a large number of small cases 
have to be attended to from the City Solicitor's 
office. I believe that the salaries for this depart- 
ment are only $16,000 a year, or one-five-hundredth 
part of one per cent, of the valuation of the city. 

Alderman Power renewed the motion to lay on 
the table, and it was lost. 

The ordinance was then passed and sent down. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL FOE CON- 
CURRENCE. 

Petitions of trustees of Charlestown Poor Fund, 
Company C, Fourth Battalion of Infantry, R. D. 
Smith et al. and John Gilson, referred. 

Order for a special committee (Messrs. Long, 
Kingslev and Lappen to be joined) to nominate a 
Commissioner on the Sinking Funds. Passed, 
and Aldermen Power and Burrage appointed. 

Order to print the proceedings at the dedication 
of the Dorchester Branch Library. 

Order for the Committee on East Boston Ferries 
to consider the expediency of reducing ferry tolls. 

Order to refer to Committee on Ordinances that 
portion of the annual report of the Chief of Police 
which relates to station-house lodgers. 

Severally passed. , 

Annual report of the Commissioners on the 
Sinking Funds (City Doc. No. 15.) Placed on 
file. 

Reports and orders for permits to allow C. J. 
Donovan & Co. to erect a wooden building on 
Bartlett place; and Smith & Jacobs to erect a 
lumber shed on Plympton street. Orders passed. 

An order to print 1000 copies of the first seventy- 
five pages of a document, prepared for the com- 
mission on the charter, entitled "Charter of the 
City of Boston and Special Statute • now in Force," 
earhe un, referred to the Committee on Printing. 
Concurred. 

ELECTIONS. 

The following elections occurred: 

City Messenger. Report nominating Alvah EC. 
Peters. Accepted in concurrence. Aldermen 
Power and Quincy were appointed a committee to 
collect and count votes. They reported that Al- 
vah H. Peters had received 12 votes, the whole 
number cast, and he was declared elected. Cer- 
tificate sent down. 



Trustees of Public Library. Aldermen Steb" 
bins and Prescott were appointed a committee to 
collect and count votes. They reported that Al- 
derman John T. Clark had received 11 of the 12 
votes cast, and Councilmen C. A. Burditt and 
David P. Kimball had 12 each. They were declar- 
ed elected in concurrence. 

Directors of Public Institutions. Aldermen 
O'Brien and Viles were appointed a committee to 
collect and count votes. They reported as fol- 
lows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Alderman James Power 11 

Alderman Samuel M. Quincy 1 

Councilman Cyrus A. Page 12 

Councilman William C. Burgess 3 

Councilman William G. Train 9 

Alderman Power and Councilman Page were 
declared elected in concurrence, and Councilman 
Train was declared elected in non-concurrence. 
Certificate sent down. 

Member of Cochituate Water Board. Aldermen 
Pope and Bigelow were appointed a committee to 
collect and count votes. They reported — 

Whole number of votes 62 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Councilman Amos L. Noyes 2 

Councilman Uriel H.Crocker 10 

Mr. Crocker was declared elected in non-concur- 
rence. Certificate sent down. 

Trustees of City Hospital. Aldermen Harris 
and Worthington were appointed a committee to 
collect and count votes. They reported as fol- 
lows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary toachoiee 7 

Alderman Hugh O'Brien had 11 

Alderman James Power 1 

Councilman otis H. Pierce 12 

Councilman Henry H. Sprague 12 

Alderman O'Brien and Councilmen Pierce and 
Sprague were declared elected. Certificate sent 
down. 

Assessors. Aldermen Harris and Worthington 
were appointed a committee to collect and count 
votes. They reported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 11 

Necessary to a choice 6 

Thomas Hills 11 

Benjamin dishing 11 

Horace Smith 10 

Thomas J. Bancroft 10 

Benjamin F. Palmer 11 

and they were declared elected. Certificate sent 
down. 

Clerk of Committees. Aldermen Stebbins and 
Prescott were appointed a committee to collect 
and count votes. They reported that James M. 
Bugbee had received twelve votes, tne whole 
number cast, and he was declared elected. Cer- 
tificate sent down. 

COMMUNICATIONS FROM CITY OFFICERS. 

Superintendent of Market. Report for auarter 
ending Jan. 31. Receipts, $27,253.81, of "which 
$446.87 were for the India-wharf market. Placed 
on file. 

Superintendent of Sewers. Schedules of cost of 
constructing sewers in New Washington street, 
$517.92; Fairfield street, $4909.57; Allston and 
Bulfinch streets, $284 55. Severally referred to 
Committee on Sewers. 

ORDER OF NOTICE ON PETITION. 

A petition was received from H. F. Wheeler for 
leave to erect and use a steam engine of fifteen- 
horse power at 71 Lincoln street, and an order was 
passed for a bearing thereon, to all parties ob- 
jecting, on Tuesday, Feb. 23. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF 
SEWERS. 

The annual report of the Superintendent of 
Sewers [City Document No. 17], was received and 
sei.t down. 

The following amount of sewerage has been 
constructed during the year: City proper, 4561 
feet, $18,337.88; South Boston, 5005 feet, $28,600.34; 
Fast Boston, 4913 feet, £11,965.35; Roxburv, 19,517 
feet, $122,496.68 ; Dorchester, 5527 feet, $12,032.54; 
Charlestown, 1347 feet, $3894.37; miscellaneous 
expenses, $35,505.47. Total, 40,870 feet, or 7% 
miles, $232,832.63. By annexation there were re- 
ceived from Charlestown about 13V 2 miles and 
from West Roxbury and Brighton about 1000 feet, 
making the total present length of sewers of 
the whole city about 153 miles. There has been 
assessed upon estates benefited the sum of $55,- 



FEBRUARY 



187 5 



32 



■030.58; the Treasurer has collected during the year 
assessments amounting to $103,481.21 ; the Su- 
perintendent has collected and paid into the 
trea-ury from entrance fees, wharfage, use of 
tools, etc., $2313.57. Total collections, $105,794.78. 
During the year 4167 permits have been given to 
construct or repair drains; about 2500 of these be- 
ing in consequ nee of the order of notice circu- 
lated by the police in relation to conductors ; 133 
manhole covers have been renewed with iron ; 335 
manholes cleaned, containing 297 loads of sewage 
matter. In Roxuury the sewer for the valley of 
Stony' Brook has been built as far as Old Heath 
street, and will be extended to Green street, Ja- 
maica Plain, the coming season, it possible. A 
long branch has also been built in Amory 
street, so as to give drainage to the territory 
about School street, and Shawmut avenue at 
the earliest moment, the Board of Health having 
called urgent attention to it. Some $50,000 this 
year and $100,000 next will be spent on accouut of 
this trunk line, &nd the remarks below upon the 
subject of assessments have reference to this 
sewer as an example. At the last session of the 
Legislature an act was obtained permitting the 
city to lower and straighten the channel of Stony 
Brook in order to thoioughly drain the swamps 
ana meadows along its course, but not to use it 
for sewerage purposes. The town of West Rox- 
bury had, under a previous act, tauen all the land 
necessary for this purpose within its limits, but 
nothing has yet been done by the city of Boston, 
except to settle some claims for such takings. 
In view of the rapid increase of buildings 
along the valley of the brook in Roxbnry, it is 
certainly economical to take the land for a new 
channel, aod hold it against occupation, in order 
to diminish the amount of damages to be finally 
paid. The whole line through West Boxbury, 
which has been taken and mostly paid for, should 
be taken possession of, and the lines of the new 
•channel denned during the year 1875. The deep- 
ening of this brook, when carried out, will add 
at once to the value of a great deal of land, from 
"which betterments can be collected, and will un- 
doubtedly be of advantage to the general health. 
The Superintendent suggests that an effort be 
made to obtain from the Legislature such 
amendment to the general statutes as will per- 
mit the charge of a fixed rate per square foot of 
land abutting on a sewer, as the estimate of the 
benefit derived from its construction ; and that 
this rate be fixed by averaging the cost of sewers 
already built upon the number of square feet of 
land drained by them, and so obtain a general 
uniform rate for the whole city; or by estimating, 
iu advance, the cost of building all the sewers in 
a certain district, and assessing upon the land as 
fast as sewered, not its proportion of the part op- 
posite itself, but its proportion as if tha whole had 
been built at once; establishing thus a uniform 
rate for each drainage district. 

FEES OF DEPUTY COLLECTORS. 

Alderman Bigelow, for the Joiut Standing Com- 
mittee on the Tiea^ury Department, who were di- 
rected to make an examination of the records 
and accounts in the office of the City and County 
Treasurer and Collector, submitted a report, in 
part, recommendiug the passage of the accompa- 
nying order : 

Ordered, That his honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to petition the General Court now in session, 
for the passage of an act authorizing the City 
Council to establish the salaries of the Collector 
and Deputy Collectors of taxes in the city of Bos- 
ton, and providing that all fees now payable to 
such officers under the statutes shall thereafter be 
paid into the city treasury. 

Read once. 

THE FRANKLIN FUND. 

AMerman Bigelow submitted a report from the 
committee appointed to examine the accounts of 
the late treasurer of the Franklin Fund, that said 
accounts, so far as they had been made up, and 
the securities of said fund.were found to be correct. 
Since that examination the accounts have been 
completed by the present Tieasuier and made 
up to January of the present year, and 
they have been / again examined by the com- 
mittee, Who found that the same were correct- 
ly recoided, and that the following is the exhibit 
of the character of the fund iu the hands of the 
present treasurer at tl.is date: 

Amount of fund Jan. i, 1874, was $182,278.63 

Interest accrued , 11,705.96 



$193,984.59 



This fund is invested as follows : 

Deposit in Massachusetts Hospital Life Insur- 
ance Office $192,278.65 

Provident Institution for Savings 359.70 

Suffolk Savings Bank 355.64 

Four bondstf or loans 990.00 

Cash .60 

$193,984.59 

Accepted. 

ASSESSORS' DEPARTMENT. 

Alderman Harris, for the Joint Committee on 
Assessors' Department, submitted reports as fol- 
lows : 

Report recommending leave to withdraw on 
the following petitions: E.S.Johnson, that the 
tax paid by him in 1874 upon certain real estate 
taken for extension of East Lenox street be re- 
funded; James F. Farley, administrator of estate 
of Patrick Harkins, that the taxes assessed in 1870 
upon estate of said Harkins be refunded. Sever- 
ally accepted and sent down. 

Report, in compliance with the ordinance, rec- 
ommending the election of the following- named 
persons as First Assistant Assessors, viz. : 
William J. Ellis, L. Foster Morse, 

John Noble, George F. Davis 

Michael Carney, Andrew J. Browne, 

George D. Ricker, George A. Comins, 

Charles F. McDavitt, Phineas B. Smith, 
Roger H. Scan uell, William Withington, 

Horace Loring, Henry Pierce, 

P. Ambrose Young, John Pierce, 

William H. Cuudy, Gideon Walker, 

Edward F. Robinson, Henry W. Dickerman, 
Theoplrlus Burr, George H. Williams, 

George F.Williams, Joshua S. Duncklee, 

Otis Rich, William B. Long, 

Joseph R. Grose, Nahum Chapin, 

Edwin B. Spinney, George S. Pendergast, 

Joseph L. Drew, Thomas L. Jenks, 

JohnH. Giblin. 

Report accepted and nominations laid. over. 

Report on petition of H. W. Pickering, execu- 
tor, for the remission of taxes, recommending the 
passage of the accompanying order, the estate 
named having been wholly distributed by the 
executor previous to the 15th day of December, 
1873: 

Ordered, That the tax, amounting to $209.04, 
assessed in 1874 upon, Henry W. Pickering, as 
executor of the estate of Caroline Newman, to- 
gether with the interest and costs thereon, be and 
the same is hereby remitted. 

Read once. 

Report on request of Overseers of the Poor in 
relation to property released to the city by heirs 
of David Sears, recommending the passage of the 
accompanying order: 

Ordered, That the tax, amounting to $1018.68, 
assessed for the year 1874 upon certain real estate 
devised to the city by David Sears, and fully re- 
leased by his heirs on the first day of May, 1874, 
be assumed by the city and paid from the appro- 
priation tor Incidentals. 

Read' once. 

Report, on petition of D. Banks McKenzie, for 
remission of tax assessed on Appleton Temporary 
Home, that the City Council has no authority to 
grant the prayer of the petitioner, as the institu- 
tion is not incorporated, and it does not own the 
estate which it occupies. Accepted and sent 
down. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Bigelow, for the Committee on Li- 
censes, submitted reports as follows: 

Report recommending leave to withdraw on pe- 
tition of John U; Stiles for change of omnibus 
route. On motion of Alderman Bigelow the report 
was (.specially assigned to next Monday at five 
o'clock in the afternoon, when a hearing will be 
given the petitioner. 

Minors' Applications Granted— Seventeen news- 
boys. 

Auctioneers Licensed— Cooper & Kelso, 154 Main 
st>eet,Charlestown; Irving & Pressey, 1033 Wash- 
ington street. 

Amusement Licences Granted — Young Men's 
Sodality, to give dramatic entertainments at In- 
stitute Hall, Endicott street, Feb. 2 and 3; Eliot 
Dramatic Association, to give entertainment at 
1179 Washington street, Feb. 9. 

License to Manufacture Spirituous Liquors 
Granted— Felton & Stone, 63 C street. 

Pawnbroker Licensed— (ieorge W. Thym,9 Hay- 
ward place. 

Victuallers' Licenses Granted— James Pearce, 



33 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



corner H and;Eighth streets ; Ramsell Brothers, 93 
Pleasant street; Henry Splaine, 221 Hanover 
street; Tulip King, 52 Phillips street; F. li. Lewis 
& Co., 4 Main street, Charlestown. 

Innbolder's License Granted- Martin J. Hans- 
com, Charles River Hotel, Brighton. 

iLnholder's License Refused — J. B. Sullivan, 111 
Essex street, coiner Kingston. 

Victuallers' Licenses Refused — G. G. Batchel- 
der, 11 Harvard sireet; James O. Neil, Jr., 65 
South street. 

Severally accepted. 

SEWERS. 

Alderman Harris, for the Committee on bewers, 
submitted the following: 

Ordered, That $106.37 be abated from Charles 
B. Wilson for a sewer in Dennis-street, and the 
same amount be assessed upon Francis Creber; 
also, that $24.61 be abated from Honora T. Allen 
for a sewer in Oneida-street, and the same amount 
assessed upon W. W. Drotney; also, that 
§13.50 be abated from David Gore for a sewer 
in Magazinetstreet, and the same amount as- 
sessed upon Richard Williams; also, that $96.94 
be abated from Frederick H. Stimpson for 
a sewer in Harrison avenue, and the 
same amount assessed upon William P. Kuhn, 
trustee; also, that $83.44 be abated from George 
A. Ellis for a sewer in Putnam street on account 
of previous assessment; also, that the payment ot 
$55.74 assessed upon A. T. Stearns foi a sewer in 
Walnut t-treet be postpones till entry; also, that 
$33.81 be abated from Charles S. Hildveth for a 
sewer in Emerson street, and the same amount 
assessed on John Butland; also, that $34.02 be 
abated from William P. Hunt for a sewer in 
Eighth street, and the same amount assessed up- 
on Joaquin K. Souther. 

Read twice and passed. 

Whereas, By deed of the Boston Water Power 
Company to its grantees between Beacon street 
and Commonwealth avenue, andbetween Glouces- 
ter and Exeter streets, the said company reserved 
the right to itself and its assigns to build sewers 
in the passageways, and to assess upon each lot 
one-half the cost of the sewer opposite said lot; 
and 

Whereas, By agreement dated May 23, 1874, in 
consideration of the completion ot Fairfield-street 
sewer by the city of Boston, said Water Power 
Company assigned to said^city all its right to col- 
lect the aforesaid sewer assessments : is is there- 
fore 

Ordered, That the amounts set opposite the re- 
spective names in the following schedule, being 
the assessment of the cost of the passageway 
sewers as above described, be and the same are 
herely assessed upon the persons named, and the 
Treasurer is herebykdirected to collect the amounts 
according to law. [Tne schedule above mentioned 
is appended to the order.] 

Read twice and passed. 

SUPERINTENDENTS OF BRIDGES. 

Alderman Power offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Committee on Bridges be 
requested to nominate superintendents of such 
bridges as are partially controlled by the city. 

PAVING REPORTS AND ORDERS. 

Alderman Power, for the Committee on Paving, 
submitted reports and orders as follows: 

Report recommending the adoption of the fol- 
lowirjg "Rules to regulate the moving of build- 
ings through the streets of the city of Boston" : 

1. All applications for moving buildings 
through the streets of this city shall be made to 
the Board of Aldermen and referred to a commit- 
tee for consideration and report. 

2. All applications shall state the location 
of the building proposed to be moved, its length, 
width, height and the principal material of its 
exterior sides and roof; and shall definitely de- 
scribe the route over which it is to be moved, and 
the length of time required to move the same. 

3. All applications sh^ll be accompanied by 
the written consent of the L spector of Build- 
ings to place the building on the lot proposed; 
also by the written consent of all railroad corpo- 
rations whose tracks are to be crossed or encum- 
bered by the moving of the building. 

4. Permits [shall be granted only to prac- 
tical building movers, who are known to he en- 
gaged in the business. 

5. Before a permit is issued the building 
mover shall file with the City Clerk a bond in the 
sum of not less than $1000, with two or more sure- 



ties (one of whom shall be the owner of the build- 
ing), to save harmless and indemnify the city 
from all damages which may be causedto persons 
or nropertv by reason of the moving of the build- 
ing. 

6. The consent of the Board of Aldermen shall 
be obtained before any shade trees are removed or 
the branches thereof cut or trimmed. 

7. The written consent of the Board of Fire 
Commissioneis shall be ohtained before any 
fire-alarm telegraph wires are cut or removed. 

8. The wiitten consent of the Superintendent 
of Lamps must be obtained before any lamps or 
lamp posts are removed. 

The rules were adopted. 

Report recommending that a permit be grant- 
ed, on the usual conHitions, to M. Ellis & Co., to. 
move a wooden building from Front street to 
Dorrance street, Charlestown. 

Accepted. 

Ordered, That the Board establish the grade of 
Culvert street between Treinout and Cabot streets, 
as shown on a plan and piofile drawn-by the City 
Surveyor, dated Jan. 13, 1875, and deposited in the 
office of said City Pvuveyor. 

Read once. 

Ordered, That the Board establish the grade of 
Knowlton street between Telegraph and East 
Eighth streets, as shown on a plan and profile- 
drawn by the City Surveyor, dated Jan. 15, 1875,, 
and deposited in the office of said City Surveyor. 

Reaa once. 

Ordered, That notice be given to the owners and 
abutters on Tremont street, Ward 19, to set back 
the fences in front of their respective estates on 
said street to the lines established by the County 
Commissioueis of Middlesex County July 25, 1861, 
and.shown on apian drawn by Marshall S.Rice of 
Newton. And in default of. said work being done 
by the first day of April, 1875, the Superintendent 
of Streets is hereby directed to set back said 
fences to said lines at the expense of the owners 
of said estates. 

Read twice and passed. 

Ordered, Thai notice be given to the owners or 
agents of estates numbered 37 to 41 Hudson street 
to strengthen and support the covering to the 
areas under the sidewalks in front of said estates 
in a manner satisfactory to the Supeiintendent of 
Streets, so that the same shall be safe for public 
travel; and in default of said work being done 
within thirty days the Superintendent of Streets 
is hereby directet? to cause said are s to be filled 
up and made solid, at the expense of the owners 
of said estates. 

Read twice and passed. 

Order for proportionate assessment and collec- 
tion of cost of edgestones and sidewalks on 
Princeton street, between Prescott street and 
Eaale square, as per schedule submitted by Su- 
perintendent of Streets. Read twice and passed. 

STREETS. 

Aldermsji Harris, for the Committee on Streets 
on the part of the Uoard, submitted orders as; 
follows: 

Orders to pay for land taken and damages occa- 
sioned by the widening of sti eets — National Bank 
of Brighton, $272.25, extension of Chestnut Hill 
avenue to Washington street in Brighton, in 1871 ; 
T. J. Dunbar, $246, widening of Shawmut avenue, 
now Washington street. Severally read twice 
and passed. 

Ordered, That all matters of an unfinished na- 
ture relating to the improvements on the Fort 
Hill territory, be referred to the Committee on 
Streets of the Board of Aldermen, with authority 
to exercise all the powers which were held by the 
special committee of the Board of Aldermen on 
Fort Hill, for the year 1874. 

Read twice and passed. 

Ordered, That whenever the Committee on 
Streets of this Board deem it for the best interest 
of the city to refer claims for damages or better 
ments relating to the laying out or widening of 
streets to arbitration for settlement, the said com- 
mittee is hereby authorized to refer such claims, 
with the approval of his Honor the Mayor and 
the City Solicitor. 

Read twice and passed. 

Order givingnotice to the heirs of Ruel Baker, 
Mary Bourne, Rebecca Lynch, G. F. Friese, C. 
Weber, Elizabeth S. Crispin, William H. Quigley, 
Boston Young Women's Christian Association, 
the city of Boston, and all others in interest, "to 
quit" on Beach street as widened by the Street 
Commissioners June 15, 1874, on or before 
the first day of May next ensuing, otherwise the 



FEBRUARY 1 , 1875 



34 



Committee on Streets are directed to cause the 
removal of all obstructions thereon. 
Passed. 

ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT. 

Alderman Bigelow offered the following : 
Ordered, That the City Engineer be authorized, 
■with the approval of the Joint Standing Commit- 
tee on the Engineer's Department, to make such 
purchases of supplies, instruments, drawing ma- 
terials and furniture, and to incur such other ex- 
penses as may be necessary for his department 
during the present municipal year. 
Read twice and passed. 

ADDITIONAL WATER SUPPLY. 

The Chairman submitted the following : 
The Committee on Finance, to whom was re- 
ferred the report of the Committee on Water, cov- 
ering a request of the Cochituate Water Board 
for an additional appropriation of $1,500,000, to be 
expended in building a new coi-duit and construct- 
ing storage basins on the Sudbury River; also 
$30,000 for a siphon pipe across Charles River, 
with the recommendation of said committee in 
favor ot granting f ,be request, would respectfully 
ask for the passage of the accompanying orders. 
For the Committee. 
Samuel C. Cobb, Chairman. 
Ordered, That the City Treasurerbe and he here- 
by is authorized to borrow, under the direction of 
the Committee on Finance, the sum of $1,500,000, 
to be added to the appropriation for "Additional 
Supply cf Water." And the Cochituate Water 
Board, in addition to the poweis heietofore grant- 
ed said board by the City Council, be and. it is 
hereby authorized to take, by nurchase or other- 
wise, ianas and real estate necessary for building 
an aqueduct between Farm Pond and Cnestnut 
Bill Reservoir, and to construct such aque- 
duct, and to do all other acts authorized 
to be done by an act of the Legisla- 
ture entitled "An act to authorize the city 
of Boston to obtain an additional supply of pure 
water," given in chapter 177 of the acts of 1872, 
necessaiy for storing and purifying and bringing 
to Chestnut Hill Reservoir the waters cf Sudbury 
River; provided, however, that the doing of all 
work and the furnishing of all materials for any 
portion of the work, the cost of which is estimat- 
ed to exceed $10,000, with the exception of such 
portions of the aqueduct as pass under railroad 
tracks (which mny be built by days' labor or by 
contract, according as the said Cochituate V'ater 
Board, with the advice of the City Engineer, may 
decide), shall be let out by the said Cochituate W ater 
Board to the lowest responsible bidder. Notice that 
' the said Cochituate Water Board will receive propo- 
sals for such work shall in all cases be published 
at least five times (the last publication to be not 
less than one week before the opening of the bids) 
in such newspapers— not less than three— of the 
city of Boston (and when the said board may 
think it expedient, of other cities) as the said 
board may direct; such notice shall state the kind 
and estimated amount of work to be done or the 
materials to be furnished, and the time when to be 
done or furnished, and the place where plans and 
specifications may be seen, the place where and 
the period within which the bids will be re- 
ceived. Each bid must be signed by the bidder, 
and be accompanied « ith a bond for such sum, not 
less than $500, as the said board may determine, 
conditioned for the faithful execution of the con- 
tract, with sansfactory sureties for its perform- 
ance within the time required by the advertise- 
ment, in case the bid be accepted; or, in case the 
person or persons bidding shall prefer, a sum of 
money in such amount, not less than $500, as the 
said boaid may determine, may be deposited with 
the said board, in lieu of the bond above men- 
tioned; and said bond or deposit shall be forfeited 
to the city of BostoD in case the bidder fails to ex- 
ecute the contract within the time specified, if it 
is awarded to him. 

The bid and bond, duly signed and sealed, must be 
enclosed in a sealed envelope, and the bidder shall 
state his own place of residence and all other par- 
ticulars that the said boaid may require ic the 
terms of the advertisement. The bids shall be 
opened by the president of said board and pub 
licly read at the office of said board, in the pres- 
ence of the maiority of its members and any bid- 
der who may wish co be present, at such dav and 
hour as may be specified in the advertisement. A 
bond, with sureties or security satisfactory to the 
said board, shall in all cases be tequired for the 
faithful performance of the contract. The said 



board shall reserve the right to reject any or all 
bids for cause. 

Ordered, That the Cochituate Water Board be 
and they are hereby authorized to construct a 
siphon pipe across Charles River, on the line of 
Cochituate Aqueduct; and that the cost of the 
same be charged to the appropriation for Water 
Works. 

Alderman Stebbins— To enable the Cochituate 
Water Board to have the advantage of the entire 
working season, it is desirable that these orders 
should receive the favorable action of the City 
Council at a very early day. I presume that every 
member of this'Board has made up his mind how 
he shall vote upon this matter, and unless some 
member desires these orders to lie over, I shall 
ask that they may be passed tonight. 

Alderman Harris— I request that they may lie 
over. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins the report and 
orders were ordered to be printed, and specially 
assigned for Thursday next, at 4 P. M., to which 
time it was voted that the Board should adjourn. 

PERMIT FOR STABLE. 

Alderman Worthington, for the Committee on 
Health on the part of the Board, submitted a re- 
poit that leave be granted, on the usual condi- 
tions, to David H. Jones to occupy a new wooden 
stable for one horse on Porter street, No. 11, Ward 
1. Accepted. 

FURNITURE FOR POLICE STATION ELEVEN. 

Alderman Burrage.for the Committee on Police, 
submitted the following: 

Ordered, That the Coai raittee on Police be au- 
thorized to expend a sum not exceeding $2000 in 
providing for fixtures, furniture and bedding for 
Police Station House No. 11, Dorchester District; 
said sum to be charged to the appropriation for 
the Police Department. 

Read twice and passed. 

COST OF DORCHESTER POLICE STATION. 

Alderman Prescoct submitted the following: 
The Committee on Public Buildings beg leave to 
represent that ia consequence of the alterations 
ordered by the City Council in the new police sta- 
tion house, Ward 16, costing $1000, they will be 
obliged to ask for an additional amount to meet 
the expense already incurred for said alterations. 
Follow iug is an exhibit of the appropriation to 
date: 

Contracts for carpentry and masonry $39,83B.00 

Extra work on said contracts 342.46 

Plans, specifications and superintendence 1,753.52 

Heating apparatus, as per contract 2,418.25 

Printing and advertising 93.41 

Edgestones, water supply, vane and fuel 302.91 

Alterations to accommodate a branch of the 
Public Library, as per order City Council. . 975.00 

Total $45,721.55 

Appropriation for building 45,000.00 

Amount to be provided for $721.55 

Your committee would also report that about 
400 feet of fencing is required around the lot, 
wnich it is estimated will cost $950 ; also some per- 
manent fixtures in the building, estimated at $300, 
making the total amount to be provided for 
$1971.55. They would state that a balance of $2000 
rem-wns from the appropriation for Police Station 
House, South Boston, and would respectfully ask 
that the same be transferred to the appropriation 
for Police Station House, Ward 16. 

Referred to Committee on Finance and sent 
down. 

SWETT STREET. 

Alderman Worthington, for the Joint Commit- 
tee on Streets, to whom was referred, as a part of 
the unfinished ousiuess of the last City Council, 
an cder requesting the Committee on Finance to 
provide the means for laying out and building 
Swett street from Albany street to Dorchester 
aveime, submitted a report that the order ought 
to pass. Theieportwas accepted and the order 
passed. Seut down. 

SURVEY AND INSPECTION OF BUILDINGS. 

The annual report of the Inspector of Buildings 
[City Doc. Nc. 16] was received and sent down. 

The number of permits i<<-ued during the year 
was as fo'lows: For buildings of brick, stone, or 
iron, 520; for wooden and frame buildings, 1278; 
for repairs, alterations and additions, 2052; spe- 
cial permits, 23; steam boilers, engines, ovens and 
furnaces, 100; notices of intention to put in heat- 
ing apparatus, 87. Twenty-three permits have 
been granted lor the erection of wooden sheds 



35 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



for mechanical and storage purposes, and the 
number of permits issued during the yeur, under 
tne provisions of section 18, chapter 371, laws of 
1872, to set steam boilers and engines, and 
to build ovens and furnaces, is as follows: 
Steam boilers and engines, 69; oveDS, 15; fui- 
nace?, 13; forges, 3; total, 100. The num- 
ber of violations of statute and ordinance inves- 
tigated and reported upon was 891. The number 
of unsafe buildings examined and reported upon 
was 49 ; unsafe walls, 83 ; unsafe cornice, 1 ; unsafe 
floors, 4; unsafe gutters. 3; unsafe door caps, 2; 
unsafe window cap, 1; unsafe clothes shed, 1; un- 
safe conductor, 1; unsafe oven, 1; unsafe vault, 1; 
unsafe slate, 1; unsafe roof, 1; unsafe heating 
apparatus, 4; dangerous chimneys, 417; defective 
flues, 13. Ten surveys have been held on 
unsafe buildings during the year, all of which 
have been decided in favor tf the depart- 
ment. No appeals have been taken from ihe 
decisions of the surveyors. The number of 
buildings reported as damaged by fire and 
accident was 351, and the estimated dam- 
age was $590,720. The whole number of brick 
buildings comulsted during the year is 497, at an 
estimated cost of $14,211,120. These buildings 
contain 257stores, and are constructed to accommo- 
date 524 families. The whole jumber of wooden 
buildings completed during the year is 1029, con- 
taining 81 stores, and providing accommodations 
for 1366 families. The estimated cost of these 
completed wooden building is $2,586,615. In con- 



cluding his report the inspector says, I beg to sug- 
gest that some provision be made for the better 
enforcement of the statute re'. ating to the grade ot 
cellar bottoms. This department is req-iired to re- 
port all cases of violation to the Board ot Alder- 
men, but has no power to enforce the law, nor is 
there any one empowered to see that the orders of 
the Board of Aldermen are executed. One of the 
objects of the building law is to provide for the 
gradual removal of wooden buildings from within 
the building limits. It therefore prohibits the 
erection of any new buildings (except for cer- 
tain purposes), but places no limit to the amount 
of repairs which may be made upon an old 
building, without making it virtually a new one. 
It is very difficult sometimes to decide upon the 
application for permits to repair, especially in 
cases of buildings damaged by firr, and in my 
opinion a provision like that in foice in other 
cities, specifying the amount of repairs which 
may be made upon a wooden building, would be 
advantageous. I would also recommend the pas- 
sage of a law prohibiting the storing of lumber 
and other combustible material upon the roofs of 
buildings. 

INVITATION ACCEPTED. 

An invitation was received for the Mayor and 
Aldermen to attend the ball of the Second Battal- 
ion of Infantry on Feb. 3, inst. Accepted. 

On motion of Alderman Worthington the Board 
adjourned, and stood adjourned to Thursday next 
at 4 P. M. 



36 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY 4, 1875. 



Adjourned regular meeting at four o'clock P. M., 
his honor the Mayor presiding. 

EXECUTIVE NOMINATIONS. 

Constable — Denis A. Sullivan, for duty in the 
Treasury Department. 

Police Officer— William McCarthy, for duty on 
the police boat. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Committee on Paving. Eaton, Sawyer 
& Co. et al., that the ice and snow be removed 
from Chatham street. 

Cressy & Nbyes,for leave to locate receiving 
pipe for water sprinkler on front wall of building 
49 and 51 Wareham street. 

Chase, Shute & Co., to be paid for grade dam- 
ages at corner of Kilby and Central streets. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Board. J. Albert Johnston, for leave to occupy a 
new wooden stable for one horse on Norfolk street, 
Ward 16. 

Louis Earl, for leave to occupy a new wooden 
stable for one horse on Hartford street, Ward 16. 

ORDER OF NOTICE ON PETITION. 

A petition was received from the Boston Gas- 
light Company for leave to erect and use a sta- 
tionary engine of sixteen-horse power at corner of 
Snowbill and Hull streets, and an order of notice 
was passed for a hearing thereon to all parties ob- 
jecting on Tuesday, Feb. 23, instant. 

COMMUNICATIONS FROM CITY OFFICERS. 

Resignation. Communication from W. G. Sbat- 
tuck resigning the office of Warden in Ward 1. 
Placed on file. 

Citij Registrar. Report for quarter ending Jan. 
31 — Receipts for certificates of intentions of mar- 
riage, $595; number of births returned during 
1874, 11,640; marriages recorded, 4003; deaths re- 
corded, 7812. Sent down. 

City Clerk. Report for quarter ending Jan. 31 — 
Receipts: Recording mortgages, etc., $916,31; li- 
censes for billiard rooms, $77 : do. for auctioneers, 
$96; do. for intelligence offices, $10. Total, 
$1099.31. Sent down. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order to remit tax of $209.04, for 1874, assessed 
upon Henry W. Pickering, executor, together 
with interest and costs 

Order to assume tax, for 1874, assessed upon 
David Sears's heirs, on account of property de- 
vised to the Overseers of the Poor, amounting to 
$1018.68. 

Severally passed and sent down. 

Order to establish the grade of Culvert street, 
between Tremont and Cabot streets. 

Order to establish the grade of Knowlton street, 
between Telegraph and East Eighth streets. 

Severally passed. 

Order for Mayor to petition the Legislature for 
leave to establisl. the salaries of deputy collectors 
of taxes, and to provide for the payment of their 
fees into the treasury. 

Alderman Bigelow offered the following as a 
substitute : 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to petition the General Court, now in session, 
for the passage of an act authorizing the election 
or appointment of an Assistant City Treasurer, as 
the City CouncU may determine ; also authorizing 
the City Council to establish the salaries of the 
collectors and deputy collectors, and providing 
that all fees, costs, expenses or penalties now 
payable under statutes and ordinances to such 
officers shall hereafter be paid into the city treas- 
ury. 

The substitute was adopted, passed and sent 
down. 

ADDITIONAL WATER SUPPLY. 

The Board proceeded to consider the special as- 
signment, viz., orders to appropriate $1,500,000 
for water works, and vest authority m the Cochit- 
uate Water Board to take land for new conduit 
and such extension of the water works as may be 
required to convey Sudbury water to Chestnut 
Hill, including a new sipllon under Charles River 
(City Doc. No. 20). 



Alderman Stebbins moved to amend by insert- 
ing after the words "the bids shall be opened by 
the President of said board" (being the fifth line 
of fifth page), the words "or the presiding mem- 
ber." 

The amendment was adopted. 

Alderman Burrage — I am in favor of the object 
of this order, but think that the purposes for 
which this appropriation is made should be more 
clearly defined, and I offer the following amend- 
ments: 

Insert after words "Chestnut Hill Reservoir," in 
ninth line of first order, the words "according to a 
plan on a map in the appendix to City Document 
No. 29, of the year 1873, and the construction of 
one or more of the three storage reservoirs mark- 
ed I., II. and III. on said map." 

Insert after the words "such aqueduct," in 
tenth line of the first order, the words "and said 
reservoir or reservoirs." 

Insert after the words "necessary for," in sec- 
ond line on fourth page, the word "thus." 

Alderman Stebbins— Those amendments maybe 
all right, but if I have followed them correctly 
they would limit this order to the plan which is 
on file in City Document 29, which was prepared 
some two years ago. My impression is that there 
has been some change in the proposed line of the 
conduit since then, and if the amendment is 
pressed now I shall ask that the order may be laid 
over till next Monday. 

Alderman Burrage — I conferred with the City 
Engineer to see if there is any ocher plan. The 
order proposes to give the Water Board all the 
powers conferred by the act of 1872, which are 
very large. In making this appropriation, it 
seems to me we should know what we are about; 
before embarking in such a large enterprise we 
should know where we are to land. As the order 
is now drawn, the Cochituate Water Board, if 
they saw fit, could commence to take and pur- 
chase lands for seven, eight, ten, or twelve storage 
reservoirs. It . ia not, of course, supposed that 
they will do so; but in making this appropriation 
it seems to me that we should define it clearly, 
have it closely drawn, and not left open to abuse. 
I referred to that map, because it is the only one 
drawn, and I wish to give them power to con- 
struct a conduit which tue Engineer has mapped 
out; but I do not want to give them authority to 
construct a conduit somewhere else. 

Alderman Stebbins — I find that this plan referred 
to in the amendment was prepared in 1873, and I 
am quite confident that since then surveys have 
been made and a more favorable route consid- 
ered, by which a great saving in the expense will 
be made. If the amendments are pressed I shall 
ask that the ordei be laid over till Monday. It 
may be necessary to change this line a quarter of 
a mile, or a mile , one way or the other. In fact, 
in all great works of this kind we must place con- 
fidence in our engineers to a great extent, and not 
confine them to imaginary lines drawn upon 
pieces of paper. It seems to me that the adoption 
of this amendment will tie the hands of the Engi- 
neer in such a way as to be opposed to the best in- 
terest of the city. 

Alderman Burrage — I should be willing to let it 
lie over till this matter can be determined, or a 
definite line fixed upon, if that is all the trouble. 
It seems to me that it ought to be defined in some 
way — not particularly by this plan, but so that 
the work will be confined to that locality. 

Alderman Clark — It seems to me that it would 
be impossible for us to agree upon a specific line 
for a conduit for bringing the waters of Sudbury 
River and Farm Fond into Boston. There may 
have to be some diversion from this plan. We 
have a competent Engineer, and we must put 
faith in him for the construction of reservoirs 
and the building of aqueducts to give us an addi- 
tional supply of water. We have put our faith 
in him heretofore, and have not been de- 
ceived. He told us two years ago where to 
go to get an additional supply of water, 
and in all the investigations we have 
made, we have found that he has been correct. 
Now, it does seem to me that if we are satisfied 
that this is the best plan, all we can do is to give 
them the funds and leave the work in their hands. 
I think the City Engineer and the Water Board 
aie competent to do the work without our dicta- 
tion. I should hope that no more delay will be in- 
curred unless better reasons are given than I have 
heard. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins, the orders were 
laid on the table. Subsequently a recess of half 
an hour was had, at the conclusion of which the 



FEBRUARY 4, 1875 



37 



orders were taken from the table on motion of 
Alderman Clark. 

Alderma 1 Burrage withdrew the amendments 
previously offered by him and offered the follow- 
ing: 

Insert after the words "provided, however," 
in third and fourth line of page 4, the words, 
"that the number of storage reservoirs said Water 
Board is authorized to construct shall not exceed 
three, which shall be those known as Nos. 1, 2 and 
3, and—" 

The amendment was adopted and the orders as 
amended were passed— yeas 12, nays 0. Sent 
down. 

SUPERINTENDENTS OF BRIDGES. 

Alderman Power, for the Committee on Bridges, 
submitted a report nominating the following- 
named persons as superintendents of the bridges 
controlled in part by the city of Boston: 

Cottage Farm Bridge— Francis Caverly. 

Granite Bridge— Albert O. Hawes. 

Neponset Bridge — John Glavin. 

Cambridge Bridge — William Norton. 

Chelsea Bridge— Daniel S. Lawrence, Adam 
Bowlby. 

Western-avenue Bridge to Cambridge— William 
Norton. 

North Harvard- street Bridae— William Norton. 

Western-avenue Bridge to Watertown— O. F. 
Knox and M. W. Angler. 

The nominations were confirmed. 

LAMP DEPARTMENT. 

Alderman Stebbins for the Committee on Lamps, 
submitted the following : 

Ordered, That the Committee on Lamps be and 
they aro hereby authorized to contract with the 
Brookllne Gaslight Company for supplying the 
gas for lighting the streets in the section of the 
city where their mains extend, at the rate of $3 
per thousand cubic feet, from Feb. 15, 1875. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Lamps be 
and he is hereby authoiized under the approval of 
the Committee on Lamps during the municipal 
year 1875 to contract for and purchase the lamp- 
posts, brackets, burners, tips, cocks, lanterns, 
tools, stable supplies and such other articles as 
shall be found necessary for the carrying on of the 
Lamp Department ; also to employ such number 
of men in the repair shop of the department as 
may be necessary , the costjthereof to be charged 
to the appropriation for Lamps. 

Severally read once. 

NOTICE TO QUIT. 

Alderman Clark, for the Committee on Streets 
on the part of the Board, submitted an order of 
notice to Francis B. Austin and all others inter- 
ested, to "quit" on Pleasant street, Chailestown, 
on or before the 1st day of May next ensuing. 
Passed. 

SUFFOLK-STREET DISTRICT. 

Aldermen Stebbins offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Joint Special Committee on 
the Northampton-street District be authorized to 
exercise all the powers iu relation to the unsettled 
business on the Suffolk-street district which were 
conferred on the Committee of the City Council 
on said district for the year 1873. 
Read twice and passed. Sent down. 

REDIVISION OF THE WARDS 

On motion of Alderman Quincy, the Board took 
from the table the order for Mayor to petition the 
Legislature for authority to divide the city into 
wards, not exceeding thirty in number, with a 
representation of two Common Council men and 
two School Committee from each ward, and also 
to establish not exceeding three voting precincts 
in each ward ; with an amendment proposed by 
Alderman Power to strike out all relating to the 
representation of Common Council and School 
Committee from each ward. 

The question was on the amendment. 

Alderman Quincy— This order was tabled on the 
natural suggestion of the Alderman from Ward 15 
[Alderman Worthington], that this matter was 
under consideration by another committee, and 
perhaps courtesy required that we should not 
forestall their action. As I happen to be a mem- 
ber of the committee to which the new charter 
was referred, at their last meeting I called their 
attention to the fact, and I am authorized to state 
that that committee fully concur with the Com- 
mittee on Census and Revision of the Wards in 
regard to the desirability of present action. As 
I sai rl , the question is simply this : Char- 
ter or no charter, the census is to be 
taken, and the opportunity for a redivision 



will not return in ten years. Revision is impera- 
tive this year, and if we can go to the Legislature 
with a petition for authority to redivide the 
wards, the sooner the better. The advantage of 
going now is that we shall acquire a standing in 
court and cannot be excluded; once in we can 
change this order in any way — change the limit or 
ask for further representation— and we cannot be 
excluded. In regard to the amendment offered 
by the Alderman from Ward 12, 1 should favor it, 
it for no othei reason than that courtesy would 
require us to allow the members of the other 
branch to take the initiative. It seems to me that 
we might strike out the words "not exceeding 
thirty," and simply ask for authority V> divide the 
city into as many wards as the City Council may 
think expedient; but I do think the order should 
be passed now. 

The amendment of Alderman Power was adopt- 
ed, and the question was on the passage of the or- 
der as amended. 

Alderman Worthington— I think we should not 
pass this order at this time. I do not quite like 
the manner in which it is brought here. We have 
the new city charter before a special committee, 
and the City Council have yet to consider that 
whole subject. The gentleman who introduces 
this order says it is desirable to have it go to the 
Legislature that we may have a good standing in 
court, — in other words that this whole subject 
may be brought to the Legislature. Now, sir, my 
opinion is that we should have an expression 
from the City Government of Boston before 
we go to the Legislature on that subject. 
If we do this we shall be forcing thing in a 
way that will not meet the favor of the people or 
the Legislature. I think we should wait a little. 
It is too important a matter to be forced through 
here on so short notice. We should not be asked 
to vote upon it when it appears that tnere is some- 
thing behind it which is vastly more important 
than the order itself, and I shall object to such ac- 
tion at this time. So far as the redivision of the 
wards is concerned, I should not object; but if it 
is to bring the matter of representation and the 
whole subject of the city charter to the Legisla- 
ture before we have discussed it, I say that will 
be forcing the matter more than we should. 

The Chair— The Alderman is under a misappre- 
hension in regard to the order. As it now stands, 
it relates simply to the revision of the wards. The 
section relating to representation has been strick- 
en out. 

Alderman Worthington— I desire to say that I 
entirely understand that order. The intention is 
to get that order before the Legislature, and then 
any member of that body can rise in his place and 
move to substitute the new city charter for the 
order. 

Alderman Quincy— I can hardly think that such 
an amendment would be considered germane to 
the subject. I agree with the Alderman from 
Ward 15 that it is not yet time to consider this 
subject if it bound us to anything at>all— even if 
it bound us to increase the wards by a single 
ward. But it does not. It is simply to obtain 
power to increase them if we choose. The gen 
tleman has brought up a bugbear that does not 
exist. This matter was brought before the Com- 
mittee on the New Charter yesterday and I was 
authorized to say that they agreed perfectly with 
the Committee on the Revision of Wards, that this 
matter ought to be acted upon at once. Charter 
or no charter, the wards must be revised. I fail 
to see what reason the gentleman can have for 
supposing that this subject has any connection 
with the new charter. 

Alderman Worthington— Then I wish to ask the 
member what he means by having our case in the 
Legislature and we cannot be crowded out? If we 
go there with this subject and nothing more,if noth- 
ing else is intended, I am willing it should go. But 
it means the introduction of a bill of minor inter- 
est, and the substitution of a more important bill 
for it, as I have known to be done in my own ex- 
perience. I remember such an instance when we 
were trying to annex Roxbury to Boston. An 
effort was being made to annex a portion of the 
Back Bay, and an amendment was offered so that 
instead of confining the line to West Chester park 
and over to Parker street, it should include all of 
Roxbury. The Chair ruled that the amendment 
was competent, and the motion was put, but it 
was voted down. It would be equally competent 
for any member to substitute the new charter and 
bring that directly before the Legislature. And 
that is what I understand the gentleman to mean 
by our having a standing in court and we canno 



38 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



be crowded out. If he says it means nothing 
more than what is conveyed [in the order, then I 
am content. 

Alderman Quincy — I can assure the gentleman 
the cat of the new charter is by no means hidden 
in this petition for authority to increase the num- 
ber of wards. By having a standing in conrt, I 
mean that by asking for authority to redivide the 
wards and establish voting precincts, we secure a 
place on the calendar, as it were, and we can 
change it if we wish. We can ask for a limit of 
thirty wards, or for a larger limit. But if we do 
not get into court during the next two weeks, we 
shall have a great oeal of trouble, as they may 
enforce the rule excluding new business. I can 
assure the gentleman thac so far as this commit- 
tee is concerned, they are innocent of any knowl- 
edge of a cat in the meal. 

Alderman Woithington — I did not mean to 
charge that there is a cat in the meal ; but it look- 
ed to me like a plan to briug the city charter be- 
fore the Legislature before we had acted upon it, 
That, I think, ought not to be done. 

Alderman Clark— I can conceive not the slight- 
est objection to this order, tor I think it is of the 
highest importance. I believe it is of the utmost 
importance to have the census taken this year, or 
we cannot take it at all; and if we wish the right 
to re-district the city, it will be necessary to get 
it from the Legislature. Now, it is uncertain 
whether the new charter will be adopted or not; 
that question remains to be settled in the future. 
As a member of the committee who now have the 
charter under consideration, I should think that 
none of our prerogatives will be takan from us if 
thin order is sent to the Legislature. I should hope 
that the petition will be puc in for something of 
this kind. It will take some time to go through 
and examine the new charter, and I hope the pub- 
lic will not be too anxious for a report. A com- 
mittee cannot do in two or three weeks what it 
has taken the commission a year to prepare. 

Alderman Worthington — After the explanations 
of the gentleman I shall not object to the passage 
of the order. 

The order as amended was passed and sent 
down. 

At this point a recess of half an hour was taken. 

ELECTION OF FIKST ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

Alderman Harris moved that the Board proceed 
to an election of First Assistant Assessors. 

Alderman Clark hoped they would not proceed 
to an election, as he desired more time to look 
over the list. He moved the Board adjourn. 

The Board refused to adjourn, and a ballot was 
ordered. Aldermen Harris and Stebbins were ap- 
pointed a committee to collect and count votes. 
They reported the following as the result of the 
several ballots : 

First Ballot. 

Whole number of votes cast 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

William J. Ellis 12 

John Noble 12 

George D. Kicker 12 

Charles F. McDavitt 5 

John Brown 10 

Roger H. Scannell 6 

Horace Loring 12 

Charles E. Jackson 9 

P. Ambrose Young 11 

William H. Cundy : 12 

Edward F. Robinson 11 

Theophilus Burr 10 

George F. Williams 12 

Otis Rich 10 

Joseph R. Grose 12 

Edwin B. Spinney 12 

Joseph L. Drew.... 11 

John H. Giblin 11 



L. Foster Morse 12 

George F. Davis 8 

Andrew J. Browne 12 

George A. Comins 12 

Phineas B. Smith , -. lo 

William Withington 12 

Henry Pierce 12 

John Pierce 11 

Charles Nowell ,10 

Gideon Walker 12 

Henry W. Dickerman 12: 

Joshua S. Duncklee 12 

William B. Long 12 

Nahum Chapin 12 

George S. Pendergast 12 

George H. Williams 5 

James K. Crowley o 

Charles F. McDavitt 5 

A. G. Wyman 6 

Michael Carney 5 

A. R. Holden 4 

James Healey 3 

Thomas L. Jenks 2 

H. N. Holbrook 1 

And the thirty-one gentlemen who received the 
necessary numoei of votes were declared elected. 

Second Ballot. 

A. G. Wyman 6 

J. K. Crowley 5 

Michapl Carney 4 

R. H. Scannell 3 

Charles F. McDavitt 2 

G. H. Williams 2 

And there was no choice. 

Alderman Pre? cott— In order that members of 
the Board may hwe an opportunity to see who is 
elected, and who are the candidates not elected, 
and what districts are not represented, it seems to 
me that further balloting had better be dispensed 
with until the next meeting. I therefore move 
that the Board adjourn. 
The motion was lost. 

Third Ballot. 

J. K. Crowley 7 

A. G. Wyman 5 

M. Carney 5 

R. H. Scannell 3 

C. F. McDavitt 2 

G. H. Williams 2 

Mr. Crowley was declared elected. 
Fourth Ballot. 

A. G. Wyman 5 

M. Carney 4 

C. F. McDavitt 2, 

R. H. Scannell 1 

And there was no choice. 

Fifth Ballot. 

A. G. Wyman 7 

M. Carney 4 

C. F. McDavitt 1 

And Mr. Wyman was declared elected. 

Certificate sent down of the election of 

William J. Ellis, George F. Davis, 

John Noble, Andrew J. Browne, 

George D. Bicker, George A. Comins, 

John Brown, Phineas B. Smith, 

Horace Loring, William Withington, 

Charles E. Jackson, Henry Pierce, 

P. Ambrose Young, John Pierce, 

Wm. H. Cundy, Charles Nowell, 

Edward F. Robinson, Gideon Walker, 

Theophilus Burr, Henry W. Dicker no an, 

George F. Williams, Joshua S. Duncklee, 

Otis Rich, William B. Long, 

Joseph R. Grose, Nahum Chapin, 

Edwin B. Spinney, George S. Pendergast," 

Joseph L. Drew, James K. Crowley, 

John H. Giblin, Abraham G. Wyman. 
L. Foster Morse, 

On motion of Alderman Clark the board ad- 
journed. 



39 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of. the Common Council, 

FEBRUARY 4, 1875. 



Regular weekly meeting at 7% o'clock P. M., 
Halsey J. Boardman, President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OP ALDERMEN FOR 
CONCURRENCE. 

Annual reports of Superintendent of Sewers 
and Inspector of Buildings; quarterly reports of 
City Clerk and Registrar of Births and Marriages. 
Placed on file. 

Request of Committee on Public Buildings ; pe- 
titions of Joseph Dorr et al. Severally referred. 

Reports recommending: leave to withdraw on 
the petitions of E.S.Johnson, for refunding of 
tax ; of J . F. Parley, administrator, to he reim- 
bursed for tax erroneously paid. Severally ac- 
cepted. 

Report that the City Council has no authority to 
grant petition of D. B. McKenzie that the taxes 
assessed upon the Appleton Temporary Home 
may be refunded. Accepted. 

Order for the City Engineer to make such pur- 
chases of supplies, instruments, drawing mate- 
rials and furniture, and to incur such other ex- 
penses as may be necessary in his department 
during the present municipal year. 

Order for the Committee on Public Buildings to 
supply necessary furniture, and cause such re- 
pairs and cleaning to be made as may be needed 
in the several schoolhouses. 

Order for the City Surveyor to make such pur- 
chases of supplies, instruments, drawing mate- 
rials and furniture, and to incur such other ex- 
penses as may be necessary in his department 
during the present municipal year. 

Order for the Committee on Public Buildings to 
supply furniture for and cause necessary cleaning 
and repairs to he made in the City Hal 1 , police 
stations and engine houses, and other public 
buildings, where the same are not made by the 
departments using the same. 

Order for the purchase of law books for the City 
Solicitor's office, at a cost not exceeding $275. 

Report and an ordinance to amend an oroinance 
relating to the Law Department, providing for the 
appoirtment cf a Fourth Assistant Solicitor, and 
providiLg for the empiovment of extra assistance 
when necessary. 

Orders and ordinance severally ordered to a 
second reading. 

Report recommending the passage of the order- 
requesting the Committee on Finance to provide 
the means for laying out and building Swett street 
from Albany street to Dorchester avenue. Report 
accepted and order passed. 

Report and order to remit tax of $209.04, with in- 
terest and costs, assessed H.W. Pickering, admin- 
istrator of Caroline Newman. Order passed to a 
second reading. 

Report and order to assume tax of $1018.68 as- 
sessed on estate bequeathed to the Overseeis of 
the Poor by David Sears. Order passed to a sec- 
ond reading. 

Order conferring power to settle outstanding 
business of Suffolk-street district on Joint Spe- 
cial Committee on Northampton-street District. 
Read twice and passed. 

Repoit and order for Mayor to petition the 
Legislature for authority to elect or appoint As- 
si tant City Treasurer and Collector, or both, and 
establish salary for same, and providing for the 
payment of present fees of deputy collectors into 
the city treasury. Order read twice and passed. 

Order for Mayor to petition the Legislature for 
authority to divide the city into not exceeding 
thirty wards, and establish voting precincts. Read 
twice and passed. 

Report and order for Treasurer to borrow $1,- 
500,000 for building a conduit to Farm Pond, and 
build storage reservoirs on Sudbury River, and 
confeniug powers on Cochituate Water Board to 
take and purchase lands necessary for conveying 
said water to Chestnut Hill Reservoir, etc., and to 
lay a new siphon pipe across Charles River, with 
an amendment limiting the reservoirs to be built 
to Nos. 1, 2 and 3, etc. Order passed to a second 
reading. 

Report nominating the following-named per- 
sons as First Assistant Assessors: William J. 
Ellis, John Noble, Michael Carney, George D. 



Ricker, Charles F. McDavitt, Roger H. Scannell, 
Horace Loring, P. Ambrose Young, William H. 
Cundy, Edward F. Robinson, Theophilus Burr, 
Jobn H. Gihlin, George F. Williams, Otis Rich, 
Joseph R. Grose, Edwin B. Spinney, Joseph L. 
Drew, L. Foster Morse, George F. Davis, Andrew 
J. Browne, George A. Comins, Phineas B. Smith, 
William Withington, Henry Pierce, John Pierce, 
Gideon Walker, Henry W. Dickerman, George H. 
Williams, Joshua S. Duncklee, William B. Long, 
Nahum Chapin, George S. Pendergast, Thomas L. 
Jenks. Accepted. 

Certificate of election, as such assessors, of 
William J. Ellis, John Noble, George D. Ricker, 
j ohn Brown, Horace Loring, Charles E.Jackson, 
P. Ambrose Young, William H. Cundy, Edward F. 
Robinson, Theophilus Burr, George F. Williams, 
Otis Rich, Joseph R. Grose, Edwin B. Spinney, 
Joseph L. Drew, John H. Giblin, L. Foster Morse, 
George F. Davis, Andrew J. Browne, George A. 
Comins, Phineas B. Smith, William Withington, 
Henry Pierce, John Pierce, Charles Nowell, 
Gideon Walker, Henjy W. Dickerman, Joshua S. 
Duncklee, William B. Long, Nahum Chapin, 
George S. Pendergast, James K. Crowley, Abra- 
ham G. Wyman. 

The nominations were laid over. 

ELECTIONS. 

The following elections occurred : 
City Messenger. Certificate of the election of 
Alvah H. Peters as City Messenger, by the Board 
of Aldermen. Messrs. Burgess of Ward 3, Wal- 
bridge of Ward 12, and Sweetser of Ward 10 were 
the committee to collect and count votes. They 
reporied that Alvah H. Peters received fifty-four 
votes, the whole number cast, and he was declar- 
ed elected in concurrence. 

Clerk of Committees. Certificate of the election 
of James M. Bughee as Clerk of Committees by 
the Board of Aldermen. Messrs. Sprague of Ward 
4, Smith of Ward 10, and Stacey of Ward 21 were 
the committee to collect and count votes. They 
reported that James M. Bugbee had received fif- 
ty-eight votes, the whole number cast, and he was 
dec'ared elected in concurrence. 

Member of Cochituate Water Board. Certifi- 
cate of the election of Uriel H. Crocker in place 
of Amos L. Noyes chosen by this Council. Messrs. 
Woods of Ward 8, Rice of Ward 19, and Newton of 
Ward 14 were the committee to collect and count 
votes. They lepoited as follows: 

Whole number of votes cast 60 

Necessary to a choice 31 

Amos L. Noyes had 34 

Uriel H. Crocker 26 

And Mr. Noves was declared elected in non-con- 
currence. Cerrificate sent up. 

Trustees of City Hospital — Certificate of elec- 
tion of Hugh O'Brien of the Board of Aldermen 
and Otis H. Pierce and Henry H. Sprague of the 
Common Councd as Trustees of the Citv Hospital. 
Messes. Cushman of Ward 1, Kingsley of Ward 
3, and Hicks of Ward 8 were the committee to col- 
lect ana count votes. 

Whole number of votes cast 58 

Necessary to a choice 30 

Alderman Hugh O'Brien 58 

Councilman Otis H. Pierce 55 

' Henry H. Sprague 56 

" George A. Shaw 1 

" John Osborne, Jr 1 

" Jeremiah Harrigan 1 

J. E. Duggan 1 

And Alderman O'Brien and Councilmen Pierce 
and Sprague were declared elected in concur- 
rence. 

Assessors. Report nominating and certificate 
of election by the Board of Aldermen of the fol- 
lowing-named pet sons as Assessors: Thomas 
Hills, Benjamin Cushing, Horace Smith, Thomas 
J. Bancroft, Benjamin F. Palmer. Messrs. Curtis 
of Ward 17, Duggan of Ward 5, and H»rmon of 
Ward 6 were the committee to collect and count 
votes. 

Whole number of votes cast 61 

Necessary to a choice 31 

Thomas Hills 60 

Benjamin Cushing : 61 

Horace Smith 60 

Thomas J. Bancroft 61 

Benjamin F. Palmer > 59 

Dr. Thomas L. Jenks 1 

Leonard R. Cutter 1 

Joseph R.Grose 1 

J. 1YL Maguire 1 

Messrs. Hills, Cushing, Smith, Bancroft and 
Palmer were declared elected in concurrence. 

Director for Public Institutions. Certificate of 
election of Councilman William G. Train, by the 



FEBRTJAEY 4 , 1875. 



40 



Board of Aldermen, in place of Councilman Wil- 
liam C. Burgess, cliosen by this Council. Messrs. 
Devereux of Ward 22, Wilsou of Ward 12, and 
Jaques of Ward 9 were the committee to collect 
and count votes. . 

Whole number of votes cast 66 

Necessary to a choice 34 

William G. Train had 42 

William C. Burgess hau 24 

And Mr. Train was declared elected in concur- 
rence. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order authorizing the Superintendent of Health 
to contract for the purchase of hay and grain, and 
such horses and enchanges as may be required for 
his department from time to time. 

Order authorizing the Mayor to draw upon the 
Treasurer for the payment, of executions and 
judgments of courts against the citv. 

Order authorizing necessary repairs to be made 
on bathhouses, and the employment of assistance 
for the care of the same. 

Severally passed in concurrence. 

Order authorizing the Treasurer to pay Francis 
A. Hall three city of Boston gold coupons, of $25 
each, alleged to have been burned, on the condi- 
tions set forth in said order. Passed and sent up. 

Order autnorizing a transfer of f 500 from the 
appropiiation for Incidental Expenses to that for 
Contingent Fund of the Common Council . Passed 
—yeas 64, nays 0. Sent up. 

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY. 

The order for flags to be displayed and a nation- 
al salute to be fired at Eist and South Boston, the 
citv proper, the Highlands, Dorchester, West 
Ro'xbury, Brighton and Charlestown, at noon on 
the 22d inst., in commemoration of the birthday 
of Washington, was considered under the head of 
unfinished business. 

The question was on the parsage of the order. 

Mr. Whitniore of Ward 4—1 move to amend by 
striking out the words "city proper." I think it 
is unnecessary to have the guns fired within the 
city proper. The very reasons which led to the 
formation ol the nr'eseot ordinance in 1873 are 
sufficient to show that this is an occasion when 
the authority of the City Council should be exer- 
cised. I have before me the report made in 1873, 
in which reasons were given for curtailing the 
liberty of firing salutes within the city, and the 
committee at that time reported the evidence 
taken by them, and the opinions of several dis- 
tinguished physicians that it was an unmitigated 
nuisance, highly injurious and prejudicial to the 
health of peopie living anywhere near the Com- 
mon. This being a minor holiday, it seems to me 
to be necessary to spare the people from this in- 
fliction. For that reason I offer the amendment. 

The amendment was lost b> a rising vote — 26 for, 
27 against. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6—1 hope gentlemen will 
consider this matter seriously. It seems to me 
that if they think about it for a moment, they will 
see that there is no use in firing those cannon 
upon the Common. Nol ody goes up there to see 
the firing. We, in our places of business, merely 
hear some noise. The firing of cannon in a thick- 
ly settled city is plainly of no use and does do 
harm. If the people in South anrl East Boston 
and the suburbs want cannon fired, there is no 
objection, 'out it seems to me that we who live in 
the centre of the city don't care to have the can- 
non fired, and that the displaying of flags will be 
sufficient. 

Mr. Peabody of Ward 9—1 would like to suggest 
that perhaps the amendment goes a little further 
than was intended, as it puts a stop to the display 
of flags. I suppose it was intended to prevent the 
firing of cannoD, but if it had been adopted it 
would have prevented the display of flags. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5—1 should hope that this 
time-honored custom will not be done away with. 
The people of Boston desire to hear the cannon 
fired upon the biithday of the father of the coun- 
try. They don't ask that it be fired in South Bos- 
ton, or Roxbuiy, or upon Bunker Hill; but upon 
that time-honored place, Boston Common, 
where every man, woman and child in the 
city proper and suburbs, and those who come 
here from the surrounding districts, may 
hear the national salute, for it is nothing 
else. I have heard this opposition to firing can- 
non upon the Common for a few years past. Is 
there a gentleman here who can rise in his 
place and say it has harmed a living being? The 
sentimentalists that surround the Common would 



prevent the people i'roA my district and from 
the North End and other portions of the city from 
visiting the Common, if they could have their 
way. They wou'd prevent uhe boys from coasting 
upon tiie Common; they would prevent any na- 
tional display in any way which would be con- 
formable to the desires and interests of the people 
of the city. I hope there will be no change in this 
time-honered custom. But, sir, I am willing to leave 
it to his Honor the Mayor, and everybody knows 
that it is within his power to control the matter. 
With the honoied gentleman who sits at the helm, 
I as one member heie, and my constituents, sir — 
for I speak for them — are willing t jat this matter 
shall be controlled by his Honor. Is it proposed 
that in the ci*y proper flags shall not be raised 
upcn that honored day — the birthday of the 
father of his country? Why, sir, this is nothing 
but the same sentiment which has, and I suppose 
will forever surround that Common, and try to 
prevent those little courtesies and conveniences 
which Boston Common was given us for the 
use of. I hope there will be no change, and that 
this order will pa^s this branch of the City Coun- 
cil, because I believe that it represents the desires 
of the people. 

Mr.Brackett or Ward 10— I move to amend by 
striking out "and a national salute be fired at 
noon," so thit the day will oe observed by a dis- 
play of flags, but no cannon be fired. 

The amendment was lost, by a rising vots— 28 
for, 38 against. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6— In order to put the or- 
der in the shape that would prevent the firiug of 
cannon on the Common,butuotpreventthedispJay 
of flags, I move to insert after the words "public 
buildings and grounds" the words "thoughout 
the city," and strike out the words "city proper," 
so that cannon may be fired in all parts of the city 
except the city proper. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6—1 hope that amendment 
will be adopted. In reply to the gentleman from 
Ward 5, who a ked if there is any one who knew 
of injury being inflicted by the firing of cannon 
upon the Common, I would state that it has come 
within my personal knowledge that a lady unable 
to be moved from her house Was injured by tho 
shocks which the firing of the cannon on the Com- 
man caused to her nervotrs system. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 16—1 hope the amendment 
will not prevail for the reason given by the gentle- 
men from Ward 6, which is no more cogent for 
the Common than for Dorchester, for there are 
nervous ladies in Dorchester as well as near the 
Common. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6 — Gentlemen must appre- 
ciate that there is a difference between Dorches- 
ter and the Common. There are a great many 
peovle living near the Common, while in Dor- 
chester there are a great many points where peo- 
ple would not be troubled by it. In the city where 
there are so many people living inclose proximity 
to the Common it has done an injury, and it 
seems to me to be desirable that the firing of can- 
non thould not be continued. If gentlemen in 
Dorchester should n't wish to have cannon fired 
near their homes, I would be happy to vote that 
they be exempt from the nuisance. But I think 
it is desirable not to have the cannon fired on Bos- 
ton Common. 

Mr. Jaques of Ward 9 — I hope the amendment 
will prevail. It seems to me that a wrong reason 
is given and a wrong impression created by the at- 
tempts at explanation. If 1 understand it, the ob- 
jection is that the salute is not more a nuisance 
on Boston Common, because of the greater num- 
ber of residents near there, and the gentleman 
from Dorchesler doesn't state the proposition 
correctly. The real reason is that the Common is 
surrounded by buildings, and the reverberations 
produce a much mure painful effect than on more 
open grouuds. I suppose that no one would ob- 
ject to cannon being fired upon the open ground — 
for instance upon the Back Bay. But in a con- 
tracted space the effect is very different, and 
there are dangers which people are obliged to un- 
dergo, as I can testify, every time a salute is 
fiied on the Common. I know of one case where 
the effect upon a patient proved very painful. 

Mr. Guild of Ward 6 — I cannot see why a cus- 
tom that is excellent or time honored should be 
perpetuated for that reason simply. We have had 
a custom of filing crackers, letting off fireworks, 
sounding gongs, and making^ night hideous on 
the night before the Fourth of July. Still this is a 
time-honored custom, and some people desire to 
cling to it; and because the cannon are fired on 
Boston Common, and people's ear drums are crush- 



41 



COMMON COUNCIL 



ed, it is argued that we ought to continue it 
on every public day. 

Now, sir, the ground was so very well cohered 
by the gentleman last up, that it seems to me 
hardly necessary to have anything said further'. 
It certainly is an unmitigated nuisance, this dis- 
charging of artillery in the midst of the dense 
population near Boston Common. It has seemed 
to me tbat in presenting this question those who 
live at a distance from the Common are very will- 
ing to liave the artillery discharged there to its 
fullest extent in the celebration of Washington's 
Birtbday . I think there is no gentleman in this hall 
who would not he as patriotic as possible in 
the celebration of the birthday of the father of his 
cenntry; out at the same time I think some of us 
ought to have a little regard for tne wishes and 
conveniences ana health of oui fellow citizens. I, 
for one, can testify of a case where a severe ill- 
ness was very much aggravated by the discharge 
of artillery on the Common. The residents there 
get the benefit of it, while in the open spaces at 
East Boston, Dorchester and the Highlands, th3 
annoyance does not occur. 

Mr. Kingsbury of Ward 15— It strikes me that 
the amendment of the gentleman from Ward 6 is 
entirely unnecessary. This order piovides for a 
sa'ute in the city proper, but not for one on Bos- 
ton Common. There are, as has been suggested, 
open spaces on the Back Bay, and if the Mayor 
sees fit the salute can be fired there. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5—1 have noted the remarks 
of the gentlemen, especially those of my friend 
from the Sixth Ward [Mr. Kimball]. I notice, 
sir, that he states that one woman's nervous sys- 
tem was troubled. I have noticed during the last 
year that several men's nervous systems — es- 
pecially members of the Council — have been dis- 
turbed. Now, sir, out of 375,000 people — which is 
the population of the city of Boston, from figures 
which I have had the honor to collect within the 
last three months— one old lady's nervous system 
has been injured! Now, my friend from the 
Ninth Ward [Mr. Jaques] argues that this salute 
should not be fired upon Boston Common, and that 
there is room beyond Boston Common— that there 
is a large open district on the Back Bay. Per- 
haps there is; perhaps it is under water, too, and 
it will take a great deal of the city's money to re- 
claim it and make it decent and healthy.— I don't 
know that they can do it. But, sir, his Honor 
the Mayor, ivho is at the head of this corporation, 
has the right to discriminate in this matter. 
Think of one woman's nervous fy^tem being af- 
fected ! Why, sir, a great many women's nervous 
systems have been affected without the firing of 
cannon! This seems to be a frivolous opposition. 
There is a sentiment in this thing which the Coun- 
cil cannot get rid of. Let us stand by this time- 
honored custom. It is nothing, says the honored 
fentleman from the Sixth Ward [Mr. Guild]. 
ime-honored custom is nothing. I believe 
in the beating of gongs and building of 
bonfires on national holidays. I believe in 
the Fourth of July and Washington's Birthday, 
and I believe it is our duty as patriotic citizens to 
stand by those time-bonored customs. When it 
can be proved that one woman's nervous system 
is affected, that does not prove that 374,999 people 
re not to congratulate themselves, their w'ves and 
children and neighbors upon the return of the 
glorious birthday of the father of our country. I 
hope the order will pass as it was offered, because 
it is our right, and it will be an honor to pass it as 
it is. 

Mr. Crocker— It was suggested that the salute 
might be fired upon the extreme part of the Back 
Bay. It seems to me that when an order is passed 
to fire a salute in the city proper, the Mayor would 
not assume to remove it from the place where the 
time-honored custom has prevailed of firing if. 
As to the argument of the gentleman from Ward 
5, that the life or death of one lady don't amount 
to so much powder — I will let that go for what it 
is worth. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5—1 said nothing about the 
life or ueath of one lady. I said one woman's 
nervous system. The gentleman's [Mr. Crocker] 
nervous system has been frequently troubled, and 
will be again, I think. 

The amendment offered by Mr. Crocker was lost 
—36 for, 37 against. 

The order was then passed— yeas 63, nays 4. 

Yeas — Messrs. Anderson, Barry, Beal, Bent, 
Brackett, Burditt, Burgess, Cawley, Clarke, Coyle, 
Crocker, Curtis, dishing, Cushman, Damon, Day, 
Devereux, Duggan, Edwards, Fitzgerald, Fitz- 
patrick, Flynn, Goldthwait, Guild, Harmon, Har- 



rigan, Hicks, Hiscock, Kelley, Kingsbury, Kings- 
ley, Leighton, Long, Mooney, Morrison, Murray, 
Newton, Noyes, Osborne, Page, Parker, Peabody, 
Perkins, Pierce, Power, Rice, Sampson, Shaw, 
Sibley, Smith, Sprague, Stacey, Sweetser, 
Thacber, Train, Wadsworth, Walbridge, Walsh, 
Whitcomb, Wilbur, Willcutt, Wilson, Woods— 63. 

Nays— Messrs. Jaques, Kimball, Loring, Whit- 
more — 4. 

Mr. Noyes of Ward 5 moved a reconsideration of 
the last vote, hoping it would not prevail. Lost. 

Order sent up. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

By Mr. Leighton of Ward 1— Petition of Flax 
Pond Water Company, for a hearing in regard to 
furnishing a supply for East Boston. Referred to 
Joint Committee oil Water. 

By Mr. Train of Ward 13— Petition of Patrick 
Sharkey to be paid for grade damages on Eustis 
street. Sent up. 

By Mr. Willcutt of Ward 17— Petition of West 
Roxbury Free Library for a transfer to the Public 
Library of Boston. Referred to Joint Committee 
on Public Library, v with instructions to give the 
petitioners a bearing. 

By Mr. Whitmore of Ward 4— Petition of His- 
toric, Genealogical Society, calling attention to 
Boston's imperfect record of births and deaths 
prior to 1845, and asking that the same may be 
corrected by reference to parish and other rec- 
ords. Referred to the Committee on the Public 
Librery. 

Severally sent up. 

REPORTS OF NOMINATING COMMITTEES. 

Reports of nominating committees were sub- 
mitted recommending elections as follows: 

By Sir. Thacher of Ward 15— For Superintend- 
ent of Public Lands, Robert W. Hall; for Super- 
intendent of Sewers, William H. Bradley. 

By Mr. Noyes of Ward 5— For Superintendent of 
Common and Public Grounds, John Galvin. 

By Mr. Long of Ward 8— For Commissioner of 
Cedar Grove Cemetery, Frank L. Tileston ; for 
City Solicitor, John P. Healy ; for Water Regis- 
trar, William F. Davis. 

By Mr. Osborne of Ward 8 — For Superintendent 
of Streets, Charles Harris. 

By Mr. Woods of Waid 8— For Harbor Master, 
John T. Gardner. 

By Mr. Kingsbury of Ward 15 — For Superintend- 
ent of Public Building's, James C. Tucker. 

By Mr. Willcutt of Ward 17— For City Surveyor, 
Thomas W. Davis. 

Reports severally accepted and nominations 
laid over. 

BADGES. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 the order for 
a special committee to procure badges for mem- 
bers of the Council, at a cost not exceeding $15 
for each badge, was taken up. 

The question was upon the passage of the or- 
der, 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6—1 move to amend by 
substituting "f 5" for "f 15." 

Mr. Jaques of Ward 9 — I do not know that it is 
in order, but I would like to ask if the question 
could be divided so that we should first settle 
whether any badges are to be procured. If that 
is settled in the affirmative, then the question of 
price can be determined. But if the whole ques- 
tion be made one, it is certainly very difficult for 
those who oppose voting any badges to know how 
to vote. Here is a gentleman asking us to vote 
for a low-priced badge, and if we are to have 
badges I do not want to vote agaiust that. I think 
it would facilitate the action of gentlemen on 
both sides to have the question divided, and I 
move a division. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6— In addition to the 
amendment of "$5" for "$15" which I offered, I 
would like to move a second amendment by add- 
ing to the order the words "provided that no 
badge shall be procured for any member who 
shall, within five days from the passage of this 
order, notify the committee in writing of his de- 
sire not to receive one." It does seem to me that 
those members of the Common Council who do 
not desire a bari ge ought not, in courtesy, to be 
compelled to receive them. The amendment is 
similar to the one which I offered at the lastmeet- 
ing, but the question upon it was not taken 
by a rising votp, or by yeas and nays — it wis sim-' 
ply put and declared not carried/ I have made 
this motion at this time, asking the Council to 
consider it as if it were offered for the first time, 
and to consider whether or not those members 
who do not wish badges should be compelled to 



FEBRUARY 4, 1875 



42 



take them under a penalty, if they refuse, of hav- 
ing; a badge with their names upon one floating 
about City Hall, or somewhere else. In order co 
take the sense of the Council upon this question, 
I shall call for the yeas and 1'ays. As I 
stated at the last meeting, if we put the limit 
at $15 awe shall get a badge worth about $9 
intrinsically. If we put the limit at $5 
we shall get a badge woith nearly that amount, 
because there will not be the chance among 
manufacturers to give us a badge so far in 
value from the amount of money we pay. If we 
have a badge at all I hope we shall have one for 
use, and a cheap one will answer that purpose. I 
will not take any more time, because the subject 
was fully discussed at the last meeting, and any- 
thing that can be said now will add nothing to 
what was said then. 

The question was taken upon the amendment to 
substitute "$5" for "$15," and it was lost. 

The question then recurred on the second 
amendme-ot of Mr. Kimball by adding the words 
"provided," etc. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7—1 hope that amendment 
will prevail, and that any member who does not 
wish to receive a badge need not have oi.e. 

The amendment was adopted. 

Mr. Kvmball of Ward 6—1 still think that the 
price which we have placed upon these badges is 
too high. I am soriy to take so much time of the 
Council, but I am satisfied that those badges of 
last yeai were not worth $9, and I believe that we 
can get a cheaper badge if we wish. I therefore 
move to substitute "$10.50" for "$15." The reason 
I do not move $16 is because it was voted down at 
the last meeting. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7—1 only desire to say that 
the gentleman [Mr. Kimball] was on the commit- 
tee who procured the baftges last year, with two 
other gentlemen, and a bid was made or handed 
in by a party twenty-five cents lower than that 
of the one to whom he gave the contract, and it 
was refused by the gentleman, while the other 
members of the committee favored giving it to 
the other bidder, who would have given a better 
badge. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6— This is the first time I 
ever heard or knew of that thing. I knew of 
nothing said about a bid being made. I knew of 
nothingbut two bona fide bids, and those were 
twenty-five cents apart, and I think the gentle- 
man is entirely mistaken in saying that a bid was 
put in for the making of a badge for $10. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7—1 did not say $10, but that 
there w„'sa bid for twenty-five cents less than the 
one for which it was awarded. 

Mr. Kimball— I entirely misunderstood the gen- 
tleman. I thought I caught the words "ten dol- 
lars." That is very true, but unfortunately I was 
the minority of the committee, and happened to 
have the casting vote, I believed that the party 
bidding twenty-five cents more would give the 
better badge and I voted for him to receive the 
work. 

Mr. Morrison of Ward 9—1 hope the amendment 
will not pass. We are obliged as the order now 
stands to give $15. As I am opposed to badges I 
shall vote against all amendments. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 5— As very few members 
voted upon the amendment making the price $5 
and as I think a cheap badge a proper thing, 
and as I would not be put in the embarrassing 
position of taking or refusing a $15 badge, I 
move to amend so as to fix the price at $6 and 
on that I call for the yea* and nays. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 16—1 would suggest that 
that amendment has been voted down. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5—1 am in favor of badges, 
and I am in favor of a good badge, and if cheap 
members want cheap badges they can have them. 
I refer to nobody, sir. Mr. President, I had the 
honor to read the Boston Transcript which con- 
tains the doings of the last Council, I believe 
it is always in order to refer to the official record 
taken by the official reporter. I notice that one 
gentleman rises in his place and says— 

"I always like to hear the gentleman from Ward 
5 talk. He reminds me of a little piece of poetry, 
which runs something like this — 

"There was a little man 

And he had a little soul, 
And he said, 'Little soul, let us try, try, try, 

To go beyond your reach, 

And make a little speech, 
Just to please you and I, little soul, 
Just to please you and I.' " 

Now, Mr. President, that member goes on to 
state that he does n't quote from Shakspeare, but 



he quotes from that lamented orator and poet of 
Ireland, Tom Moore ; and if ha had quoted Tom 
Moore literally it vnould be very well. I don't say 
whether he did or not; I will lea\e that to the 
scholars here and to those who have read Tom 
Moore as I have done for years past. Now, sir, I 
am not about to quote Shakspeare nor Tom 
Moore; neither from any of the great 
poets or orators of the past ; neither 
from Mark Ar.tony as be spoke over the dead 
body of Tulius Csesar; neither from the eloquence 
of Webster, or Clay, or Calhoun, or Crittenden, or 
Choate; but, sir, from an American, to the manor 
born, and native to the sod, the gt eat American 
traveller, Daniel Pratt, who says — 

There was a great man and he had a great soul, 
And he said, "Great soul, let us try, try, try, 
Though 't is beyond our reach, we '11 tv 3 to make a 
speech, 

Just to please the Blue Bloods and I, great soul, 

Just to please the Blue Bloods and I." 

Then great man winked his eye, and with thumb to his 

nose, 
Said "Badges, badges, badges we must oppose, 

You and /, great soul, you and I; 
And we '11 tickle up the Blue Bloods and make them 
all say, 
Oh, what a great man am 1, great soul, 
Oh. what a great man am I !" 

Some three years ago, we stood upon this floor 
With our badge upon our breast, great soul. 

You and I— great soul — you and I; 
And to Centre Harbor went, with our badge so promi- 
nent, 
That fair ladies all might see, what a great man we be, 

You and I, great soul, you and I. 

And we took lady fair— lady fair— by the arm, 

Oh heavens ! ! What a charm— but who saw the harm, 

So sly, were you and I— great soul— you and 1. 
And we stepped out, beyond the reach of the boys, 
So careful were we not to make a noise, 

All so sly, were you and X— great soul— yon and I, 

So sly, were you and I— you and I. 

And we never looked so great in our adopted State 
As seemed to be our fate at Centre Harbor Inn, 

Great soul, yuu and I, you and I, 
As our badge, early and late, we kept before the eye 
Of the people near the lake, great soul, you and I, 

You and I, great soul, vou and I. 

But a second dose of that might knock our greatness 

flat, 
As the boys again would follow on our track, 
So, great soul, you and I must try, try, try 
To fight the order still, and we will— yes, we will; 
For if it were to pass it certainly would kill 
You and I, great soul, you and I. 

Mr. Fitzgerald of Ward 7 said— 

Though cheek by jowl 

Went little man and little sowl 
And spoke their little speech to.a tittle 

And the people all declare 

That never yet elsewere 

Did little man and little sowl 
Look so little, little, little. 

Why, sir, are the galleries so crowded tonight? 
Ah, sir, it has been announced during the week 
that the representative of the great American 
people was tonight about to perform one of his 
daring, unexampled, inimitable, acrobatic, ora- 
torical balloon ascensions- and, after firing off 
some popguns at members of the Council, finally 
swoop "down on the head of your humble servant 
from Ward 7 and smother him by his rhetorical 
gas. I almost trembled when I entered this hall, 
but shrank not and was consoled by the reflection 
that the popguns of the gentleman from Ward 5 
are always harmless. I was told, he had prepared 
a little parody — some people are always parodying. 
I know not, sir, who the blue bloods are in this 
chamber ; but if they be those who are op posed to 
extravagance and the gratification of individual 
vanity at the city's expense, I shall be always 
glad to vote with them. It is true I have a badge, 
and every argument which my friend makes 
against me is the best argument "against a badge. 
Why should the city of Boston furnish me with a 
badge to excite my vanity? Why should I be al- 
lowed to go to Centre Hai bor to break the hearts of 
all the ladies by wearing a badge that is procured 
by other people's money ? I am opposed to badges. 
He says he wants them to bequeath to his chil- 
dren so that they shall remember with pride that 
their father once served as a member of the Com- 
mon Council. If he h is no better legacy to leave 
his children than badges purchased by money 
that didn't belong to him, better bury them forty 
feet under ground. The best heritage he can leave 
them will be honesty and uprightness of conduct 



43 



COMMON COUNCIL 



in public life. Why should n't he have some 
heirlooms? I don't object to that; but I 
do object to the city of Boston paying: for 
them. That is what I o ject to. Has 
n't he enough to leave t., bis posterity? 
Just imagine the work which the gentleman from 
Ward 5 has performed. Has n't be those speeches 
which will be read when Demosthenes will be for- 
gotten — and not till then? I say and repeat 
it, that the badge is simply a gratification of the 
vanity of the members of the Council in nine 
cases out of ten. One member asked me why I 
voted with the blue bloods. 1 think my blood is 
as blue as any man's here, and I pride myself 
upon it. I hate this can r, and talk in this cham- 
ber, if a man votes for what is right I shall 
go with him. I don't like to bear this cant at out 
blue blood and ar ; stocracy. We all stand 
here as the peers of each other, and the gentleman 
from Ward 5has a poor appreciation of himselt if he 
thinks there is anybody at this board who is any 
better than he is. I don't. If there are blue bloods 
here, I don't know where they are, and if they 
vote against this expendituie I am glad of it, and 
I am glad to be with them. But I don't see 
why my friend should pitch into me because I 
voted upon that side. I did quote Tom Bloore. and 
I quoted him to suit myself. I don't intend to be 
harsh upon my fiiend because he made that little 
piece of poetiy. I am glad to learn that he is a 
poet as well as an orator.' I was just picturing to 
my mind the last scene when the gentleman from 
Ward 5 sba'l have completed ' hie work. 
Just imagine, sir, our friend fjom Ward 5 lying 
on the bed of death, his mourning con-iituents 
around him, and his children gathered to his side, 
while his only legacy to his clear ones is a few 
badges, which don't belong to him, and those im- 
mortal speeches. I fancy I see him winging his 
flight to that land where he shall deliver no more 
speeches, and write no more parodies, and fight 
no more fights, and where the gods — foremost 
amongst whom shall be Daniel Pratt — 
shall welcome him in the words of the 
author of "English Bards and Scotch Reviewers"— 

Illustrious heroes, all thy foes o'ercome, 
Forever reign— the rival of Tom Thumb. 
Well may the gods in triumph bear thee hence, 
Valiant vanquisher of common sense. 
Fore'er let Webster, Choate and all withdraw, 

Aud give their hallowed bays to George A. ■ . 

Mr. Jaques of Ward 9— As a new member of 
this Council I am very sorry to see the undigni- 
fied and unworthy position in which this body is 
put on such a question. Probably there has been 
no time, certainly not within many years, when 
theie are so many grave questions pressing upon 
the consideration of the Council, in which all the 
citizens of Boston are interested. It seems to me 
that the citizens, reading the debates upon 
this question, roust look with great ap- 
prehension upon this body to whom they have 
entrusted the consideration of these questions. 
The nature of the particular question before us 
tonight, for which no argument has been given, 
and no one has pretended to give one— and 
none can be given— is simply whether we 
want these badges as a child wants a toy. 
And here are seventy-four members chosen as 
the representatives of the people of the city of 
Boston debating in this style upon this que-tion. 
Now, I say it is unworthy of debate. The hollow- 
ness and insincerity of the attempts at argument 
in its favor are apparent. It is put forward as a 
question of sentiment. Now, it seems to me that 
when my children and grandchildren are shed- 
ding tears of gratitude over this memento of the 
fact that their progenitor was a m ember of the 
Council of 1875, I would like to spare them from 
the feeling that their grief or their teai s were in- 
fluenced by the intrinsic value of the memento. 
If we must have a badge an inexpensive one 
would be just as capable of exciting this feeling 
of pride that I was a member of this body as an 
expensive one. I only speak of that to show that 
the whole thing is an appeal to the vanity of the 
members. One of the gentlemen, in speaking at 
the last meeting, undertook to show that as 
special policemen the members of this body had 
no duties. Then what do we want badges for? 
I did n't propose to take up any more of the time 
of the Council, as we are exposing ourselves to 
ridicule the longer we discuss it. But I be- 
seech the Council not to expose themselves to the 
charge of acting like children eager for toys. 
When it is shown that within the last six years 
this body has spent something like $7500 for 
badges, I beseech gentlemen to pause before 
t hey consent to carry on this farce any longer. 



Mr. Harmon of Ward 6— The gentleman seems 
to think this fs an appeal to vanity. It it is so, it 
has been practiced for many years. Membeis of 
the Council have had badges for many years, and 
I can't see why they should be deprived of them 
at this time. The gentleman from Ward 6 has 
provided an amendment, and if he desires not to 
have one it seems to me that common courtesy 
requires that he should not be compelled to have 
one. I do not think we appeal to vanity. The 
new members should have a badge. If any gen- 
tleman has a badge I don't blame him for-oppos- 
ing it. 

Mr. Guild of Waid 6— There are some persons, 
sir, of such obtuse intellectual powers that they 
may suppose that gentlemen are sent to the Bos- 
ton Common Council to legislate for the good of 
the city, to retrench expenses, and appropriate 
moii°y acording to their be t judgment. Of 
course those people are mistaken. Gentlemen are 
not sent theie for that purpose. They go there 
for the purpose of decorating themselves, to walk 
in high places, to have junketings and a good 
time generally at the public expense. I 
think I see the insignia ot office blazing 
from the manly bosoms of those gentle- 
men in the streets of Boston, and we can all see 
how crime will shrink back to its native alleys 
as they pass. The clink of glasses will not be 
heard in any unhallowed pothouse, aud small 
boys will shrink in terror from the creaking of 
their boots. These gentlemen will pass in and 
out of the places of public amusement, recog- 
nized by the star of the city of Boston emblazoned 
upon their bosoms. Aid when they go forth old 
age will forgetits crutch, laboritstask, andmoth- 
ers turning to their daughters say there goes a 
member of the S| ecial police force of Boston. Now 
sir, that may be regarded as looking upon it in 
rather a frivolous manner; but I regard this 
whole movement for badges as an indicating 
straw of what temper the Council is in. I am 
glad it has met with opposition. It shows that 
there is a contest with unlawful expend- 
iture. It is true we saw the badges start- 
ed at $3, and that they have attained the 
price of $15; but had not opposition be^u made, 
perhaps they might have attained the price of 
$1500. I say it is a straw to indicate the financial 
pressure which is to f o.low ; for if gentlemen will 
vote away $15 of the people's money for badges 
for the gratification of their vanity, what will 
they not do with more serious matters? 
And, sir, it is such scenes and wrangles as 
we have witnessed here that fills our halls with 
briefless lawyers and windy orators, and keeps 
worthy men from doing service in the halls of 
legislation. It gives them a disgust for an asso- 
ciation with people of this stamp. Now, sir, 
I shall vote against this in every shape. I 
shall decline a badge if it is voted. I think 
it is beneath the dignity of a Common Council- 
man or an Alderman to act as a special policeman, 
unless some great and pressing emergency shall 
call for their services. Then, sir, as good citizens, 
no matter what their position may be, they will 
be ready to answer the call of the chief officer of 
the city in any capacity and upon any occasion. 

Mr. Power of Ward 22—1 voted against badges 
at the last mee dng, but since then have consid- 
ered the matter a little more. I voted against them 
then on account of the large price. I do not be- 
lieve in spending such a large amountfor a badge. 
But I have come to the conclusion that a cheap 
badge might be useful, and since this amendment 
is passed, so that members will not be required to 
take a bad^e. I shall vote in favor of a cheap 
badge. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5—1 admire the sentiment 
which I find comes from Beacon Hill once again, 
and I refer now to the last speaker from Ward 6 
[Mr. Guild], who states that this is an indicating- 
straw of expenditures. Does the gentleman 
know, and can he state in his seat what the ex- 
penditures of the city of Boston were last year? 
And has he traversed old ocean and not yet learn- 
ed the rudiments of the Common Council? He is 
a most beautiful writer, and he describes his visit 
to Europe, and his passage over old ocean, and I 
have taken a great deal of pleasure in reading- 
it, But when he comes here to this body, 
composed of practical men — as I presume 
he will prove to be after he has learned 
the ludiments of the workings of this great cor- 
poration — does he understand, sir, that $1,300,- 
000 were last year appropriated by a single < om- 
mittee— and that the Committee on Paving -over 
which we have no control? Does he understand, 
sir, that this whole matter of the City Govern- 



FEBRUARY 4, 1875 



44 



inent of Boston, in its action, is based upon 
a wrong principle? Let him strike at 
the principle and not talk about windy orators 
and briefless lawyers. God knows we have 
enough biiefless lawyers here. But be talks 
again— and here let me depart from my first 
point— about some persons here with obtuse 
mental powers. I presume some of us are. 
And he. sir, comes as our greaf' supervi- 
sor, fresh from the shambles, to instruct us who 
have had some experience in city matters. Does 
he know that the city appiopnations last year 
were twelve or thirteen millions of dollars? and 
now he talks about this two-penny expendi- 
ture of a few hundreds. Come down from 
Beacon Hill to the level of the people, and 
understand the wants and sentimei ts of the peo- 
ple. Let him understand that people here know 
something. "Obtuse mental powers" is it? Per- 
haps there are obtuse mental powers. Is he aware 
and does he write it in hi< lit le book? I may be 
excused for being personal, but as the gentleman 
has talked of the mental powers of some persons 
here — 

Mr. Guild of Ward 6—1 rise to correct the gen- 
tleman. 1 made no allusion to the obtuse mental 
powers of any gentleman here. I said there are 
some gentlemen of obtuse intellectual powers who 
suppose that members were sent here to legislate. 
I made no reference to any gentleman in this 
body. 1 beg the gentleman from Ward 5 not to 
spare me, tor I consider it rather an honor to be 
attacked by him. 

Mr. Shaw — I presume the gentleman does, sir, 
and if he goes on in the course he has begun he 
will get enough of it before he gets through. I 
accept his apology. I only ask him when he 
again travel ses old ocean to call upon Colonel 
Henderson, the Chief of Police of London, and 
obtain from him a comparison of the expenses 
and improvements of the two cities, and he will 
ascertain that with all our improvements, 
of which we are so proud, we are but a drop in 
the bucket, and are not to be compared with the 
city of London. Can the gentle. nan tell me how 
many houses have been Duilt in London proper 
and the metropolis both of which are controlled 
by the Lord Mayor as compared with 
the city of Boston? Is tne gentleman 
posted and can he draw the distinction, and if 
so, I would like to have him do it. Talk 
about this expenditure being an indicating 
straw? Why, sir, the gentleman does n't reflect 
for a moment, that when he has travelled abroad, 
and met there members of the City Govern- 
ment- -whether it is so with him, it is with 
hundreds of others — who have taken pleas- 
ure in recognizing the badge which they 
sometimes wear. I havj h't got mine, 
but I wish I had. I have known gentlemen in Eu- 
rope to :-how this little badge and wear it with 
pride, and 1 have known it to be respected in the 
citv of Paris, and my worthy friend upon my ex- 
treme left [Mr. Kimball] may talk about badges 
being seen in certain places witn dishonor to the 
wearer — 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6 — 1 rise to correct the 
gentleman. I didn't say that the badges were 
worn in places with dishonor to the wearer. 

Mr. Shaw— I beg the gei. tleman's pardon. I un- 



derstood him to say that he had understood that 
certain badges had been seen in di reputable 
places. I think I am right. I may be wrong. I 
desire that the Council, and those of the pe >ple 
who read our reports, mav see that there are 
members of the City Governmeet who have braias 
and experience, and are not to be taught by a 
fledgling. 

Mr. Peabody of Ward 9 moved the pievious 
question and it was ordered. 

The amendment of Mr. Kimball to fix the price 
at $10.50 was lost. 

Mr. Cio ker changed bis amendment from $6 to 
$5.50, and called for the yeas and nays which were 
ordered — 14 for, 44 against. The amendment was 
lost— yeas 22, nays 44. 

Yeas— Messrs. Brackett, Burditt, Burgess, Cawley, 
Crorker, Curtis, Cushing, Day, Fitzgerald, Gold- 
thwait, Kelley. Kimball, Loring, New-ton, Pea- 
body, Power, Smith, Sprague, Stacey, Wads- 
worth. Whitmore— 22. 

Nays — Messrs. Anderson, Barry, Beal, Bent, 
Clarke, Coyle, Cushman, Damon, Devereux, Dug- 
gan, Edwards, Fitzpatrick,Flynn, Guild, Harmon, 
Harrigan, Hicks, Hiscock, Jaques, Kingsbury, 
Leighton, Long, Mooney, Morrison, Murray, 
Noyes, Page, Perkins, Pierce, Rice, Sampson, 
Shaw, Sibley, S weetsei , Thacber, Trait ,Walbridge, 
Walsh, Whitcomb, Wilbur, Willcutt, Wilson, 
Woo Is— 43. 

On motion of Mr. Kimball, the yeas and nays 
jvere ordered on the passage of the order as 
amended, and it was defeated— yeas 31, nays 35: 

Yeas — Messrs. Anderson, Barry, Bent, Clarke, 
Coyle, Cushman, Damon, Devereux, Duggan, 
Edwards, Fitzpatrick, Flycn, Harmon, Harrigan 
Hicks, Kelley, Kingslev, Leighton, Mooney, Mur- 
ray, Noyes, Osborne, Rice. Shaw, Sibley, Train, 
Waloridge, Walsh, Whitcomb, Wilbur, Woods— 
31. 

Nays — Messrs. Beal, Brackett, Burditt, Burgess, 
Cawley. Crocker, Curtis. Cushing, Day, Fitzger- 
ald. Goldthwait. Guild, Hiscock, Jaques, Kimball, 
Long, Loring, Morrison, Newton, Page, Parker, 
Peabody, Perkins, Pierce, Power, Sampson, Smith, 
Sprague, Stacey, Swf etser, Thacher, Wadsworth, 
Whitmore, Willcutt, Wilson— 35. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 16 moved a reconsidera- 
tion of lie last vote, hoping it would not prevail. 

Mr. Flvnn of Ward 7 moved that the motion to 
reconsider be specially assigned to 8% P. M. next 
Thursday evening. 

A c ill tor the yeas and nays by Mr. Kimball was 
lost— 8 for, 48 against. 

Mr. Noyes of Ward 5 moved that the Council 
ad]' our n, but at the suggestion of the I'resident 
withheld the motion to allow the introduction of 
the following order by Mr. Hiscock of Ward 14, 
from the Joint Committee on Armories: 

Ordered, That there be allowed and paid to Cap- 
tain Theodore L. Harlow, commanding Company 
C, Fourth Battalion of Infantry, M. V. M., the 
sum of $65; said sum being the amount of rent 
for a temporary armorv for said company from 
June 30, 1874, to Sc.pt. 24. 1874, and to be charged 
to the appropriation for Armories. 

Read once and laid over. 

On motion of Mr. Noyes of Ward 5 the Council 
adjourned. 



-15 



BOARD OF ABDERMKN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY 8, 1875. 



Regular weekly meeting at four o'clock P. M., 
Alderman Clark, Chairman, presiding. 

JURORS DRAWN. 

Thirty -six traverse jurors were drawn for the 
January term of the Superior Court, second ses- 
sion ; sixty-nine traverse jurors for the Supreme 
Judicial Court, February term ; and forty traverse 
jurors for the Superior Court, January term, 
first session. 

THE HORSE-CAR BLOCKADE 

The following was received and read: 

Executive Department, City Hall, ) 
Boston, Feb. 8, 1875. J 

To the Board of Aldermen : Gentlemen— The ex- 
cessive use of certaiu streets by horse-railroad 
cars has obstructed public travel to such an ex- 
tent that I df:em it my duty to call your attention 
to the subject, and 1 ask that measures be taken 
as early as practicable to secure a change in tne 
system of operating the street railways in the 
most frequented portions of the city, so as to ac- 
commodate the public travel and not interfere 
with the transaction of business. 

I am aware that, owing to the condition of our 
streets, it would be difficult, perhaps impossible, 
to regulate their use in such a manner as to give 
entire satisfaction to the various paities interest- 
ed, but it cannot be a difficult matter if the sub- 
ject is approached in a proper spirit to devise a 
plan which will meet the reasonable demands of 
the travelling public. Under the present ar- 
rangements neither the railroad companies nor 
the persons who ride in their cars are accommo- 
dated. 

It appears fi om information procured by the 
police on Saturday, the 6th inst., that the number 
of cars running both ways on Tremont street, 
betweeri Boylston street and the Tremont House, 
from six o clock A. M. to seven o'clock P. M., was 
2848— an average of 219 each riour. The number 
running on Washington street, between Boylston 
street and Temple place, during the same hours, 
was 1139— an average of eighty -seven each hour. 

In order to accommodate othervehicles and foot 
travellers it is necessary to preserve a ceitain dis- 
tance between the cars, and the recent enforce- 
ment of the regulation upon that point — which 
was demand- d in the interests of the public safe- 
ty — has resulted in blocking: the cars in some in- 
stances for a distance of over a mile, and causing 
great delay at thos^ times in the diy when the 
people who use the cars are the most seriously 
jnconven enced by it 

If the powers now conferred on your Board are 
mot sufficient to secure the enforcement of proper 
regulations for the use of the streets, I trust tnere 
will be no delay in applying to the Legislature for 
such additional power as may be found necessaiy. 
Samuel C. Cobb, Mayor. 

Alderman Prescott— I, for one, feci ihankful 
that his Honor the Mayor has seen fit to bring 
this matter before the Board. I believe that the 
Committte on Paving have now before them, 
among the unfinished busines* of last year, the 
plan proposed by the Alderman from Wa"d 
8 [Alderman Stebbins], for relieving the blocks 
which occnr on our principal thoroughfares, Tre- 
mont and Washington streets; but so great have 
the Obstructions become within the last few days 
that it seems to me that it is a matter that should 
immediately be taken in hand, and I trust they 
will be able to report to this Board at our next 
meeting. I have had an opportunity during the 
past week to see something of the blocks on Tre- 
mont and Washington streets, and two or three 
evenings there has been a continuous line of 
cars from Scollay's square through Tremont 
street, Temple place, Washington street, as 
far as Williams Market. There were from 
seventy-five to 100 cars in line, and it was next to 
id-possible for them to move except at a snail's 
pace, between the hours of five and seven o'clock 
P. M. I was informed on Saturday last, by one of 
the employes of the Metropolitan Railroad, that 
it took two hours and live minutes on the evening 
previous for a car to pass between Lenox street 
and Scollay's square, when the usual running- 



time is twenty to twenty-five minutes. Members 
of the Board can see by this that *t amounts to a 
virtual blockade of the two principal thorough- 
fares of our cit/, when a large number of people 
wish to get from one section of the city to another. 
I move that the communication be referred to the 
Committee on Paving, trusting that they will re- 
port at an early day some feasible plan remedy- 
ing the present discred-'table state of affairs in the 
very heart of our city. 
The motion prevailed. 

orders of notice. 
The petitions of Adolphus J. Carter et al., for 
removal of a tree at corner of Main and Henley 
streets, Charlestown; of heirs of Solomon Wildes 
and Fifty Associates, for leave to locate steam 
engines on Washington-street extension, were 
severally considered on orders of notice, and no 
one appearing to object, the first was recommitted 
to the Committee on Common on the part of the 
- Board, and the last two were referred to the Com- 
mittee on Steam Engines. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Committee on Paving. S. & D. Rich- 
ards, for leave to move two wooden buildings 
from Garden court to Foss street, Charlestown. 

To the Joint Committee on Claims. Mary S. 
Everett, claiming dower in »a certain estate con- 
veyed to town of Brighton July 13, 1872. 

To the Joint Committee on Armories. Com- 
pany A, Ninth Infantry, for additional furniture 
for their armony. 

To the Joint Committee on Survey and Inspec- 
tion of Buildings. J. Arthur Peck, for leave to 
erect a wooden building on Boston & Lowell and 
Nashua & Lowell Railroad quay, No. 21 Charles- 
town street. 

To the Committee on Lamps. I. G. Whitney et 
al. and John E. Blakemore et. al., for a more gen- 
eral and systematic lighting of the westerly part 
of Ward 17. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order to allow the Superintendent of Lamps to 
purchase during this municipal year, with the ap- 
proval of the committee on that department, such 
lanterns, lamp posts, brackets and other materials, 
and to provide such labor in said department, as 
may be found necessary. Passed. 

Order for the Committee on Lamps to contract 
with the Brookline Gaslight Company to supply 
the sections of this city traversed by their pipes 
with gas at the rate of three dollars per 1000 feet, 
from Feb. 15, instant. 

Aldeiman Worthington — I would like to ask 
the Committee on Lamps if three dollars is a fair 
price. I think we contract with the Charle-town 
and other suburban gas companies for gas at 
$2.75 per 1000 feet, and it seems to me that three 
dollars is a large price to pay in a place like 
Brookline. I hope we sh^ll have some explana- 
tion from the Committee on Lamps. 

Alderman Stebbins— The contract of the citv of 
Boston with the Brookline Gas Company termi- 
nated in August last. The company asked that it 
might be renewed, the city to pay an additional 
price for the gas furnished. It was not acted 
on either by the last City Council or the Commit- 
tee on Lamps, and it went over as unfinished busi- 
ness. The Committee on Lamps of the present 
year have investigated the matter very 
thoroughly, and find, according to representation's 
made to tbem by the officers of the Brookline Gas 
Company, that the cost of the gas was $3.09 per 
thousand feet. The company offered to contract 
with the city for $3 per thousand feet, the same 
as is paid to the West Roxbury and Dorchester 
gas companies, which are situated, with regard to 
consumers and the length of pipes, about the 
same as the Brookline Gas Company. It should be 
borne in mind that the Brookline Gas Company 
is not within the city limits, and consequently 'we 
have not, perhaps, the control over them which 
we have over companies located within the boun- 
daries of the city. The contract with the Charles- 
town Company is at a much lsss rate, but their 
number of consumers is of course largely in ex- 
cess of those of the companies located in the 
suburban wards of the city. The Brookline Com- 
pany manufactures about 24,000,000 feet of gas per 
year, of which 4,000,000 are supplied to private 
consumers at $4 per thousand, and 10,000,000 for 
$2.75 per thousand to the city for lighting the 
street lamps — in Brighton principally. Heretofore 
the price has been $2.75 per thousand cubic 
feet. The committee have examined the matter 
thoroughly and come to the conclusion that $3 



FEBRUARY 8, 1875. 



46 



was a fair price and what the city should pay. 
The petition was for the .city to pay that price 
from August last, but the committee of the pres- 
ent year thought they should not go back of the 
allowance for the present year. 

Alderman Worthington — I think it is hardly a 
time now for the city of Boston to commence pay- 
ing an increased price for gas. During the last 
year, the old members will remember, we had 
hearings on this subject, and it was proved that 
gas could be made at a less price than what we 
pay some of the out-of-town companies; and now, 
instead of a reduced price, there is an application 
for an increase. I think that if the Brookline Gas 
Company have heretofore been supplying the city 
of Boston for 82.75, we ought to adhere to that 
now and not increase the price. Certainly the 
materia] used for manufacturing gas can be pur- 
chased now for less than when that contract was 
originally made. If they could aftord to manufac- 
ture and sell it to the city then for $2.75, they cer- 
tainly can now. I tbink,"theiefore,that we should 
adhere to the original price, and I move to amend 
by striking out" $3" and inserting in its place 

$2.75." 

Alderman Stehbins— I have no objection what- 
ever; but the result will be that our supply of gas 
will be. shut off from the streets in the Brighton 
District. 

Alderman Burrage— 1 understood that the origi- 
nal agreeraenD was that the Brookline company 
should furnish gas to the city at the same price 
thatlhe Doichester company did. At that time 
the price was $2.75 ; since then the city has agreed 
to pay the Dorchester company $3. It wasiu evi- 
dence that this gas cost $3.09, and that without 
reckoning the interest on real estate. Of course 
the Aldermen will see that gas cannot be manu- 
factured and distributed as cheaply in Bicokline 
as in Boston, where the length of pipe i? very 
much larger in proportion to the number of con- 
sumers. 

Alderman Worthington — As Ilook at the mat- 
ter, it would not be a very serious thing for the 
city of Boston if the Brookline Gas Company 
should cut off i he gas in Bright n; We certainly 
can supply lights there by open fluid lamps, at a 
very much less price than we can by burning gas, 
at the present low price of oil. It can be supplied 
for about $2, a great deal less than the cost ot gas, 
and I think the light is nearly as good. I do not 
believe the Brookline company will stop the sup- 
ply on this account, and I think it is well for us to 
make a test of it. 

Alderman Power — It seems to rue that it has 
taken the Brookline Gas Company a long time to 
find out what it costs to make gas; if it has just 
ascertained that it costs $3 this year, it is likely 
that it will come to grief soon, for it has 
been furnishing gas for $2.75, when the price 
of everything required to make gas was higher 
than it is now, and they have just asked us to 
raise the price. That seems to me to be a ridicu- 
lous state of things. I have not any doubt that, if 
this Government adheres ! o the old price, we will 
get the gas. I have not any doubt but that the 
company can afford it. I do not believe the • 
Biookliue G?aS Company has been furnishing gas 
to the city at twenty-five cents less than cost. I 
hope the amendment will prevail. 

Alderman Stebbms — The agreement with the 
Brookiine Gas Company was made by the town of 
Brighton for $2.75 per thousand feet, but there 
was an arrangement made as to the houts of 
lighting the street lamps — being lighted later and 
put out earlier at certain seasons — by which a less 
quantity was consumed, so that while the price is 
$2.75, it amounts to about the same as has been 
paid to the Dorchester and West Roxbury gas- 
light companies. 

Alderman Worthington — Does the Alderman 
mean to say that the town of Brighton paid for 
gas that they did not use? 

Alderman Stehbins — No, sir. 

Alderman Worthington — I should judge by what 
he says that they were put out at an early hour. 
I think that is paying for gas they do not re- 
ceive. I believe they knew ezactly what they 
were burning, and that the contract was made at 
so much per thousand feet, and if such a contract 
was maae with the town of Biighton it can be 
with the city of Boston; and I know of no reason 
why we should depart from it. 

Alderman Prescott— I would like to ask the 
chairman of the Committee on Lamps what is 
the relative cost ot gas and fluid lamps. 

Alderman Stehbins— I think the relative cost is 
about one-half, in favor of the fluid lamp. 



Alderman Burrage — About twenty cents and 
forty cents. 

The amendment was adopted — 6 for, 4 against— 
aad the order as amended was passed. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petition of Patrick Sharkey and M. P. Wilder et 
al. Referred. 

Offer from the proprietors of the West Roxbury 
Fi ee Libi ary to transfer said library to the city of 
Boston, on conditions therein specified. Referred 
to the Committee on the Public Library. 

An offer from the Flax Pond Water Company to 
supply East Boston with pure water came up 
referred to Joint Committee on Water. 

Alderman Stehbins — It piobably escaped the at- 
tention of the members of the other branch of the 
City Council that a similar petition was before 
the Government last year and received a very 
thorough investigation. The ciry authorized a 
survey of these ponds to be made at the large ex- 
pense of some $2000, and the report of the City 
Engineer was entirely adverse to the claims of the 
parties who own these ponds. They claimed that 
there was a supply of 6,000,000 gallons per day; the 
result of the Engineer's investigations established 
the fact that there were only 2,000,000 to be de- 
pended upon in a year of drought. The result 
was that the committee reported that it was inex- 
pedient to take any action in the premises. Now, 
it seems to me hardly worth while to take up the 
time of the Engineer, the Water Board or the 
Committee on Water in investigating what has 
been established so thoroughly by the last Board, 
and I therefore move that the communication be 
placed upon the files of this Board. 

The motion prevailed. 

Reports ot committees nominating Robert W. 
Hall as Superintendent of Public Lands; William 
H. Bradley as Superintendent of Sewers ; Joseph 
P. Davis as City Engineer ; John Galvin as Super- 
intendent of the Common, etc.; Frank L. Tiles- 
ton as Commissioner on Cedar Grove Cemetery; 
John P. Healy as Ci ty Solicitor ; William F. Davis as 
Water Registrar; Charles Harris as Superintend- 
ent of Streets; John T. Gardner as Harbor Mas- 
ter; James C. Tucker as Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Buildings; Thomas W. Davis as City Surveyor. 
Severally accepted. 

Certificate of election of Amos L. Noyes as a 
member of the Cochituate Water Board, in place 
of Uriel H. Crocker, chosen by this branch. The 
Boa>d proceeded to ballot. Aldermen Bigelow 
and Viles collected and counted the votes, and 
they reported — 

Whole number of votes 11 

Necessary to a choice y 

Uriel H. Crocker had 9 

Amos L. Noyes had 2 

And Mr. Crocker was declared elected in non- 
concurrence. Certificate sent down. 

Order authorizing the Treasurer to pay Francis 
A. Hall three city of Boston gold coupons, of $25 
each, alleged to have been burned, on the condi- 
tions set forth in said order. Passed. 

Report and order authorizing a transfer of $500 
from the appropriation for Incidental Expenses 
to that for Contingent Fund of the Common Coun- 
cil. Passed — yeas 11, nays 0. 

Order for flags to be displayed and a national 
salute to be fired at East and South Boston, the 
city proper, the Highlands, Dorchester, West Rox- 
bury, Brighton and Chafestown, at noon on the 
22dinst.,m commemoration of the birthday of 
Washington. 

Alderman Woithingtou — I move to amend the 
order by inserting the words "provided, that the 
salute in the city proper may be omitted at the 
discretion of the Mayor." Last Fourth of July a 
large number remonstrated against the firing of 
cannon, because of sickness, and I think the firing 
on the Common was deemed inexpedient. It 
seems to me that it can be left to the discretion of 
the Mayor, and if serious objection is made the 
salute can be omitted. 

The amendment was adoptee', and the order as 
amended passed. Sent down. 

BOND APPROVED. 

The bond of Denis A. Sullivan, constable, being- 
presented duly ceitified, was approved. 

COMMUNICATIONS FROM CITY OFFICERS. 

Superintendent of North Scales. Report for 
quarter ending; Feb. 1— Received $687.25, of which 
$138.75 have been paid into the treasury. Sent 
down. 

Overseers of the Poor. Report for quarter end- 
ing Jan. 31— Cash on hand Oct. 1, $5294.67; receipts 



47 



BOARD OF AJLDEJtMEN, 



during quarter, $32,170.14; expended, $28,810.48. 
Sent down. 

Resignation. Communication from Charles 
Erskiue, resigning the office of Inspector in Ward 
13. Placed on file. 

Fire Commissio?iers. Report of fires and alarms 
for January. Sent down. 

Auditor of Accounts. Monthly exhibit for Feb. 
4 (City Doc. No. 21). Following is the state of the 
appropriations: 

Appropriations, 

Revenues, etc. Expended. Unexpended. 
General.... 113,967,800.76 $10,363,629.53 $3,604,171.23 

Special 5,018,166.89 2,078,488.41 2,939,678.48 



$18,985,967.65 
Sent clown. 



$12,442,117.94 



1,543,849.74 



EAST CAMBRIDGE OMNIBUS ROUTE. 

On motion of Alderman Bigelow, the Board 
proceeded to consider the special assignment, viz., 
hearing on petition of John C. Stiles for an al- 
teration of the route prescribed for the East Cam- 
bridge Omnibus Line in this city. 

Mr. Linus M. Child, counstl for Mr. Stiles, sub- 
mitted a map of the loute, and explained the route 
first taken, as Mr. Stiles supposed he had a right 
to do. After be had established the line an order 
was passed by the last Board prescribing 
the present route. It bad been urged that the 
narrowness of Court street prevented the line to 
East Cambridge; there are very few passengers 
taken by the present route. Mr. Stiles asks only 
to run an omnibus through Court street once in 
fifteen minutes. 

Mr. Child called Mr. Wellington, a resrdent of 
East Cambridge for twenty years, who said 
the people desired to be carried to Summer street 
and they would be satisfied >f a line of coaches is 
allowed to run. They would not be accommo- 
dated on theii outward trips by the present route, 
via Wall street, though it would answer very well 
on the inward trip. Since Washington street has 
been extended there has been no great block in 
Court street. 

To Mr. H. W. Muzzey, eouisel for the Union 
Railroad, Mr. Wellington said he had loaned 
money to Mr. Stiles, with a Mr. Saunders; but he 
had ample security for that, which consisted of 
tip carts, harnesses, team wagons, horses (some 
of which are used on the omnibus line and others 
for general teaming business); witness had no 
personal knowledge that Mr. atiles had horses 
that were not uaed in the coaches, except one 
which he [Mr. Wellington] borrowed last week. 

Mr. Child objected that the matter was pressed 
further than the Board might care to hear, and 
Mr. Muzzey said he had shown the pecuniary re- 
lations between Mr. Stiles and Mr. Wellington 
and he would desist. 

Mr. Magoun, called by Mr. Child, corroborated 
the statements of Mr. Wellington in regard to the 
desire for better communication between East 
Cambridge and Boston; he believed no obstruc- 
tions would result from the omnibuses in East 
Cambridge. To Mr. Muzzey Mr. Magoun said 
that people working in the city would be more 
convenienced by the old route than the present 
one. To Mr. Child he said people generally start- 
ed in the direction of their homes and aim at the 
most convenient place to take the coach. 

Mr. Atwood, called by Mr. Child, said he 
lived in East Cambridge and did business in 
Chauncy street, and there is a strong desire in 
East Cambridge for better accommodations, and 
was proceeding to state his reasons, when Mr. 
Muzzey objected that a witness should net act as 
counsel, but the Chairman ruled that the witnsss 
had a perfect right to give his reasons in his own 
words. 

Mr. Atwood believed the Cambridge Horse Rail- 
road Company was pushing Mr. Stiles and trying 
to prevent him from having a route that would 
ultimately be remunerative, and better accommo- 
date the East Cambridge people. At present, on 
their return trips they do not carry so many pas- 
sengers as they drd when they ran the other way. 
It was his impression that the Union Railway had 
increased its cars since the omnibuses began. 

To Mr. Muzzey, Mr. Atwood stated that the 
omnibuses ran from 7 A. M. to 8 P. M., while the 
cars ran from 6 A. M. to 12 P. M. 

Mr. Bryant, called by Mr. Child, said the omni- 
buses were and would be a great convenience to 
members of the bar who have business at the 
East Cambridge Court House, especially if they 
ran through Court street. The necessity for such 
a line is very great, and the omnibuses would not 



add to the blocks in Court street. To Mr. Collins, 
counsel for the Union Railway, Mr. Bryant said 
he thought an omnibus in ten minutes would not 
cause a block in Court stieet, though perhaps one 
in five would. He should prefer to have the horse 
cars extended farther into the city, if that is 
practicable. He thought the indebtedness of the 
public to a public carrier depends upon the pa- 
tronage he receives, and if, unon the whole, a car- 
rier cannot make fair pay, he ought not to be 
required to run after 8 P. M. 

Mr. Dudley of Old Cambridge, called by Mr. 
Child, agreed with Mr. Bryant's statements in 
regard to the wants of lawyers doing busiuess on 
or near Court street and having business in East 
Cambridge, as well as of persons going from the 
depots to that point. To Mr. Muzzey, Mr. Dudley 
sard he had been employed by Mr. Stiles as coun- 
sel in several cases. 

Mr. Muzzey was about to ask in regard to Mr. 
Sciles's affairs, when Mr. Child said he would 
spare him that trouble and state that Mr. Stiles is 
embarrassed, and would be more so if he did not 
get this petition granted. 

Mr. BarJett, a resident of South Boston, called 
by Mr. Childs, said it was a gfeat convenience 
for him to step out of his office in Niles Block and 
take an omnibus to East Cambridge, when he 
wanted to go there to search the records or attend 
the courts. 

To Mr. Collins, Mr. Bartlett said he preferred 
cars to coaches, though not when the cars ran on 
four-horse time. He wanted the opportunity to 
leave his office and strike a coach, raiher than to 
always have to walktoBowdoin square. He wished 
all the conveniences for transportation it was pos- 
sible to have. To Mr. Child, he said he never 
knew cars to run to East Cambridge once in four 
or five minutes. 

Mr. Dyer of Roxbury, who does business at 37 
and 41 Court stieet, New England News Company, 
(called by Mr. Child) said be did not believe an 
omnibus in fifteen minutes would greatly ob- 
struct travel in Court street. To Mr. Collins — His 
attention had not been called to blocks in Court 
street lately. 

The petitioner here rested his case, reserving 
the right to add rebutting evidence. 

Mr. Collins insisted that the petitioner should 
complete his evidence, and Mr. Muzzey desired 
that the petitioner should not be allow ed to intro- 
duce cumulative evidence, and the Chairman 
ruled that as the case of the petitioner was closed, 
he could not be allowed to introduce more evi- 
dence except in reply to what shall be introduced 
by the remonstrants. 

Mr. Collins cited the previous action of Mr. 
Stiles in starting his line without authority of the 
Board, also the reports on the subject from the 
Committee on Licenses. TheUnion Railway had not 
opposed Mr. Stiles; they had let the Committee 
on Licenses consider the merits of the case; and 
they would not appear now but for the fact that 
there is an appeal from the decision of a com- 
mittee of the Board, and an attempt was made to 
bolster up the falling fortunes of ore who is ad- 
mitted by his counsel to be in embarrassed cir- 
cumstances. The Union Railway is ready to run 
cars to any section of Boston when a public exi- 
gency requires it. Mr. Stiles, with half a dozen, 
coaches, does not pretend to meet the public 
want; he is merely running his omnibuses from a 
particular section, and taking a slice of the profits 
from the hard earnings of the Union Railway. 
He should be required to run his coaches at all 
times. 

Mr. Knowlton S. Chaffee, President of the Union 
Railway, said to Mr. Muzzey that Mr. Stiles began 
in November last running over the route asked 
for till early in January, and for a month or six 
weeks he h^s been -running over his present route. 
Mr. Stiles was formerly "superintendent of the 
Union Railway, resigned and was presented with 
$1000, and two directors subsequently assisted 
him to obtain $2000 to purchase horses with. No 
one connected with the railroad had attempted to 
do anything against Mr. Stiles; they had not ap- 
peared before any committees, and he had only a 
slight conversation with one Alderman. The 
reason he came today was that Mr. Stiles had 
made a .sort of challenge in refusing to- 
stand by the action of the committee. Mr. 
Stiles had stopped his omnibuses in front 
of the railroad depot in Bowdoin square, 
and filled it with passengers from the depot, 
ofteu standing on their track and ciosswalks. The 
railroad had no objection to Mr. Stiles going by 
the route agreed upon by the committee. He be- 



FEBRUARY 8, 1875. 



48 



lieved there are serious objections to an omnibus 
line on Tremont and "Washington streets. If a 
line is run at all it should be by a responsible par- 
ty, and he instanced a case where one of Mr. 
Stiles's omnibus poles ran through the rear door 
of a car, though fortunately no one was hurt. If 
the Board think it expedient the company will be 
happy to run their cats farther into the city. 
Theie is a car every ten minutes from East Cam- 
bridge independent of those cars that start from 
Eighth street, where Mr. Stiles's omnibuses 
start from ; then the Eighth-street cars come 
in between the others, which make four- 
teen cars an hour from Eighth street, from 
7 A. M. to 10 P. M.; from 4 to V/ 2 P. M. there 
are sixteen an hour, and from 6 to 6% P. M. 
there are twelve cars in half an hour, and they are 
run exactly on time unless the draw is off. Then 
on the other side, within a quarter of a mile theie 
is a car every fifteen minutes to Somerville. As 
fast as the judgment of the Board of Aldermen 
has allowed, they have got as near the centre of 
business as they could. They carry over 8,000,000 
passengers annually. He had kept a man on each 
bridge to look after the road's interests, and the 
man on Cragie Bridge had counted the passengers 
in each coach, and Mr. Chaffee said Mr. Stiles's pas- 
sengers had not varied two passengers a trip since 
they had changed the route by order of the Board 
of Aldermen. The road had paved the streets 
between the tails, spending nearly $10,000 last 
year. "While Cragie Bridge was undergoing re- 
pairs, the road built an entirely new track at more 
than $20,000 expense, which is not now use,d. 

To Mr. Child, Mr. Chaffee said the passengers 
on the liast Cambridge cars had decreased since 
the holidays, and Mr. Stiles's decrease of passen- 
gers was not owing to the change of route so much 
as to the natural falling off of travel. He had no 
objections to the omnibuses running in the streets 
if the Board think it expedient. 

Mr. Child was proceeding to question Mr. 
Chaffee in regard to the cost of the track in Cam- 
bridge, and the Chairman ruled that it was not 
pertine t to the iuquiry. 

Mr. F. T. Stevens, Treasurer and Clerk of the 
Union Railway, identified the returns of passen- 
gers, previously referred to, earned by Xviv. Stiles. 
They are given accurately every day. They have 
the figures of trips both ways. 

This closed the testimony for the company. 

Alderman Bigelow said the committee had 
heard the evidence of certain police officers whom 
be would call. 

Cnief of Police Savage said the present condi- 
tion of Court street is very much crowded be- 
tween Court square and Washington stieet. The 
greatest objection exists there; blocks are fre- 
quent during the business part ©f the clay. He 
eould hardly see how the omnibuses could be ac- 
commodated there. To Mr. Child, he said he 
stated partly from his own observation and part- 
ly from reports and complaints. He saw a block 
in Court street this afternoon. He believed that 
an omnibus in fifteen minutes would make some 
difference during the business part of the day. 
Mr. Sliles stated the other day to the witness that 
he wanted to run an omnibus once in 7% minutes. 

Captain Vinal of Police Station 2 said chat be- 
tween Washington street and Court square there 
are at present enough teams on Court street. 
Hardly a day passes without blocks, and this line 
©f omnibuses wjuldhelpto increase the incon- 
veniences. He had to send an officer to Court 
street to clear the blocks almost every day. Many 
had complained or said that they left their horses 
inPemaerton square because of the crowd in 
Court street. To Mr. Child, Captain Vinal said he 
had seen blocks all the way from Washington 
street to Court square. The policeman who stands 
on the corner had testified before the committee 
that an omnibus in fifteen minutes would make 
no perceptible difference. To Alderman Stebbins, 
he said an extra officer was put on Court street on 
account of the blocks. To Mi . Child he said he 
thought there had been some change since the 
extension of Washington street. 

Mr. Joan C. Stiles, the petitioner, called by Mr. 
Child, said that now they carry out about half 
the passengers that they did when they ran the 
other way. A week ago iast Saturday they kept 
eount of the passengers ; 817 were brought in and 
370 were carried out; on the following Monday 
they brought in 740 and carried out 317. To Mr. 
Muzzey, Mr. Stiles said the returns were made by 
the drivers on those particular days. 

This closed the testimony. 

Mr. Muzzey said they had not come to oppose 



Mr. Stiles's petition ; they had not appeared be- 
fore a committee, or spoken to a member of the 
Board— their hands are clean, as all the Board 
kuow. They had at length intervened for the 
sake of their passengers, and were readj , when 
the Board deems that it is demanded by a public 
exigency, to extend their tracks farther into 
the city of Boston, and they had a petition 
for it in their pockets. They did object 
to Mr. Stiles standing upon their tracks and pick- 
ing up passengers who had come to their house 
for shelter, as has been testified by Mr. Chaffee. 
There has been no complaint from East Cambridge. 
This is n o public exigen cy ; i t is a private exi gency ; 
the project is to run six omnibuses from 7 A. M. 
to 8 P. M. "What is to be done with those who 
want to leave either point before those hours? 
He dees not add to the interest of the public 
travel. Mr. Muzzey urged that it was important 
that a public carrier should be pecuniarily re- 
sponsible, ana that one not so shoukl not be put 
in competition with one who is. There had not 
been any demand for this by the most eminent 
and respectable citizens of East Cambridge. 

Mr. Child alluded to the anomalous position of 
the railway coinpacy in this matter, and then as- 
sured the Board that the omnibuses would not stop 
before the ctepot door again. The fair and only 
question to be considered is whether Mr. Stiles's 
omnibuses are gong to do any damage to the 
travel of the city of Boston. At the time Mr. 
Stiles commenced he had a perfect right to go 
where he pleased, and could do so until his route 
was prescribed. Mr. Stiles had endeavored to ac- 
commodate the people. It was a settled fact that 
people from out of town desire to get to 
Washington street, and he said he had only 
introduced a lew witnesses to call to the 
attention of the Board what was pat- 
ent to all. He did not claim that there was a pub- 
lic exigency. Mr. Stiles was simply endeavoiing 
to accommodate the people in East Gambiidge. 
His request is reasonable. Any man who brings peo- 
ple into Boston should be encouraged, and there 
ought not to be any frivolous opposition to such 
a public accommodation. The only real objection 
is the crowded state of Court street, ana the police 
officers did not say that it would make any seiious 
difference. A man who puts his money into such 
an enterprise should not be put down because one 
street happens to be crowded. They only asked 
what their patrons desire, and that is a reasonable 
and proper route, such as is prescribed by law. 

On motion of Alderman Harris, the report (rec- 
ommending leave to withdraw) was laid on the 
table. Subsequently, on motion of Alderman 
Worthington, the report was taken from the table 
and accepted. 

CAMBRIDGE BRIDGES. 

The aniiual report of the Commissioner on 
Bridges between Boston and Cambridge [City Doc. 
STo. 23] was received and sent down. 

The draw of West Boston Bridge has been 
opened 1423 times during the year, and that of 
Cr&.gie's Bridge 3930. The expense of maintaining 
and repairing the two bridges has been $79,872.44, 
including $72,474.69 for ' rebuilding Cragie's 
Bridge. 

FINANCE. 

The chairman for the Finance Committee, to 
whom were referred the petitions of John T. Gil- 
son and the trustees of Charlestown Poor Fund, 
the request of Joint Committee on Public Build- 
ings for additional appropriation for police sta- 
tion in Ward 16, and who were requested to report 
an order providing the means for the extension of 
Swett street, submitted reports with orders as fol- 
lows: 

Ordered, That the Auditor of Accounts be and 
he hereby is authorized to transfer from the ap- 
propriation for Police Station House, South Bos- 
ton, to that for Police Station House, Ward 16, the 
sum of $2000. 

Read twice and passed—yeas 11, nays 0. 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer pay on the 
certificate of indebtedness given by the late 
City Treasurer of Charlestown, belonging to the 
"Pierce Fuel Fund," dated Jan. 1, 1874, for $1500, 
the sum of $90, being the interest due said fund 
from Sept. 1, 1872, to Sept. 1, 1873, from the Inter- 
est appropriation. 

Read twice and passed. 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer be and he is 
hereby authorized to borrow, under theVlirection 
of the Committee on Finance, the sum of $476,000, 
for the purpose of widening, extendingand build- 
ing Swett street from Albany street to Dorchester 



49 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



avenue, in accordance with the estimates of the 
Street Commissioners and the City Engineer, to 
be styled 'Street Improvement Loan, Swett 
street." 

Read twice and passed — yeas 10, nays 1 — Alder- 
man Prescott voting nay. 

Whereas, John Orison on the 7th of August, 
1874, paid to the City Treasurer of the city of 
Boston the sum of $4000 for a City of Boston six 
per cent, currency bond, payable July 1, 1894, in- 
terest thereon to be paid semi-annually, a receipt 
being given therefor in the usual form, signed by 
F. U. Tracy, City Treasurer, by the terms of 
which receipt a registered certificate of indebted- 
ness for $4000 was to be delivered to said John 
Gilson upon his presenting said receipt, which 
receipt he now alleges in his petition has been 
lost, it is hereby 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer be and he 
hereby is authorized to issue to John Giison the 
certificate of indebtedness for $4000, as set forth 
in the foregoing preamble, upon satisfactory 
proof of the loss of the receipt for the same, and 
upon his giving a bond satisfactory to the City 
Solicitor and Citv Treasurer to indemnify and 
save harmless the city of Boston from any claim 
based on said original receipt. 

Read twice and passed. 

Seveially sent down. 

THE SALABY BILL. 

Alderman Stebbius submittPd the following: 
The Committee on Salaries beg leave to submit 
herewith, in accordance with the third section of 
the joint rules of the City Council, orders estab- 
lishing the salaries of the several city officers, 
with the exception of the Treasurer and Auditor, 
for the year beginning on the 1st of April next. 
The only changes proposed in the present salaries 
and allowances for clerk hire are the following: 
A reduction of $1060 in the allowance for clerk 
hire in the City Clerk's office, on account of the 
change in the method of prepaiing the voting lists ; 
an increase of $400 in the salary of the Clerk of 
Committees; an increase of $200 in the salary of 
the Assistant Clerk of Committees ; an increase of 
$200 in the allowance tor clerk hire to 
the Clerk of the Common Council; an in- 
crease of $200 in the salary of the Second 
Assistant Messengei ; an increase of $200 
in the allowance of clerk hire to the City Registrar. 
Total amount of increase, $1200; total amount of 
reduction, $1060. The committee are not prepared 
at this time to recommend any action upon the 
salaries of the Treasurer and Auditor; and their 
report on those two officers will be presented at a 
later date. Respectfully submitted, 

Solomon B. Stebbins. 

Charles J. Prescott. 

RUFUS CUSHMAN. 

Thomas J. Anderson. 
Frederick G. Walbbidge. 
Committee. 

The several orders appended to the report were 
read once. 

SEWEBS. 

Alderman Harris, for the Committee on Sewers, 
submitted the following: 

Ordered, That $37.83 be abated from the assess- 
ment levied upon Laviuia Mcintosh, and $73.13 be 
abated from the assessment on Hannah Tobey's 
heirs, for a sewer in Blue Hill avenue, on account 
of land to be hereafter assessed upon Woodville 
square; also that $36.18 be abated from the assess- 
ment of Joseph W. Ward, tor a sewer in Eighth 
street, and the same amount assessed upon Timo- 
thy W. Ray. 

Read twice and passed. 

Report recommending leave to withdraw on 
petition of John H. Robinson for abatement of 
sewer assessment m Brook avenue. Accepted. 

Reports with orders for the proportionate as- 
sessment and collection of cost of sewers, as fol- 
lows : Allston and Bulfinch streets; Perrin street; 
New Washington street; Fairfield street. Orders 
severally read twice and passed. 

STREET DAMAGES. 

Alderman Harris, for the Committee on Streets 
on the part of the Board, submitted orders to pay 
for street damages, as follows : 

Heirs of Joshua Bennett, $2935.50, for widening 
of Leverett street. 

Heirs of Joshua Bennett, $8248, for extension of 
Auburn street to Leverett street. 



W. R. Howe, $672.25, for widening of Shawmut 
avenue. 

Heirs of J. M. Smith, $971.25, for widening of 
Pear) street. 

Severally read once. 

MORTGAGE DISCHARGED. 

Alderman Kigelow, for the Committee on the 
Treasury Department on the part of the Board of 
Aldermen, to whom was referred the petition of 
Augustus Parker for discharge of mortgage, sub- 
mitted a report recommending the passage ot the 
following: 

Ordered, That his honor the Mayor be and he is 
hereby authorized to discharge the mortgage 
given by Ebenezer Seaver, formerly Collector of 
the town of Roxbury, to Aaron Davis, Treasurer 
®f said town, said mortgage being dated the 2d 
of November, A. D, 1795, and recorded with Nor- 
folk Deeds, lib. 4, fol. 202. 

Read once. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Bigelow, for the Committee on Li- 
censes, submitted reports as follows: 

Auctioneer's License Renewed — Thomas H. 
Webb, 41 Tremont street. 

Wagon License Granted— Frederic H. Virge, 
119 South street. 

Amusement Licenses Granted — Cushing & 
Ladd, to give exhibition of the Chauncy Hall 
School at Music Hall, Feb. 10: Warren-street 
Chapel, for a Washington's Birthday Festival at 
Music Hall; Professor A. C. Carpenter, for lec- 
tures on Mesmerism and Psychology at Beethoven 
Hall. 

Intelligence Offices Licensed— George A. Apple- 
by, 23y 2 Leverett street; Mrs. DupaDa, 1 Blossom 
place. 

Innholder's License Granted— W. B. Shaw, 70 
Hudson street. 

Victuallers' Licenses Granted — George L. 
Rumph, 322 North street; J. H. Flack & Co., 375 
Washington street; Larkie & Newcomb, 1465 
Washington street; Charles Coughlin, 149 Broad- 
way, South Boston; J. H. Cunningham, Washing- 
ton street, Brighton District. 

Minors Licensed— Twenty-four newsboys. 

Severally accepted. 

PERMITS FOR STABLFS. 

Alderman Worthington, for the Committee on 
Health on the part of the Board, submitted reports 
recommending the granting, on the usual condi- 
tions, of petitions for leave to occupy stables as 
follows : 

J. Albert Johnston, Norfolk street, Ward 16; 
Louis Earl, Hartford street, Ward 16; Ira E. Fair- 
banks, Evans street, Ward 16. 

Severally accepted. 

USE OF STREETS FOR COASTING. 

Alderman Burrage, for the Committee on Po- 
lice, submitted a report that this Board has no 
power to comply with the prayer of R. T. Swan et 
al. that certain ytteets in Ward 16 be used for 
coasting:, subject to the supervision of the police. 
Accepted. 

PERMIT TO MOVE BUILDING. 

Alderman Power, for the Committee on Paving, 
submitted a report in favor of granting a permit, 
on the usual conditions, to M. P. Sias, for leave to 
move a wooden building in East Boston. Ac- 
cepted. 

THE PABK QUESTION. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins, the order for 
the Mayor to petition the General Court for au- 
thority "to purchase or otherwise take land within 
the limits of the city" for purpose of public parks, 
was taken from the table, and especially assigned 
for next Mori -:ay, at 5 P. M. 

Alderman Stebbins moved that the Board pro- 
ceed to ballot for heads of departments. 

Alderman Quincy opposed the motion on the 
ground that certificates of election had not been 
received from the other branch, and they should 
wait to see the result there, as it was known there 
was to be opposition in at least one case. Cour- 
tesy to the absent member [Aldermen Pope] also 
required delay. 

Alderman Power thought there was no reason 
for delay, and if there was opposition to the re- 
election of any one, that case could be laid over. 

The motion was lost— 5 for, 6 against— and on 
motion of Alderman Prescott, the Board ad- 
journed. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



50 



CITY OF BO STON. 

Proceedings of the Common Council, 

FEBRUARY 11, 1875. 



Regular weekly meeting at 7y 2 o'clock, Halsey 
J. Boardman, President, in the cnair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN FOR CON- 
CURRENCE. 

Auditor's Monthly Exhibic (City Doc. 21); An- 
nual Report of Commissioner of Bridges between 
Boston and Cambridge (City Doc. 23); Quarterly 
Reports of overseers of the Boor, and Superin- 
tendent of North Scales. Severally placed on file. 

Petitions of J. R. Peck, Mary S. Everett, and 
Company A, Ninth Begiment Infantry. Severally 
referred . 

Report and order to issue to John Gilson a cer- 
tificate of indebtedness for $4Q00, on the condi- 
tions set forth in said otder. Order passed to a 
second reading. 

Report and order to pay the interest due on the 
Pierce Fuel Fund from Sept. 1, 1872, to Sept. 1, 
1873, amounting to $90. Order passed to a second 
reading. 

Certificate of the election of Uriel H. Crocker 
as a member of the Cochituate Water Boaid, in 
place of Amos L. Noyes chosen by this Council. 
The Council proceeded to ballot. Messrs. Wads- 
worth of Ward 4, Newton of Ward 14, and Fitz- 
patnck of Ward 7 were appointed a committee to 
collect and count votes, They reported— 

Whols number of votes 51 

Necessary for a choice 26 

Amos L. Noyes had 33 

Uriel H. Crocker 18 

And Mr. Noyes was declared elected in non-con- 
currence. Certificate sent up. 

Report and order for a transfer from the appro- 
priation for Police Station House, South Boston, 
to that for Police Station House, Ward 16, of the. 
sum of $2000. Order passed to a second reading. 

Report and order for a loan of $476,000 for widen- 
ing, building and extending Swett street from Al- 
bany street to Dorchester avenue. Order passed 
to a' second reading. 

The order for the celebration of Washington's 
Birthday came up with an amendmeat to insert 
"provided that tne salute in the city proper may 
be omitted at the discretion ot the Mayor" in the 
order for the observance of Washington's Birth- 
day. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 4—1 offer the following- 
amendment to the amendment that has been sent 
down from the Board of Aldermen : 

"Provided that no salute in the city proper shall 
be fired upon the Common or Public Garden." 

This amendment to theamendment is, of course, 
the same that was offered at the last meeting of 
the Council. At that time, after offering the 
amendment, I found from the debate which arose 
that there seemed to be a misunderstanding in re- 
gard to two or three points relating to the cele- 
bration of the day. I referred to City Docu ment 
No. 33 of 1873, supposing it was familiar to most of 
the members of the Council; but I find that it was 
not as familiar to them as it ought to be. It is the 
report of the committee which prepared tie ordi- 
nance which now regulates the firing of cannon 
upon the Common, in regard to which they took 
testimony. I desire to read one or two extracts 
from that report, so that there may be no mistake 
as to the effect of the firing of cannon upon the 
sick. Dr. Edward H. Clarke says— 

"In reply I have to say, that, so far as I have ob- 
served, such firing affects the majority of invalids 
and sick persons in its vicinity unpleasantly; that 
it affects some of them seriously; and that it oc- 
casionally affects a sick person dangerously. 
During the last artillery practice on the Common, 
one of my patients in the neighborhood rolled, 
with every shot, from one side of hsr bed to the 
other, in a sort of agony. Twice during the past 
year premature confinements started with the 
firing and seemed to be induced by it." 

Dr. G. H.Lyman says, "Upon the Fourth of July 
and other long- established fielddays the wealthier 
classes may be often removed to a distance, and 
thus escape the injury; but even this class are 
often too ill to be removed, audit certainly should 
need no doctor to relate the effect upon the shat- 
tered nervous system of such cases of prostration. 
The poorer classes, living in the narrower neigh- 
boring streets and alleys, have as acutely sensi- 
tive diseases as their more prosperous and wealthy 



neighbors, and I think no physician of experience 
could hesitate in pronouncing the practice in 
question an unmitigated nuisauce, and one that 
ought to be abated." 

fhe evidence of Dr. R. M. Hodges, Dr. C. D. 
Hornstns and Dr. F. Minot is to the same effect. 
I think that is a sufficient answer to the statement 
that no injury ever happened to a sick person by 
the firing of cannon upon rhe Common. I also 
wish to make a correction in regard to an error 
which prevails in the minds of some that the ob- 
servance of the Twenty-second of February is a 
time-honored custom, and I have taken the pains 
to find the legislation on the subject. Three le^al 
holidays were first appointed. By chapter 182 of the 
acts' of 1838, Thanksgiving Day, Fast Day and 
Fourth of July were made holiday?, c o that notes 
were to be paid on the day previous. By chapter 91 
of the acts of 1855 Christmas was added, and by 
chapter 113 of the acts of 1856 Washington's Birth- 
day was made a legal hoi' clay for the first time, 
and the act enlarged so that the Legislature and 
the courts should hold no sessions and ihe public 
offices be closed. The celebration of Washinr ton's 
Birthday is the only relic of Know Nothiugisin, 
and the sole oesireof the Know Nothing party 
was to observe that day by making everybody 
miserable. I think our former action should be 
reconsidered. At present we throw the responsi- 
bility upon his Honor the Mayor, and that we 
ought not to oo. By tins order we propose to fire 
cannon upon the Common, but leave the Mayor 
responsible for the results which will follow. For 
these reasons I hope the amendment which I 
offered will be adopted. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 15 — I lived for fifteen years 
within a stone's throw of Boston Common, when 
it was surrounded by dwelling houses, and I never 
heard of any damag'e done to the sick by the fir- 
ing of cannon there. In fact it was always con- 
sidered a pleasure upon all the holidays to have 
the cannon fired upon Boston Common. Except 
on Beacon and Boylston streets the nouses fronting 
on the Common are mostly occupied for business 
purposes, and there would naturally be less an- 
noyance than formerly. Unless there is some 
case of extreme sickness, I hope the cannon will 
be fired there. When a, famous battery came here 
a few years ago we were all glad to have them 
exhibit their practice on the Common. It is a 
large place and I don't think any damage will be 
clone. In case there is extreme sickness I hope 
the Mayor will omit the salute. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7—1 ask for the ruling of the 
Chair as to the propriety of theamendment being 
offered at this time. My own opinion is that the 
subject of the amendment was presented here at 
the last meeting, discussed and rejected, and it is 
only offered now in another form, as an amend- 
ment to the amendment adopted by the Board of 
Aldermen. 

The President— The Chair is of the opinion that 
the amendment is not strictly in order. Under 
the rule the amendment from the Board of Alder- 
men must be accepted or rejected altogether un- 
less an amendment is offered which is entirely 
within the scope of and which does not contra- 
vene the provisions of that adopted by the Board 
of Aldermen. It would appearhere thatthe discre- 
tion of omitting the salute is conferred by the 
Board upon the Mayor, while by this amendment 
he is denied such discretion. Although the point 
is not beyond all cxuestion, the Chair is of the 
opinion that the amendment is not strictly in or- 
der and wou) w therefore rule it out. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5— There is another objection 
to the amendment that must strike every logical 
mind here. The Board of Aldermen have asked 
us to concur in their amendment. INow what is 
the language of the amendment to the amend- 
ment? "Provided that no salute in the city 
proper shall be fired upon the Common or Public 
Garden." Why, that is the whole matter in ques- 
tion. By the amendment of the Board of Alder- 
men it is left to the Mayor to decide whether or 
not a salute shall be fired ; and there being no 
other suitable place in the city proper besides the 
Common, he is to decide whether or not the can- 
non shall be fired. Now, you would add an amend- 
ment which would not only nullify that of the 
Board of Aldermen, and which, cenamly, in any 
correct acceptation of the meaning of the English 
language does nrfllify it, but which is ridiculous 
upon its face. Of course it is not in order as the 
gentleman from Ward 7 raited the point, and as 
the Chair has so well decided. The question is 
whether to concur or nonconcur with the Board 
of AUIermen. But this amendment to that amend- 
ment is not— 



■i 



51 



COMMON COTlNOIL, 



Mr. Crocker of Ward 6 — I rise to a point of 
order. 

Mr. Shaw— I expected to be called to order. 

The President — The gentleman will state his 
point of order. 

Mr. Crocker— The gentleman from Ward 5 is 
indorsing a decision of the Chair to which no one 
has objected. 

Mr. Shaw — I rose to debate the main questioi). 

The amendment of the Board of Aldermen was 
adopted in concurrence — yeas 59, nays 2 — Messrs. 
Anderson of Ward 3 and Devereux of Ward 22 
voting nay. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order for the City Engineer to make such pur- 
chases of supplies, instruments, drawing materi- 
als and furniture, and to incur sucb other ex- 
penses as may be necessary in his department 
during the present municipal year. 

Order for the Committee on Public Buildings 
to suppjy necessary furniture, and cause such le- 
pairs and cleaning to be made as may be needed 
in the several schoolhouses. 

Order for the City Surveyor to make such pur- 
chases of supplies, mstrumencs, drawing materi- 
als and furniture, and to incur such other ex- 
penses as may be necessary in his department 
during the present municipal year. 

Order for the Committee on Public BuPdirgs to 
supply furniture for, and cause necessary clean- 
ing and repairs to be made in the City Hall, police 
stations and engine hruses and other public 
buildings where the same are not made by the de- 
partments using the same. 

Order for the purchase of law books for the City 
Solicitor's office, at a cost not exceeding $275. 

An ordinance to amend an ordinance relating to 
the Law Department, providing for appointment 
of Fourth Assistant Solicitor, etc. 

Order to remit tax of $209.04 (with interest and 
costs), assessed upon Henry W. Pickering in 1874, 
as executor of ihe estate of Caroline Newman. 

Order for the city to assume and pay the tax of 
$1018.68, assessed for 1874 upon certain real estate 
devised to the city by David Sears. 

Severally passed, in concurrence. 

Order to allow and pay $65 as rent for a tem- 
porary armory for Company C, Fourth Battalion 
of Infantry. Passed— Yeas 52, nays 0. Sent up. 

ADDITIONAL WATER SUPPLY. 

The orders appropriating $1,500,000 for extension 
of the Cochituate Water Works, and granting au- 
thority for said extension, and to construct a si- 
phon pipe across Charles River [reprinted City 
Doc. No. 20, with amendments of the Board of Al- 
dermen thereto], were considered in the regular 
order under unfinished business, the question be- 
ing on the passage of the orders. 

Mr. Wilson of Ward 12— I do not fee) like making 
opposition to any legitimate plan for increasing 
the facilities of Boston for obtaining a supply of 
pure water; but I would like to have this matter 
brought more clearly before the Council, and 
reasons given why rhere is included in this 
project for the enlargement of the water supply, 
the building of the conduit or aqueduct between 
Farm Pond and Chestnut Hill Reservoir, wh-m 
the vote of the City Council last year, authoriz- 
ing the taking of Sudbury River and utilizing it , 
for a supply for Boston, expresily provided 
that this conduit should not be built. I feel 
an extreme hesitancy at opening any debate 
upon this question, because I am a new 
member of the Council and have not had the 
privilege of participating in the discus- 
sion of the question that sime of the older mem- 
bers had last.year. This measure was brought be- 
fore the Committee on Water ao a very early day 
in the year — about twenty-four hours after the 
committee was organized. It was represented to 
the committee that this was an urgent case ; that 
the city was suffering for want of water, and that 
something must be done right away; and at an 
adjourned meeting of the committee it was again 
brought up and passed. A majority of the com- 
mittee had undoubtedly made up their minds; 
however, I thought it my duty to bring the matter 
before the Council. I do not know that any great 
number of members desire to discuss it; at the 
same time I think the opportunity should 
be offered to those who do desire it. As 
I had had no opportunity to examine 
the plan in all its details, and as a taxpayer I feel 
its importance, I stated to the committee that it 
should not be considered discourteous if I dis- 
cussed it upon the floor of the Council. I have 
not— nor do I think any one has— had time, in the 
brief period that has elapsed, to give it the full 



and careful consideration it deserves, and I should 
like to hear from those who believe in the neces- 
sity tor the early construction of this large con- 
duit (which is to bring 70,000,000 of gallons to Bos- 
ton, and is really going to discard the use of the 
old conduit), why it is necessary at this juncture 
to spend $1,500,000 to carry out this large scheme 
for a conduit or aqueduct. No one will question 
the propriety of constructing the siphon pipe 
across the Charles River, which is provided for in 
the last order. No one will object to thar, for it 
is perfectly proper. It is to cost only $30,000 and 
will add from twenty-five to thirty per cent, to the 
conducting power of the present conduit; it can 
be rjut in speedily, and with the connection now 
made between Farm Pond and Lake Cochituate, 
there is no apprehension that more water will be 
nee ded , or of a scarcity of water in case of a drought, 
and when it is an admitted fact that to apopt the 
larger and more expensive project and carry it out 
will entail an unnecessary expense of one half or 
three-quarters of a million dollars — that is, to 
construct works for a hundred years hence, when 
all we want is to provide for twenty-five years — 
when, by taking a smaller scale of works, which 
upon examination, I think will be entirely ade- 
quate, we can save a very large sum of money 
by preventing a large increase of the already bur- 
densome water debt of the city, which is at present 
large enough, and must inevitably increase. It 
makes no difference whether it is water debt or 
city debt; it must be paid by the taxpayers, and 
it has got to be paid by the city, and any 
sophistry of that kind used in support of this or- 
der is an attempt to explain the difference be- 
tween tweedledum and tweedledee. At any rate, 
a few years ago the water debt became so large 
that it was reduced $3,000,000 by a transfer to the 
city debt. Now, I should like to have this matter 
discussed, not tonight, but at an early day ; and I 
desire that there should be a simplification of this 
order, so that we can vote tor this siphon pipe 
(which is important and should be put in a- 
once), and that the Water Board may have auf 
thority to take lauds for the location of 
storage re ervoirs and that we may apprD* 
priate money to construct them. But in 
regard to that conduit, which is not an immediate 
necessity, and will not relieve the present exi- 
gency, we should look into that scheme and see 
if we are prepared to vote for $1,500,000 or 
$1,750,000 at this time for that purpose. I do not 
think that if this matter is fully canvassed and 
understood by the ^Council it will be found 
preferable to appropriate a sum of money ade- 
quate to complete the entire work, and not do it 
by piecemeal. It has been my own past experi- 
ence — and I think it has been rhe experience of 
other members of this Council— that many 
large works have been undertaken by a partial 
appropriation, only to be regretted before they 
were completed. I feel perfectly satisfied in my 
own mind tonight (and the more I think of it the 
more I feel satisfied) that to construct this large 
conduit as proposed from Farm Pond to Chest- 
nut Hill Reservoir, will render the present con- 
duit from Lake Cochituate to Chestnut Hill Res- 
ervoir unnecessary, and will also render unneces- 
sary the connection to be made between Peg an 
Brook and Charles River. If we do not need more 
than 20,000,000 gallons a day, as has been admitted, 
that quantity can be brought through the present 
conduit ; and when it is admitted further, that the 
present conduit, although exposed and in a some- 
what dilapidated condition, can be made as good 
as new for $50,000— that the work which cost 
from a million and a half to three quarters of a 
million originally, after having been in use twen- 
ty-eight years, is so good that for $50,000 it can be 
made as good as new— I think the policy of the 
city is to lay another conduit as near to it 
as one can be constructed, and then we 
will have two .as good as new, and have 
enough conducting capacity to supply the city for 
twenty-five years. It is said that by so doing we 
shall throw away the vast expenditure made on 
the tunnel at Newton. Whether or not that work 
was well undertaken 1 do not know; but it has 
been undertaken, and can be utilized for this 
same plan of works which I propose. By a very 
slight change it can be utilized for this conduit, 
and it can be further utilized for the proposed 
conduit from Farm Pond to Chestnut Hill Reser- 
voir. Both plans would then be utilized ; the large 
expenditure already made would be saved, and 
utilized" in improvements which may be pro- 
posed in the future. And, sir, I do feel that this 
matter has not been placed before the City Coun- 



FEBEUARY 11, 1875 



53 



cil in a manner that is perfectly ingenuous. I ex- 
pressed this same feeling at the meeting of the 
Water Committee. I felc that it was the 
duty of the Water Board to lay this 
matter before the City Council in such 
a manner that they could act directly and 
understand™ civ upon each item. Now, it has 
been said that the Water Board cannot take cer- 
tain lands beneath which the present tunnel is 
being constructed in Newton. Well, it has been 
decided chat it is perfectly competent for the City 
Council to authorize the Water Board to take 
those lands, and there is no one who doubts that 
the City Council would pass such a vote if it was 
asked for. The Water Board have frequently 
admitted that they have been trespassing over 
and under people's property, and paying large 
sums in the settlement of damages, when, by a 
simple older of the City Council they might have 
been authorized to take them legally and per- 
manently, and then the city would be called upon 
to pay no larger sum than a jury would award; 
and I think there would be substantial economy 
in so doini'. But now we are asked to give this 
sweeping authoiity to spend a large sum of 
money, when I do feel that if the subject 
should be thoroughly canvassed a majority 
of the Council would • agree with me that 
the larger scheme is not the one to be 
adopted. I admit that it is grand and plausible, 
and perha---s it is encouraging to a man to under- 
take large schemes, while it is fascinating to one 
who may like to carry them out. But to the tax- 
payers who have to p^y for such great echemes 
the prospect has not so many favoiable aspects, 
and we have got to tate the responsibility of in- 
augurating this great scheme for a huge conduit 
or aqueduct which is to convey to this great city 
70.000,000 gallons of water daily, which I feel is in 
excess of the demand of Boston for many years to 
come. Understand me, Mr. President, that if 
we build this conduit, we shall have it in 
addition to the present one (which is good 
for 20,000,000 gallons daily, by the admission of 
the engineer), and the Mystic source, which is 
good for 20,000,000 more. Now, sir, T desire to vote 
for that portion of this order which confers suffi- 
cient authority upon the Water Board to take the 
lands upon which they are trespassing today. I 
believe they should take all the lands necessary 
for the utilization of the Sudbury River, which is 
now the property of the city and must be paid 
for. There has been some question about the 
expediency of taking that source, and upon that 
subject there has been an honest difference of 
opinion. But as we examine into it we find that the 
city has taken Sudbury River and is bouud to pay 
for it. Having taken it I think the city is bound 
to utilize it, and I am willing to vote a sufficient 
sum of monev to take all the lands necessary for 
the proper utilization of the river as a source of 
supply for the city. But I do not feel willing, 
and I think others here are not willing, to vote 
this large sum to build this conduit from Farm 
Pond to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

Mr. Sweetser of Ward 10— In reply to the gen- 
tleman's question, made when he arose, why this 
matter, which was voted upon at the last meeting 
of the previous Council— by which the Water 
Board were restricted from the spending of money 
for the building of this conduit; — should not be 
brought up, and why it was not done then, I would 
say that it was not done for the very reason which 
the gentleman urges tonight. No oue wished any- 
thing to be done in a hurry and without a full un- 
derstanding of the wants of the city. It was not 
meant that they should never build a conduit, or 
never ask f 01 money. I do not think that any gen- 
tleman who has been to Lake Cochituate within the 
last fortnight and seen the state of the water there, 
and seen the difficulty in which the city of Boston 
has been placed— and we are aware that Criarles- 
town, which depends upon the M>stic water, was 
placed in almost as dangerous a position as Bos- 
ton— should hesitate for one moment in regard to 
securing a sufficient supply at the earliest day. I 
was one of those who, in the last Council, voted 
against the Sudbury project until I got all the in- 
formation which 1 could in regard to a proper 
source of supply for the city of Boston; and when 
I saw the danger in which the city of Boston had 
been put by the delay, then my vote was changed, 
and I voted for Sudbury River with the restric- 
tions put upon it at that late hour. Since 
then, I have l.ad an opportunity, in company 
with a large number of gentlemen, to visit Lake 
Cochituate, and to have consultations with the 
City Engineer and Water Registrar, and I think I 



express the opinions of very many who agreed 
an,d voted with me last year, when I say it 
is important that power and authority should be 
given the Water Board and City Engineer to go 
forward at once with this work. With regard to 
building another conduit from Lake Cochit- 
uate to Chestnut Hill Reservoir, that has been 
pronounced by eminent engineers besides our 
own as a very dangerous thing to do. The ex- 
pense of building a conduit direct from Farm 
Pond to the reservoir will be about athirJ more 
than that of constructing another from the 
lake to the reservoir, provided they be of the 
same capacity; but by the old route we 

fet only about three inches fall, while on the 
arm Pond route we shall have twelve inches; 
consequently we get two-thirds more carrying 
power than if we bring it bv the old route. Then 
we should n't save anything ir> land damages, 
which are a very great expense. The land 
damages in bringing the conduit from the lake 
would probably be large, going, as it would, 
through towns now thickly settled. The land 
damages we should have to pay would be more 
than for the whole line of the Farm Pond conduit. 
Then there is a suggestion that a third route to 
the lake, independent from the old one, can be 
taken. But surveys have been made, and it has 
been determined that only one such route can 
be taken, and that is to start from the 
south part of the lake, where the surface 
is lower, and the expense would he as large as by 
the Farm Pond route. One reason why it is better 
to build a conduit large enough to supplv the city 
of Boston for a long period is that the first cost is 
so little more than it wouid be to construct 
another one twenty five years from now; so that 
it is better economy to build a large one now, than 
to have to construct another one at that time. 
This conduit is planned so that if we have to pro- 
cure a» supply from Charles River, in case the 
Sudbury is not large enough — or in case we have 
to go to the Memmac River — it will be of ample 
size to supply the city. It is true, as the gen- 
tleman from "Ward 12 says, the present conduit 
can be repaired for $50,000; and he asks, why 
do you want another conduit so soon? We 
have just had a severe drought, and we may have 
another Dext year; if we delay giving the Water 
Board money enough to lav out reservoirs and to 
build a conduit tor twelve or twenty- four months, 
it will be a long while before we can aet the water 
to the city of Boston through the new conduit, 
and we may have another drought, as we had this 
year, and then our increased quantity of water 
will be of no use. In the committee the gentle- 
man, who is an engineer, was asked to show some 
plan. He offered no objections till the vote was 
taken. Then he was asked to make some state- 
ment hew this thing could be done cheaper; but 
he did not, and now he comes in here and opposes 
the passage of this order, and objects to 
the general plan, but he gives us nothing- 
better. We have an engineer employed by the 
city of Boston to look into this matter ;' his figures 
are here and his opinion is entitled to a good deal 
of weight, and I think we should not throw out 
his suggestions without giving - some good reasons. 
If the gentleman from Ward 12 can show any 
good reason why this project should be delayed, I 
shall be glad to have Mm' do so. But I don't'think 
he has or can give good reasons. I hope ihe 
Council will pass this order tonight, that the 
Water Board and Engineer may prosecute the 
work of building this conduit. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6— Those members who 
were here last year, and those who are conversant 
with our proceedings, must be well aware that 
this water question has been before the City 
Council off and on— if I may be allowed to use such 
an expression — for a year and a half. One great 
difference of opinion was as to the line to be 
adopted for the new conduit. At the end of last 
year the Council determined — because of the 
drought probably more than for any other reason, 
but still they determined— that they would take 
Sudbury River. It was taken, and the subject 
was left so that the line of the conduit should be 
deteimined in the future— and not, as my friend 
from Ward 12 says, that there should be no con- 
duit. It was "provided that until the further 
ordering of the City Council, no lands 
should be taken for tne construction of the 
conduit from Farm Pond to Chestnut Hill Reser- 
voir, and no money beyond the present appropria- 
tion shall be expended." The line from Farm 
Pond to Chestnut Hill Reservoir was recommend- 
ed by the City Engineer and all of the Water Com- 



53 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



mittee except one gentleman. Now, it is admitted, 
that we need another conduit; whether we take 
the line proposed by the committee or by the gen- 
tleman from Ward 12, or the third toute," we need 
a new conduit. The present conriuit is not large 
enough to bring to the Chestnut Hill Reservoir the 
daily supply which the city uses; and that is the 
chief reason why it is import an: to have the new 
conduit commenced at once. Drought or no 
drought, we need a conduit or aque met which 
will bring enough water to the city of Boston to 
supply the daily wants of its inhabitants. 
Now, if I understand the arentleman from Ward 
12 correctly, he favors the construction of the 
reservoirs, which he and the committee say are 
necessary, and should be constiucted at once. He 
says, too', that the siphon across Charles River 
ought to be constructed at once. The only ques- 
tion left then, as it seems to me, for the Council co 
deteimine, is which shall be the line of the con- 
duit. I canrot think there is any question about 
the necessity for a new conduit. I do not believe 
there is any doubt upon that point in tl e minds 
of five gentlemen in this room; the simple 
question is, which is the proper line? The 
reports before us last year gave the fig- 
ures of the cost of conduits by the old 
and new route. I have not them in memory, 
but it has been admitted that we should have a 
conduit large enough to bring water into Boston 
so as not to have to build another one m the 
course of a few years, and to do that the only line 
we can adopt is the one from Farm Pond to 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir. If we take the line by 
the s ; de of the present conduit, we shall build a 
smaller one than we will if we adopt the new line. 
Secondly, that conduit must be broughr. up 
nearer the top of Lake Cochituate, and if the 
water should get helow it of course we shall be 
able to draw no water through it. If we are com- 
pelled to keep Lake Cochituate full of water to 
supply that conduit, then we should lose so much 
of the storage capacity of the lake as lies be- 
tween the depth? of the old and new con- 
duits. That was one reason urged by the City 
Engineer and Water Commiitee last year why the 
Farm Pond line of conduit should be adopted. 
Another reason why the Farm Pond line should 
be adopted was, that if you build another conduit 
from the lake to the reservoir, then all the water 
of the Sudbury River must go through the lake; 
while if you build by the Farm Pond line, then 
you can bring the Sudbury water into the city in- 
dependent ot the lake, so that if Sudbury River 
water is not in a condition to use, we can draw 
temporarily from the reservoir and the luke. 
Gentlemen will remember that this question 
was among those put to the Medical Commis- 
sion, and they decided that if you are 
going to take Sudbury River, they ' do not 
see any advantage, but the reverse, in 
bringing the Sudbury River water through Lake 
Cochituate. Those, briefly, are the reasons why 
the Farm Pond line should be selected. But, 
whether we select that line, or a new one, I hope, 
for one, that there will be no delay. It is import- 
ant that this order, or one providing for the con- 
struction of a conduit, should be passed at a very 
early day. We are now approaching the middle 
of February ; as soon as spring opens we ouaht to 
commence work somewhere, upon some line. We 
ought to take all the time required to discuss 
these two lines; but if we cause unnecessary de- 
lay, perhaps we shall throw the beginning 
of this work over into another spring. I 
think there is not a citizen of Boston but 
who feels that during this year some pro- 
gress ought to be made towards getting an inde- 
pendent supoly of water into Boston at the ear- 
liest possible moment. For one, having thor- 
oughly considered this matter, and listened with 
pleasure to the arguments of many gentlemen 
last year, I have fully made up my mind, and 
doubt not that many others have done the same. If 
there should be any number of gentlemen who 
desire longer time to consider this matter, of 
course we ought, in courtesy, to nostnone the 
vote upon this question until another meeting; if 
not, I hope the vote will be taken tonight, as I be- 
lieve a majority of the members are ready to act 
upon this question. 

Mr. Peabody of Ward 9— Since we were driven 
by what seemed to be rot only an unfortunate but 
an absolute necessity to adopt Sudbury River as a 
source of water supply, and are obliged to pay for 
it, I think we all agree that we should utilize it in 
such a way that Boston shall no longer suffer for 
want of water; that we shall have water to use 



for our fountains, manufactures and other desira- 
ble put poses. So long as we have to pay for an 
ample quantity o* water we wanl the use and en- 
joyment of it; and I suppose that we shall all 
agree that we do need some kind of a conduit to 
give us an ample enjoyment and use of that water 
for which we have to pay. I have had a strong- 
feeling that there was a great deal of merit in the 
project advocated by the gentleman from Ward 
12. It certainly had the recommendation of econo- 
my, aud one of my reasons for being unwilling to 
vote for the Farm Pond conduit last 
year was that I hoped we should have 
a thorough investigation of this subject. I 
saw with" great pleasure that the gentleman 
from Ward 12 was placed upon the Commit- 
tee on Water, and also that the committee under- 
went, ac the commencement of the year, almost a 
total change. Not that I had a lack of confidence 
in the gentlemen composing the committee of last 
year; but I thought perhaps they might have an 
undue bias towards a scheme which they had 
been looking into so long. I was glad, therefore, 
that the committee was almost entirely new, and 
I urged upon my friend on my left [Mr. Sweet- 
ser] that this" plan of constructing another 
conduit to the lake should be "thorough- 
ly investigated, and he Assured me that he would 
give it as com plete an examination as he could. 
Now, that committee have reported in favor of 
the Farm Pond conduit, precisely as last year's 
committee did. The result is that it is approved 
by the Mayor and has received a unanimous vote 
in the Board of Aldermen. Now, under those cir- 
cumstances, what will be the result if we refuse 
to vote for the appropriation, or let it lie upon 
the table permanently and keep it here? Of 
course, the work will be at a standstill. There is 
not the slightest probability that all these powers 
in the Government will turn to another scheme. 
My own little experience in such affairs is, that 
while this Council is very strong to defeat a 
scheme which does not meet its approval, 
it has very little power to get the other branches 
to adopt another scheme. Now, the question is, 
is it advisable to be still duting the coming sum- 
mer, wu?n I think it will be agreed that probably 
labor will be cheaper than it is likely to be in 
many years, and the cost of construction will 
probably be lower than in any other season for 
many "years. Money is now so easy that city 
bonds sold in the market a few days ago at lOS 1 ^, 
the highest price for many years; last year they 
were about 98. That makes a marked difference 
also in favor of this year for the work, while if 
we lie still we must lose the enjoyment of this 
water that we have to pay tor. Under all those 
circumstances, with so little to be accomplished 
by delay, aud so little actual fact adduced in be- 
half of the smaller conduit to Lake Cochituate, it 
seems to me to be, on the whole, wisest to vote 
for the appropriation. 

Mr. Wilson of Ward 12 — I desire to place myself 
right before the Council, because it would seem 
by the remarks of mv colleague [Mr. Sweetser], 
on the committee, that I have been derelict in my 
duty. I do not admit that I am in that position. 
I do not think any gentleman is bound to present 
an elaborate plan ac his own expense, when he 
undertakes to dissect one before the City Govern- 
ment. I discussed the subject in committee as I 
have before the Council, I asked questions which 
indicated the line of thought which occupied my 
mind. There is no present exigency, in my judg- 
ment, for bringing this large supply of water to 
the city of Boston. If it is to be decided that 
we do not need 70,000,000 gallons daily, 
why should we have it now? The Water 
Register was present at the committee meeting, 
and showed me that 20,000,000 gallons daily 
would be ample for twenty- five years. Now the 
question is, Are we anxious to provide a supply 
of water which will last longer than twenty-five 
years? If we are, then the matter assumes 
another phase. If it is a matter of volume, then 
there is no choice but to take the more expensive 
scheme. No matter what the obstacles are on 
any route, they can he overcome. The City Engi- 
neer assured me and stated to the committee that, 
by the plan which I suggested, and which seems 
to be reasonable and proper, at least a million and 
a half or three quarters could be saved. Now the 
question resolves itself into this, Shall we appro- 
priate money to procure 70,000,000 daily when we 
need only 20,000,000? If it is desired to 
put the whole into one order, and vote 
for all these things at once, I shall vote 
no. If it is left to us to pass upon these things 



FEBRUARY 11 



1875 



54 



separate from each other, I will vote for some of 
them. I have been drawn into such things too 
many times. It was the case when they brought in 
the Lake Oochituate plan; they first asked for 
$900,000; when that was gone through with they 
asked for $500,000 more. Then I urged that the 
work should be done by contract. After that 
money was spent they came in and said there 
had been some miscalculation and some change 
of plans, and they wanted another half million, 
and so on. till the work which was to be doi.e for 
$1,500,000 cost $2,500,000. It is my candid opinion 
that the result will be the same in this 
case. Now, if what we want is an ade- 
quate supply of water and no more— and 
20,000,000 gallons a day is enough for twenty years, 
the Water Registrar says ; then a conduit that 
will last twenty-five years is large enough, and the 
proper place to put it is alongside of the old one. 
The city owns much of that land — I cannot get a 
definite statement, the last time I asked for the 
plans I was told they were being bound — and that 
will be a saving of half a million. The matter of the 
conduit is not a question of supply. I sufficiently 
indicated in the committee that I believed in 
so utilizing these sources as to get as large a sup- 
ply as we may want. But the connection between 
Farm Pond and the lake, as it is today, will sup- 
ply Lake Cochituate and keep it full. This 
temporary con emit can be improved and made 
permanent at a slight expense, and then we 
can bring the SudDury water here by the 
proposed conduit. The first thing is to get 
the water, and then to bring it here. If the ques- 
tion is, Shall we furnish a water supply for all 
time? then I am content, and we must have a 
large volume of water. But it does seem too bad 
to plunge into this excessive expense simply to 
enjoy this large amount of water that is not need- 
ed. *I believe in a large and adequate supply of 
water. It was testified by the Water Registrar 
that 20,000,000 gallons will be ample for twenty- 
five years. If this matter is pressed tonisrht, I 
shall feel constrained to vote against the orders, 
because I shall not vote for what I believe is an 
unnecessary expense. It is linked with that which 
I believe to be right and just and should be 
adopted. I am not in the health and strength 
to take the initiative in this matter, but 
I felt it my duty to express my views to the Coun- 
cil. There are two points in these orders that I 
approve of and which are essential to the devel- 
opment of the source of supply. The question is 
as to the method of bringing this water to the 
city. I am in favor of doing that at a reasonable 
expense, but I am opposed to any unnecessary and 
excessive expenditure. 

Mr. Parker of Ward 14—1 should like the gentle- 
man from Ward 12, who is an engineer, to state 
how he thinks a new conduit could be laid beside 
the old one with perfect safety. 

Mr. Wilson of Ward 12— It is n't necessary to 
build it within a specified area. It might be sev- 
eral feet or less ; no man would put it within six 
feet when he had thirty. On most of the line 
there is no practical difficulty in putting it within 
as small a distance as six feet from the old con- 
duit, though I could not give any definite distance 
now. The City Engineer has stated that it could 
be pul within a distance of thirty feet. There 
would be no greater difficulty in building one 
conduit beside another than there is in building 
one sewer beside another. It is done every day. 
Both would be full of water, and botn are made 
of the same material, and one is about as large 
as the other. 

Mr. Sweetser of Ward 10— Mr. Chesbrough of 
Chicago was in this citv a fortnight since, and the 
question was asked him if it would be safe to 
build a new conduit beside the present one. His 
reply was that no engineer would allow such a 
thing to be done, for it would not be safe. The 
gentleman from Ward 12 makes a misstatement, 
though unintentionally probably, when he says 
we are spending money here to oring 70,000,000 

§allons into Boston. We are spending money to 
ring 40,000 000 into Boston. We shall have to 
spend money to bring 70,000,000 hers when the res- 
ervoirs are buile; and while we are building this 
conduit we want to make it of such a capacity 
that it will conduct the supply from those reser- 
voirs. But the expense we are providing for now 
is for 40,000,000 gallons. 

Mr. Wilson— I believe my statement is correct. 
The conduit is for 70,000,000 gallons, and not for 
40,000,000. 

Mr. Sweetser— We are building reservoirs for 
40,000,000 gallons, and a conduit for 70,000,000, in- 



stead of having to construct another conduit a 
few years hence in order to biing that quantity 
into the ciiy of Boston. 

Mr.Leighton of Ward 1— I think that a plentiful 
supjely of pure water is important and something 
that, the city of Boston should have. But before 
we expend so large a sum of money for an addi- 
tional supply of water I think we should 
adopt mtasures for the purification of the pres- 
ent supply. According to the report of the Medi- 
cal Commission I find that the Sudbury 
needs purification before it will be fit 
for domestic use ; and the Mystic is entirely 
unfit for domestic purposes, according to that re- 
port. If gentlemen will take the trouble to read 
that report they will find that the Mystic is almost 
poisonous. I think this question should be divid- 
ed, and that we should act upon the storage basins 
and proper means of purification first. 

Mt. Crocker of Ward 6— In regard to the re- 
marks of the gentleman about the purification of 
the water, it will ta^e two or three years to build 
this aqueduct, which will be time enough to allow 
the water to purify before it is brought in. The 
objection of the gentleman fiom Ward 12 is that 
the expense of this Faim Pond conduit is un- 
necessary at the present time. Plainly it is not. 
The city voted last year to take Sudbury River, 
and the question now comes up, In what 
way shall we bring the water into the 
city? It is important that we should come to an 
early decision upon this question. It is admitted 
on all hands that the present aqueduct is running- 
full, and carrying more gallons per oay than was 
ever intended, and it is liable to break down at 
any moment, especially if forced beyond its pres- 
ent capacity. If that happens, in my opinion, be- 
fore this new conduit is built, the city of Boston 
will be in a bad predicament, having nothing to 
bring the water into the city with, although it has 
plenty of water twenty or thirty miles out of the 
city. For that reason it is plain to me that we 
should be prompt in providing the means to 
brmg -this water to Boston, and not let this sum- 
mer be frittered away in talk, so that in the 
course of two or three years we may have 
an ample and sufficient supply — so that we 
may not only have what we now have— a conduit 
forced beyond its capacitj to bring what we need 
— but that we may be able to extend our pipes in- 
to Brighton and West Roxbury, and promptly 
answer the calls for water for all sorts of mechan- 
ical purposes, and which have to be refused. All 
the reasons show that we need a new conduit that 
will give a greater supply as soon as pos- 
sible. Then the question arises, Which is 
the right way to bring it? That is a com- 
plicated questiou, Which is the best line 
for the conduit? involving many considerations, 
all of which are difficult for us to appreciate. But 
there are a few considerations which can easily 
be understood. The gentleman from Ward 12 
says it is perfectly easy to build a conduit 
alongside of the old one, because it is easy to 
build a sewer alongside of another one. If he 
bases his faith in a new conduit beside the old 
one on the pressure of the sewer, it seems plain to 
me his whole foundation is not sound, and that we 
should not trust him or his scheme for a moment. 
Gentlemen know very well that a sewer runs with 
very little water in it, and if another one breaks 
down beside it there is no particular harm done; 
it can be repairpd very easily with a few bricks. 
But if the old conduit, running under pressure 
wit"- 20,000,000 gallons a day, should break, aud 
all Lake Cochituate begins to run out of the 
opening, how is that to be stopped? It 
has to be telegraphed to the station be- 
fore the water can be shut off, and gentlemen 
know the immense damage water does if it is run 
under pressure. If the supports of this old con- 
duit give way, there would be an immense rush of 
water, and a large amount of mischief would be 
done. Then suppose the new conduit success* 
fully built Deside the old one, is n't it plain that, 
with the two in such dangerous proximity, if a 
break should occur, the new one would be dam- 
aged and the supply of the city cut off? while if 
one sewer breaks, the water from that could be 
carried off by the other one. If we have a conduit 
by anindependentroute.whenonebreaksthe city's 
supply is safe. It is plain to me that the route 
by the side of the old one is hot the proper route. 
It is not safe to build it so, and it would not be 
safe after it was built. With regard to taking 
the Faim Pond route, the question comes as to 
the size of the conduit. Gentlemen, understand 
that while you are building a conduit it will not 



55 



COMMON COUNCIL 



add seriously to the expense to make it twice the 
size and carry tour times the amount of water we 
need, and then we shall be ready for the future. 
It seems to me that it would not be desirable to 
cut down the size of the conduit. It will take a 
little mote bricks and labor, but the increased ex- 
pense for a larger conduit will not be by any 
means disproportionate to the larger supply 
obtained. Then we shall have by that con- 
duit the means of bringing an ample supply to 
Boston, even if Lake Cochituate and the Mystic 
should give out. Gentlemen should consider that 
this matter requires a two- thirds vote. I suppose 
there is no question that the scheme for bringing 
the water by the old line of conduit cannot com- 
mand a two'-thiidsvote in this branch. The ques- 
tion is between this scheme and no water at all, 
or a postponement of the whole question. It is 
not a question of a majority on one side or the 
other; it is a question of setting a two-thirds vote, 
which we must get or postpone this whole matter. 
I believe that the only plan for a conduit which 
can commaud a two-thirds vote is that from Farm 
Pond. 

Mr. Day of Ward 1— To show that only a slight 
excess of water over that in the lake is needed, I 
will call the attention of members to page 34 of 
Cicv Document No. 29 of 1873: 

"To secure the estimated supply of 40,000,000 
gallons per day, seven nt-w storage reservoirs or 
basins are required, as has been before demon- 
strated. It will be many years before such a sup- 
ply is needed. For a while the Sudbury water will 
be used for short periods in each year only, to tide 
over the times when there is a deficisawy or some 
temporary impurity in the '""ochituate supply." 

Now, sir, as the city is now supplied with the 
water of Sudbury River, and as there is no danger 
of a water famine, and as this is too important a 
matter to be passed upon tonight, I move that it 
be sp< cially assigned to next Thursday evening at 
8% o'clock. 

Mr. Jaques of W rd 9—1 hope the motion to as- 
sign will not prevail. It seems to be forgotten 
that this subject is not a new one. It has been 
thoroughly discussed for two years. All the evi- 
dence that can be produced in regard to the mat- 
ter has been brought forward, and, as has been 
said tonight, all aie substantially agreed up- 
on the course to be pursued. That being 
the case, we have nothing to set against 
it except opinions not supported by evi- 
dence. The evidence has not been adduced and 
we should not set up our opinions against the 
mass of evidence we have here. If this order is 
not passed it simply means delay. It is n't possi- 
ble that all the evidence brought here can be ig- 
nored, or that the gentlemen having the subject 
in charge will change their opinions. Every gen- 
tleman here thinks delay is dangerous. I don't 
propose to go into this matter, as it has been 
thoroughly discussed, but it seems to me that two 
or three points in favor of the plan should be al- 
luded to. First, the increase in grade; instead of 
three inches in height we get twelve. Every en- 
gineer will see that is a great advantage. Next, 
if the conduit is carried to the lake, the grade 
of the present one must be followed, and the 
grade is such that the new one will inev- 
itably be thrown in close juxtaposition to the old 
one. That is stated by all engineers to be danger- 
ous, and it does n't require special knowledge of 
engineering to see that. Another advantage is 
that the Farm Pond source will be independent, 
and as this matter has been fully discussed, I hope 
the orders will be acted upon tonight. 

Mr. Harrigan of Ward 1 — I agree with my col- 
league from Ward 1 in regard to this matter. I 
have n't had time to post myself upon these con- 
duits and siphons, or any of those things, as I 
probably ought to do. But I know something of the 
water 1 am compel'ed to use and would like to see 
the City Government puiify it. I don't wish to be 
understood as opposing any plan for the city of 
Boston enjoying ample water facilities; but I do 
think it is due to the new members that they may 
hear the reasons given by the older heads, and 
then they would vote more understaDdingly— 
I should, I know. As the matter is tonight 
I must vote against it. I have the utmost confi- 
dence in the eentleman from "Ward 12, who is an 
engineer, and he has met my ideas of this water 
business. But there are other gentlemen who 
think they are engineers, and tell about building- 
sewers, and I think they know less about it than 
the gentleman who has given his views here to- 
night, and I am willing to take his word. 



Mr. Howes of Ward 11— I trust some action may 
be taken tonight. From the very nature of the 
case it is utterly impossible for many members to 
know anything of the matter personally. Wh at- 
ever we know comes from the engineers. The sub- 
ject has been under discussion two years, and 
there are large documents containing details of 
all the schemes proposed. If gentlemen wished to 
post themselves they have had time during the 
astfew years. 

Mr. Fitzgerald— I hope nothing will be done this 
evening, and if the gentleman last up desires to 
go it blind, I do not. I do not propose to indorse 
the report of the ccminittee or an engineer until 
I have examined it. I understand that this con- 
duit will not be finished for two years, so that the 
delay of a week or two will make no difference in 
the procuring of the water. I am heartily in fa- 
vor of bringing an adequate supply of water to 
Boston, but 1 submit that there is no occasion for 
ruslliLgit through. I want to vote for it, and I 
think I shall be better prepared after a week's 
delay than lam now. 

Mr. Sweetser of Ward 10— It is due to the mem- 
bers not posLed on this subject that the order 
should lie over. It should not be forced, and I 
hope it will be postponed till next Thursday, and 
that gentlemen will take pains topost themselves. 
If they will call on Mr. Davis I think they will 
learn something of the needs of the city that they 
do not know. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5—1 agree with the request 
of the gentleman from Ward 12, who is a minority 
of the committee, and for that reason I would 
support his motion. He is the only member of 
the committee who is an engineer by profession, 
and be has undertaken to give some reasons, and 
asks that it be postponed another week. I listened 
to everything said last year, but a majority of the 
Council did not. I see a member of the Council 
from the Sixth Ward [Mr. Crocker], get up here 
and at one fell swoop blot out of exiter.ee the 
gentleman's idea that a conduit can be built 
beside the old one, when an engineer of the 
city told me last year it could be done. I am pre- 
pared to vote for an appropriation for water sup- 
ply, but not tonight, when gentlemen make a re- 
quest to have it lie over, and I believe the people 
of Boston are in favor of giving him time. He 
has given new and substantial reasons tonight 
which are worthy of consideration. 

Mr. Howes of Ward 11— I wish to say that in 
what I said I had no intention of conveying the 
idea thac I was willing to go it blind in this mat- 
ter. But it is a subject upon which we have to 
go it blind, so to speak. Probably the gentleman 
from Ward 12 is the only one who has any knowl- 
edge of engineering, and is able to judge of it 
from practical information. What I meant to 
say was that all our evidence must necessarily be 
cumulative. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6 — I don't know that the 
gentleman from Ward 5 meant me, but I am 
confident I did not say it was impossible 
to build a conduit beside the old one. 
What I did say was, I considered that 
it would be unsafe to attempt to build 
one by the side of the old one, and if it was built, 
that both conduits would be in an unsafe condi- 
tion. I enforced my argument by referring to that 
of the gentleman from Ward 12, who said 
you could build a sewer beside another 
one, because it was done every day, and there 
is no trouble. These are two very different matters. 
If the gentleman from Ward" 12 believes that a 
conduit beside the old one will be no more unsafe 
than one sewer beside another, I think we have 
evidence enough to show that he is mis- 
taken. The sewer has but little water, the 
conduit has 20,000,000 gallons, passing through it 
daily; if the sewer breaks no great farm is done; 
if the conduit breaks an immense amount of mis- 
chief will be done before the water can be shut 
off. That one conduit could be built beside an- 
other I have no doubt. 

The motion to specially assign prevailed. 

» BADGES. 

The motion for the reconsideration of the vote 
whereby was rejected the order lor the appoint- 
ment of a special committee to procure badges 
for such members of the Common Council as de- 
sire them, at a cost not to exceed $15 for each 
badge, was considered under the head of unfin- 
ished business, and on motion of Mr. Flynn of 
Ward 7, the subject was specially assigned to 
Thursday next, at 8 o'clock, P. M. 



FEBRUARY 11, 1875 



56 



ELECTIONS. 

The following- elections were held. 

Superintendent of Common and Public Grounds. 
Messrs. Noyes o t Ward 5, Perkins of Ward 16, 
and Sibley of Ward 20 were appointed a commit- 
tee to collect and count votes. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 16— Before proceeding to 
this election I desire to state that I understand 
that a letter has heeu written either to the com- 
mittee who made this nomination [Mr. John Gal- 
vin] or else to the chairman of the Committee on 
the Common, by some one of the gentlemen 
who sent a petition for the election of 
Mr. Hermann Grundel to the position of 
Superintendent of Common and Public Grounds, 
desiring to withdraw his recommendation 
for Mr. Grundel, and it has been stated 
around city hall and among the people that the 
reasons which induced him to take that action 
were such that would preclude any gentleman 
who had not made a thorough investigation of all 
the facts in the case from voting for Mr. Grundell 
for this position. Such being the fact, and as I 
desire to have fair play prevail in this matter, 
and it being what I conceive to be the ordinary 
dictates of fair play, I wish to "tate that I have in 
my possession letters from Mr. Horatio Harris, Mr. 
E. F. Parker and Mr. F. A. Howard, some of whom, 
if not all, are well known to the members of the 
Council, which are in the strongest degree com- 
mendatory of the honesty, capacity and ability of 
Mr. Grundel to fill this position As an act of 
justice to Mr. Grundel under the circumsiances, 
and that every member of this Council may un- 
derstand this matter and act with a full knowl- 
edge of all the facts, J would respectfully beg 
leave from the Council to read these letters. Mr. 
Harris writes, under date of Feb. 10— 

Mr, Flj nn of Ward 7 — I would inquire to whom 
those letters are addiessed. 

JVir. Perkins — They are addressed to any gentle- 
man who desires to know the ti uth in regard to 
this matter. 

Mr. Flynn— My point is that if they are private 
letters addressed to any member of the Council, 
tney are noi in order to be read. 

The President— The Chair rules that if objec- 
tion is made, unless the gentleman shows that the 
letters are in the nature of a public communica- 
tion, the reading of them is out of order. 

Mr. Feikins — Can 1 send them to the Chair aud 
have them read for the benefit of the Council? 

The President — Unless they are shown to be in 
the nature of public communications they cannot 
be read if objection is made. 

Mr. Perkins — Does the gentleman from Ward 7 
maintain his objections? 

Mr Flynn— I do. 

The ballot resulted as follows: 

Whole numbf r of votes cast 65 

Necessary to a choice 33 

John Galvin had 41 

Hermann Grundel 24 

And Mr. Galvin was declared elected. Certifi- 
cate sent up. 

Superintendent of Public Buildings. Messrs 
Willcutt of Ward 17, Whitmore of Ward 4, 
and Thacher of Ward 15 were the committee to 
collect and count votes. They reported — 

Whole number of votes 60 

Necessary for a choice , 31 

James C. Tucker 59 

And one ballot for Robert W. Hall, Super- 
intendent of Public Lands. 
And Mr. Tucker was declared elected. Certificate 
sent up. 

Harbor Master. Messrs. Duggan of Ward 5, 
Day of Ward 1, and Beal of Ward 16 were the com- 
mittee to collect and count votes. They re- 
ported — 

Whole number of votes 49 

Necessary to a choice 25 

John T. Gardner 48 

George A. Shaw 1 

And Mr. Gardner was declared elected. Cer- 
tificate sent up. 

City Surveyor. Messrs. Walbridge of Ward 12, 
Howes of Ward 11 , and Coyle of Ward 13 were the 
committee to collect and count votes. They re- 
ported — 

Whole number of votes 45 

Necessary to a choice 23 

Thomas-W. Davis 44 

W. F. Davis 1 

And Mr. Davis was elected. Certificate sent up. 

Superintendent of Streets. Messrs. Morrisoi) of 
Ward 9, Lappen of Ward 12 and Hicks of Ward 8 
were the committee to collect and co-vnt votes. 
They reported — 

Whole number of votes 44 

Necessary for a choice 23 

Charles Harris had 43 

Charles B. Bickford 1 



And Mr. Harris was declared elected. Certificate 

sent up. 
Superintendent of Public Lands. Messrs. Page 

of Ward 9, Goldthwait of Waid 11, and Harrigan 

of Ward 1 were the committee to collect and 

count votes. They reported- 
Whole number of votes 46 

Necessary for a choice 24 

Robert W. Hall 46 

And Mr. Hall was declared elected. Certificate 

sent up. 
City Engineer. Messrs. Anderson of Ward 3, 

Leighton of Ward 1, and Stacey of Ward 21 were 

the committee to collect and count votes. They 

reported- 
Whole number of votes 43 

Necessary to a choice 22 

Joseph P. Davis had 42 

William H. Bradley .• 1 

And Mr. Davis was declared elected. Certificate 
sent up. 

Superintendent of Common Sewers. Messrs. 
Shaw of Ward 5, Kingsley of Ward 3, and Os- 
borne of Ward 8 were the emmittee to collect 
and count votes. They reported — 

Whole number ot votes 43 

Necessary to a choice 22 

William H. Bradley 37 

Charles D. Bickford 6 

And Mr. Bradley was declared elected. Certifi- 
cate sent up. 

Commissioner of Cedar Grove Cemetery. 
Messrs. Clarke of Ward 15, Cushman of Ward 1, 
and Collins of Ward 2 were the committee to col- 
lect and count votes. They reported — 

Whole number of votes 44 

Necessary for a choice 23 

Frank L. Tileston had 39 

Thomas J. Anderson 2 

John H. Haven 3 

And Mr. Tileston was declared elected. Certificate 
sent up. 

Water Registrar. Messrs. Train of Ward 13, 
Leighton of Ward 1, and Harmon of Ward 6 were 
the committee to collect and count votes. They 
reported — 

Whole number of votes 41 

Necessary for a choice ' 22 

William F. Davis had 40 

Amos L. Noyes 1 

And Mr. Davis was declared elected. Certificate 
sent up. 

City Solicitor. Messrs. Crocker of Ward 6, 
Walsh of Ward 5, and Damon of Ward 12 were 
the committee to collect and count votes. They 
reported- 
Whole number of votes 44 

Necessary to a choice 23 

John P. Healy had 38 

Uriel H. Crocker 3 

George A. Shaw 2 

John A. Duggan 1 

And Mr. Healy was declared elected. Certificate 
sent up. 

First Assistant Assessors. Certificate of the 
election by the Board of Aldermen of 33 first as- 
sistant assessors. On motion of Mr. Page of Ward 
9, the committee to collect and count votes con- 
sisted of five members instead of the usual num- 
ber, three. The President appointed Messrs. 
Flynn of Ward 7, Brackett of Ward 10, Jaques of 
Ward 9, Kimball of Ward 6, and Cawley of Ward 
2. They reported — 

Whole number of votes cast 64 

Necessary to a choice 33 

William J . Ellis 61 

John Noble 62 

George D. Ricker ; 52 

John Brown 55 

Horace Loring 59 

Charles E. Jackson 43 

P. Ambrose Young 62 

William H. Cunay 60 

Edward F. Robinson 64 

Theophilus Burr 61 

George F. Williams 62 

Otis Rich 62 

Joseph R. Grose 60 

Ed win B. Spinney 58 

Joseph L. Drew 61 

John H. Giblin 59 

L. Foster Morse 60 

George F. Davis 43 

Andrew J. Browne 63 

George A. Comins 60 

Phineas B. Smith 60 

William Wi thington 62 

Henry Pierce 62 

John Pierce 62 

Charles Nowell 56 

Gideon Walker 57 

Henry W. Dickerman 62 

Joshua S. Duncklee 61 

William B. Long 62 

Nahum Chapin 63 

George S. Pendergast 64 

James K. Crowley 27 

Abraham G. Wyman 55 



57 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



Michael Carney 61 

Charles F. McDavitt 13 

A. R. Hnldeu 21 

James Healey 5 

Roger H. Scannell 17 

George H. Williams 9 

Isaac F. Atwood. . . 3 

Thomas L. Jenks 8 

Horatio N. Holbrook 2 

Peter Mulvey 1 

Edwin R. Spinney 1 

Roger Kelly 1 

Galium Cauen 1 

John Conley 1 

Samuel S. Cudworth 2 

The following named gentlemen were declared 
elected in concurrence: William J. Ellis, John 
Noble, George D. Ricker, TbeophilusBurr, P. Am- 
brose Young, John Brown, Edwin B. Spinney, 
Horace Loring. Joseph L. Drew, Charles E. Jack- 
son, John H. Giblin, Abraham G. Wy man, Wil- 
liam H. Cundy, Charles Nowell, Edward F. Robin- 
son, George F. Williams, Otis Rich, Joseph R. 
Grose, L. Foster Morse, Andrew J. Browne, 
George A. Comins, Phineas B. Smith, William 
Withmgton, Henry Pierce, John Pierce, Gideon 
Walker, Henry W~. Dickerman, Joshua S. Dunck- 
lee, Nabuin Chapin, George S. Pendergast, Wil- 
liam B. Pong, George F. Davis. 

And Michael Carney was declared elected in 
non-concunvnce. Certificate sent up. 

BEQUESTS FROM THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Communications from the School Committee 
were received covering requests for additional ac- 
commodations for the Bigelow School District; 
for an appropriation of $400 for a room for teach- 
ing gymnastics in the Latin School; for fitting up 
the basement ot the Roxbury High School build- 
ing for a laboratory ; for provision for an addition- 
al room in the schoolbouse on Boston street, Ward 
16. 

Severally referred to the Joint Committee on 
Public Instruction. Sent up. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 

The annual report of the City Engineer (City 
Doc. No. 19) was ieceived and sent up. 

The expenditures from the department and 
other appropriations were $35,014.31 ; balance of 
appropriation Jan 1, $11,946.69. 

The aveiage daily consumption from the Co- 
chituate works for each mouth of the past year 
has been as follows : 



Gallons. 

January 16,651,300 

February 19,103,850 

March 17,657,300 

April 15,929,600 

May 16,731,900 

June 19,239,750 



Gallons. 

July 21,386,200 

August 20,127,800 

September 20,022,600 

October 19,320,! 00 

November 14,319,500 

December 16,407,950 



The average daily consumption for the year 
from the Cochituate works has been 18,074,900 gal- 
lons. 

During November and December, 57,191,258 gal- 
lons were supplied to the city proper from the 
Mystic works; equivalent to an average daily 
supply of 1,468,578 gallons in November, and 423,- 
675 gallons m December, and to an average daily 
supply of 156,690 gallons for the year. The Ja- 
maica Pond works supply from two to three hun- 
dred thousand gallons per day (say 250,000), to its 
consumers in Roxbury; hence the average daily 
consumption for the year in the city proper, South 
Boston, Dorchester and a part of Roxbury has 
been about 18,482,600 gallons. 

ICY SIDEWALKS. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6, for the Joint Commit- 
tee on Ordinances, who were requested to con- 
sider and report what change is needed in the 
ordinances to better protect the sidewalks from 
ice, submitted a report recommending the pas- 
sage of the accompanying ordinance: 

An Ordinance to amend an ordinance in relation 
to streets. 

Be it ordained, etc., 

Section 1. The ordinance in relation to sti eets 
is hereby amended by striking out in the tenth 
line of the fifty-first section the words "cover the 
same," and inserting in the place thereof the 
words "keep the same covered." 

The ordinance was passed to a second reading. 

Mr. Cawley of Ward 2 — Will the gentleman be 
kind enough to explain the ordinance? 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6— It is in relation to keep- 
ing the sidewalks covered with ashes. The present 
ordinance provides that either the ice shall be 
removed from the sidewalks or be covered with 
ashes. It has been found that if a man puts ashes 
on the ice once, even if the wind blows it off, he 
cannot be complained of and fined. The object is 
to require parties to keep their sidewalks covered 
with ashes when there is ice on them. 

Mr. Page of Ward 9— In order that members 
may have time to examine this amendment and 



compare it with the original ordinance, I move 
that the ordinance be laid upon the table till the 
next meeting. 
The motion prevailed. 

REPORTS OF NOMINATING COMMITTEES. 

Reports of nominating committees were sub- 
mitted as follows : 

By Mr. Walbridge of Ward 12— Majority report 
nominating for reelection the fobowing-i.amed 
persons as Superintendents of Bridges: 

Federal street, Jacob Norris ; Dover street, An- 
gus Nelson ; Chelsea street, Edward T. Stowers; 
Maiden, John Howard; Meridian street, Reuben 
B.Wendell; Warren, Charles H. Marple; Charles 
River, Joel R. Bolan; Broadway, John C. Poole; 
Mt. Washington avenue, George H. Davis. 

Also minority report signed by Messrs. Fitz- 
patrick of Ward 7 and Orborne oi Ward 8 recofn- 
mendinff the election of Francis M. Hughes as 
Superintendent of Dover-street Bridge in place of 
Ana-us Nelson. 

Bv Mr. Murray of Ward 3— Report recommend- 
ing the reelection of Nicholas A." Apollonio as City 
Registrar. 

Reports severally accepted andnominntions laid 
over. 

PRINTING. 

Mr. Wadsworth, for the Joint Committee on 
Priutinp;, to whom was lef erred the order for the 
Clerk jf the Council to prepare and print a tran- 
script of the journal ot the Council, submitted a 
report that the published proceedings supply 
members with all necessary information, and that 
the order ought njt to pass. Report accepted. 
Sent up. 

Also report on order to print in document form 
a book entitled, "Cty Charter," with notes, etc., 
that the order ought to pass. Report accepted 
and order passed. Sent up. 

FOURTH OF JULY. 

Mr. Havrigan of Ward 1 offered the following: 
Ordered, That one member of the Council from 
each ward, with such as the Board of Aldermen 
may join, be a committee to make arrangements 
for the celebration of the forthcoming Fourth of 
July ; the expense of said celebration not to ex- 
ceed $15,000, and to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for Incidental Expenses. 

Laid on the table, on motion of Mr. Page of 
Ward 9. 

BUILDING OF SWETT STREET. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on 
Streets be and they are hereby authorized to con- 
tract for the construction of Swett street from 
Albany street to Dorchester avenue at the grade 
shown on a plan prepared by Thomas W. Davis, 
City Surveyor, dated June 13, 1874, including the 
necessary bridges over tide waters; and also to 
coutract with tbe Trustees of the Boston, Hart- 
ford & Erie Railroad or such other paities as they 
deem best for the interest of the city for raising 
the grade of the roadbed and tracks of said rail- 
road, and constructing a bridge over said street; 
the expense to be charged to the appropriation 
for Laying Out and Buildina: Swett Street. 
Ordered to a second reading. 

REDI VISION OF THE WARDS. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 4 offered the following : 
Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to amend the petition concerning the number 
of wards, now before the Legislature, so that after 
the new devisiou of the wards each ward shall 
elect two members of the Common Council and 
two members of the School Committee. 
Laid on the table, on motion of Mr. Whitmore. 

BRIGHTON BRANCH LIBRARY. 

Mr Rice of Ward 19 offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Trustees of the Public Li- 
brary cause to be printed an account of the recent 
proceedings at the dedication of the Brighton 
Branch Library. 

Ordered to a second reading. 

Mr. Page of Ward 9 — I would inquire what spe- 
cial reason there is for printing the proceedings at 
tbe dedication of the library there, and how much 
it will probably cost. 

Mr. Rxe of Ward 19 — I do not know what will 
be the cost. I was requested co offer the order by 
a gentleman out there. It has been customary in 
other cases to print the proceedings. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6— As that is an order 
which requires the Trustees of the Public Library 
to print the proceedings without any discretion 
whatever, I move its reference to the Joint Com- 
mittee or Public Library. 

The motion prevailed.' Sentut). 

On motion of Mr. Parker of Ward 14, the Coun- 
cil adjourned. 



BOARD OF ALDKKMEN 



58 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceeding's of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY 15, 1875. 



Regular weekly meeting at four o'clock P. M., 
Alderman Clark, Chairman, presiding. 

EXECUTIVE NOMINATIONS CONFIRMED. 

Undertakers — Constant T. Benson, Lewis Jones, 
John W. Pierce, Job T. Cole, William H. Brown, 
Benjamin P. Smith, Philip E. Field, John H. 
Peak, Jeremiah O'Sullivan, William E. Brown, 
James Hayues. Robert S. G. Marclen, Hugh Tay- 
lor, Jeremiah Xinkham, William D. Rockwood, 
Ira W. Orcutt, Philip Kennedy, George V. Field, 
Joseph S. Waterman, William Manning, John 
Heintz, John Haynes, James Farrell, Ebenezer 
Bird, John W. Lavery, S. Gleason, George John- 
son, Jr., Samuel J. Crockett, James Cotter, George 

A. Willard, John B. Burke, Lewis L. Jones, John 
Feeney, John McCaffiey, Jabez B. Cole, Aloi.zo T. 
Baxter, Alexis Alexander, Simon Barry, Joseph 

B. Cassidv, Joseph Weckerle, E\ H. Dunne, Isaiah 
Snow, J. P. Keefe, William K. Whitney, Timothy 
Daly, John Doolin, Bernard E. Murray, Ethan N. 
Coburn, John Bryant, Patrick Denvir, John 
Reade, Matthew Hoi den, Benjamin Guild, James 
Cogswell, Jerome Billings, John L. Perry, Lorenzo 
Smith, Michael Ryan. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark— B. G. Prescott» 
Robert Hale, Alfred A. Hall, Stanley C. Burnhani; 
William Jordan, Robert Vose, Ebenezer Curtis- 
William Seaver, H. W. Ciafts, Daniel E. Adams* 
Jonathan Frohock, J. T. Dalrymple ; for Brighton , 
Salma Kendall, William T. Oborn, James A. 
Coggeshall; for Charlestown, Thomas J. Elliott, 
Elbudge Walcott, Charles A. Guild, Samuel L. 
Tuttle, John G. Abbott, Jr., John W. Wiggin ; for 
West Boxbury, Robert Seaver, Frederic Seaver, 
Cyrus M. Marshall, Horace Lindall, Aldeii Bart- 
lett. 

Inspectors and Weighers of Bundle Hay — Israel 
M. Barnes, Samuel B. Livermore, William S. 
Holmes, Jasper H. Eaton, William R. Inman, E. 
G. Dudley, Walter C. Bryant, J. T. Dalrymple, E. 
W. Harding, Ebenezer Curtis, Aarou Bradshaw, 
William P. Boardman, John A. Dyer. 

Sui veyors of Marble, Soapstone and Freestone — 
William B. Bayley, Augustus N. Young, E. A. 
Grothusen, Richard Power, William H. Cary. 

Inspectors of Petroleum and Coal Oils— Robert 
F. Means, Nathaniel Cleaves. 

Superintendent of Lamps— George H. Allen. 

Superintendent of Faneuil Hall — Charles B. 
Rice. 

Sinn rintendent of Faneuil Hall Market— Charles 

B. Rice. 

Inspector of Milk— Henry Faxon. 

Superintendents of Hay Scales — North Scales, 
Henry A. Dfvis; South Scales, Levi Chadbourue; 
South Boston Scales, John M. Johnson; East Bos- 
ton Scales, John A. Brown; Roxbury, Andrew 
W. Newman ; Brighton, Daniel O. Sanger, Thomas 
Hunt; for West Roxbury, John J. Blake. 

Measurer of Grain — George P. Ray. 

Inspectors of Provisions— Faneuil Hall Market, 
Charles B. Rice, Amos Dodge; at large, John H. 
Terry. 

Registrar of Voters — Linus E. Pearson, for three 
years. 

Superintendent of Wagons and Trucks— Timo- 
thy R. Page. 

Superintendent of Hacks and Carriages— Ruf us 

C. Marsh. 

Superintendent of Intelligence Offices— Henry 
C. Hemmenway. 

Superintendent of Pawnbrokers— Wdliam H. 
McCausland. 

Lieutenant of Police— William H. McCausland. 

Promo tions in the Police Department— Joseph 
R. Buriill, to be Lieutenant; George O. Richard- 
son and Ebenezer E. Thomas, to be Sergeants. 

Special Police Officer— Franklin P. Pierce. 

STEAM ENGINE. 

The petition of Charles H. Bacon, for leave to 
locate and use steam engine and boiler of 40-horse 
power in rear of 486 Harrison avenue, was consid- 
ered on an order of notice. No one appeared to 
object and the petition was referred to the Com- 
mittee on Steam Engines. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Joint Committee on Claims. S. T. Hyde, 
that his claim of $30 for professional service's be 
allowed and paid. 



Patrick M. Kellaher, to be paid for damages 
caused by alleged defect in a public street. 

Henry McDonald et al., to be compensated for 
damages caused by an obstructed culvert on 
Washington street, Ward 17. 

Charles McGinness of South Boston, to be paid 
the reward offered for the detection of the mur- 
derer of Katie Curran. 

To the Joint Committee on Treasury Depart- 
ment. Overseer s of the Poor, for leave to take 
and copy the tax records of the town of Brighton. 

To the Committee on Market. Roger S. Mack- 
intosh, for leave to transfer lease of stall 105, 
Faneuil Hall Market, to Joseph H. Clark. 

To the Joint Committee on Armories. Com- 
pany K, First Infantry, for an appropriation for 
repairs on armory. 

First Company of' Cadets, for hire of drill shed 
of Institute of Technology. 

To the Cmnmitee on Police. Boston Police Re- 
lief Association, for leave to apply for an act of 
incorporation. 

To the Committee on Streets on the part of the 
Board. Thomas Hunt, for revision of betterment 
assessed on Market stieet, Ward 19. 

To the Committee on County Accounts. Henry 
P. Kennedy, constable at Brighton Court, tor in- 
crease of salary. 

To the Committee on Paving. Heirs of Hardy 
Leach, for abatement of sidewalk as.-essment at 
376 Chelsea street. 

Margaret Denvir, to be paid for grade damages 
on Market street, Brighton. 

Samuel H. Smith, for leave to place a lamp post 
in sidewalk of 80 Tremont street. 

Frank L. Crosby, for leave to locate a gas lamp 
in front of 57 La Grange street. 

South Boston Railroad Company, foi a new lo- 
cation, commencing in Beach street at the junction 
of Kingston street, thence in Kingston street over 
tracks of Metropolitan Railroad Company to Sum- 
mer street, and in Summer stieet over said Metro- 
politan track to a point near Chauncy street, and 
thence in Summer street by an additional track in 
Summer street to Washington street, and in Wash- 
ington street by au additional track to Milk street, 
and in Milk street by a single track to Hawley 
street, and in Hawley street by a single track to 
Summer street, there connecting with the track 
now laid in Summer and Chauncy streets. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Orders to pay heirs of Joshua Bennett $8248 for 
Auburn street damages and $2935.50 for Leverett- 
street damsges to pay William R. Howe $672.25 
for Shawmut- avenue damages; to pay heirs of 
Joseph M. Smith $971.25 for Pearl-street damages. 
Severally passed. 

Order to discharge a mortgage given by Eben- 
ezer Seaver to the town of Roxbury in 1795. 
Passed. 

THE SALARY BILL. 

The report and orders to establish salaries for 
city officers for 1875-76 (City Doc. No. 22.), were 
consirfered under the head of unfinished business. 
-The several sections of the orders were read and 
acted upon separately. The following discussions 
took place: 

Section 5 (page 9), relating to monthly payment 
of assistant* to the City Registrar. In reply to a 
question by Alderman Har«is, who thought the 
repetition of the words "paid monthlv" superflu- 
ous, Alderman Stebbins explained that the ex- 
pression was repeated to show that the assistants 
as well a*: the R-gistrar were to be paid monthly. 

Section 13 (page 12), fixing salary of Superin- 
tendent of Broadway Bridge at the rate of $3200 
per annum, in full for his services and the servi- 
ces of such assistants as he may employ, and 
providing that he shall employ an engineer 
at $800 and two assistants at $600 each. Alder- 
man Worthington thought this a rather singular- 
ly framed order, and not sufficiently explicit. 

Alderman Stebbins said the order was drawn in 
that way so that this superintendent shall employ 
these assistants, and their salaries were iixed in 
orc'tr ti secure competent men. This is an im- 
portant bridge and it was desirable to secure the 
employment of sufficient and competent assist- 
ance to the superintendent. The salaries are the 
same as last year. 

Alderman Stebbins offered the following as an 
amendment to the order beginning om page 10, 
explaining that it had been omitted through a» 
error : 

Section 34. The salary of the Superintendent of 
Maiden Bridge shall be at the rate of $1000 per 
annum, said sum to be in full compensation for 
his services and the services of such assistants as 
he may employ. 



59 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



This section was adopted and the several orders 
were then passed aud sent down. 

Alderman Stebbins, for the Committee on Sala- 
ries, submitted the following: 

Ordered, That, until otherwise ordered, the sal- 
ary of the Fourth Assistant Solicitor in the Law 
Department shall be at the rate of $2500, begin- 
ning on the date of his appointment. 

Read twice and passed and s?nt down. 

Alderman Power— I notice that the name of one 
of the most important and valuable officers of the 
city has been omitted by the committee — the Au- 
ditor of Accounts. 

Alderman Stebbins— That is alluded to in the 
first part of the report. The salaries of the Treas- 
urer and Auditor were omitted until after the 
proposed reorganization of the financial depart- 
ment. 

Alderman Power — I was not aware that there 
was any proposition for the reorganization of the 
Auditors' Department. 

Alderman Stebbins — The salaries of the Treas- 
urer and Auditor will continue as at present until 
otherwise provided. By an order of the City Coun- 
cil his Honor the Mayor has petitioned the Gen- 
eral Court for authority to reorganize the finan- 
cial department. It may affect the Auditors' De- 
partment, and the committee were of the opinion 
that the matter of the salaries of the Treasurer 
and Auditor had better be omitted for the pres- 
ent. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COU-N'CIX FOR COSt 
CURRENCE. 

Report that older to print the separate join nal 
of the proceedings of Common Council ought not 
to pass. Accepted. 

Report witli order to print 1000 copies of docu- 
ments relating to the new charter. Order passed. 

Order for Committee on Ordinances to consider 
and report an ordinance to unite the Cochituate 
and Mystic water bocii'ds. 

Alderman Harris — The official leport of the 
doings of the Common Council does not contain 
this order, and, therefore, I have not seen it in 
print. I would like to move to amend the order 
so that the committee will merely consider the ex- 
pediency of uniting the two boards. A.s I under- 
stand it now, the order is absolute for them to 
report an ordinance. What I desire is for them to 
consider the expediency of it. 

Alderman Stebbins— It seems to me that the 
point is well covered by theoider. They are to 
consider the matter, and if , in their judgment, it 
inexpedient, they will report the ordinance. 

Alderman Quincy — As one of the Committee on 
Ordinances, I should hardly consider that we 
would be justified in reporting that no action is 
advisable. I should like some such amendment as 
was suggested by the Alderman to be adopted, 
that the committee may consider the expediency 
of reporting an ordinance to that effect. 

Alderman Stebbins— If the question is to con- 
sider the expediency of the matter, it seems to 
me that it had better go to the Committee on 
Water. This matter was before the Committee 
on Water last year ; they thoroughly investigated 
it and reported back an ordinance in accordance 
with the provisions of the statute passed at the 
last session of the Legislature. That ordinance 
was passed by the Board, of Alderin n, but failed 
to meet the approval of the other branch of 
the City Council. It seems to me that there 
can be no question as to the expediency of 
the measuie, and I hope it will go to the 
committee for them to report an ordinance. It 
will then be thfl right of the City Council to reject 
or pass the ordinance after it is reported. If they 
are simply to consider the expediency of the meas- 
ure, I do not know what right 'they would have to 
report an ordinance. I think the order had better 
pass as it now reads. 

Alderman Worthington — I think the amendment 
proposed by the gentleman is right. Last year, it 
is true, this subject was considered by the Com- 
mittee on Water : they reported an ordinance, and 
a portion of the City Council disagreed with them. 
Now, let us refer it to another and an indepen- 
dent committee, and let them consider it. I do not 
want to repeat what was done last jear. If we 
adopt the amendment of the gentleman from 
Charlestown we shall have the committee investi- 
gate the whole subject and report their opinion, 
which I think will have an influence with the 
City Council. I hope the amendment will be 
adopted. 

Alderman Quincy— I desire to have it clearly 
understood what the Committee on Ordinances 



are expected to do. It is not clear as the order 
stands now; they are simply required to "con- 
sider and report an ordinance." If we are to con- 
sider the whole matter, I think the order should 
say so. 

The order was amended by inserting after the 
words "consider and report," the words "if 
deemed expedient," and as amended was passed. 
Sent down. 

Requests of School Committee for additional ac- 
commodations for the Bigelow School; tor an ap- 
propriation of $400, for teaching gymnastics in the 
Latin School; that the basement of the Roxbury 
High Schoolhouse be converted into a laboratory; 
for an additional schoolroom in home on Boston 
street, Ward 16; for additional primary schools in 
Comins District. Severally referred to the Com- 
mittee on Public Instruction. 

Report nominating N. A. Apollonio as City Reg- 
istrar. Accepted 

Annual report of City Engineer (City Doc. No. 
19). Placed on file. 

An order to print the proceedings at the recent 
dedication of the Brighton Branch Library came 
up referred to the Committee on the Libi ary. The 
question was on concurrence. 

Alderman Worthington — I understand that the 
proposal to print the proceedings at the dedica- 
tion of the Brighton Branch Library is based on 
the same grounds as the printing of the exercises 
at the opening of the Dorchester branch. The 
difference is this : The proceedings at Brighton 
consisted of an address, going very largely and at 
great length in ro the history of that library. At 
Dorchester the proceedings were intended to en- 
lighten the people of Dorchester with regard to 
the Public Library of Boston, and the facilities 
enjoyed by the people there and throughout Bos- 
ton. ' The address at Brighton was an able one, 
though very long, as you all remember and every 
one who heard it knows, and it will cost a great 
deal to print it. 

In reoly to a question by Alderman Worthing- 
ton, the Chairman said the committee would con- 
sider the expediency of printing the proceedings. 

The Board concurred in toe reference. 

Order to allow and pay $65 as rent for a tempo- 
rary armorv for Company C, Fourth Battalion of 
Infantry. Passed— yeas 12, nays 0. 

Majoiity and minority reports of special com- 
mittee nominating superintendents of the sever- 
al bridges which are controlled by the city. Ac- 
cepted. 

ELECTIONS. 

The following elections occurred: 

First Assistant Assessors. Certiticate of election 
of Michael Carney by the Common Council, in 
place of James K. Crowley, chosen by the Board. 
Alderman Power said he had been requested to 
withdraw the name of Mr. Crowley as a candidate. 
Aldermen O'Biien and Burrage w'eie the commit- 
tee to collect and count votes. They reported— 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary for a choice 7 

Michael Carney had 10 

Michael Barr 1 

Blank 1 

And Mr. Carney was declared elected in concur- 
rence. 

Member of the Cochituate Water Board. Cer- 
tificate of election by the Council of Amos L. 
Noyes in place of Uriel H. Crocker, elected by this 
Board. Aldermen Viles and Bigelow were the 
committee to collect and count votes. They re- 
ported — 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Amos L. Noyes 3 

Uriel H. Crocker » 

And Mr. Crocker was declared elected in non-con- 
currence. Certificate sent down. 

Superintendent of Streets. Aldermen Pope and 
Worthington were the committee to collect and 
count votes. They reported that Charles Harris 
had received 12 votes, and he was declared elected 
in concurrence. 

City Surveyor. Aldermen Pope and Harris were 
the committee to collect and count votes. They 
reported that Thomas P. Davis had received 12 
votes, and he was declared elected in concurrence. 

Harbor Master. Aldermen Prescott and Quincy 
were the committee to collect and count rotes. 
Thev reported that John T. Gardner had received 
12 votes, and he was declared elected in concur- 

Jt'GHCC 

Superintendent of Common and Public Grounds. 
Aldermen Stebbins and Power were the commit- 
tee to collect and count votes. They reported— 



PEBRUAEY 15, 1875 



60 



Whole number of votes 18 

Necessary for a choice 7 

John Galvin 7 

Hermann Grundel 4 

F. M. Safford 1 

And Mr. Galvin was declared elected in concur- 
rence. 

Superintendent of Public Buildinqs. Aldermen 
O'Brien and Viles were the committee to collect 
and comic votes, and they reported that James C. 
Tucker had 12 votes, and he was declared 
elected in concurrence. 

Superintendent of Sewers. Aldermen Eigelcw 
and Burrage were the committee to collect and 
count votes. They reported that William H. 
Bradley na-' received 12 votes, and he was de- 
clared elected in concurrence. 

Superintendent of Public Lands. Aldermen 
Worthington and Pope were the committee to 
eolle< t and count votes. They reported that 
Robert W. Hall had received 12 votes, and he 
was declared elected in concurrence. 

Commissioner on Cedar Grove Cemetery. Al- 
dermen Prescott and Harris were the committee 
to collect and count votes. They reported that 
Frank L. Tileston had received 12 votes, and he 
was declared elected in concurrence. 

City Solicitor. Aldermen Stebbins and Quincy 
were' che committee to collect and count votes. 
They reported that John P. Healy had received 
11 votes — the whole number cast,— and he was 
declared elected in concurrence. 

City Engineer. Aldermen Power and Viles were 
the committee to collect and count votes. They 
reported that Joseph P. Davis had received 12 
votee, and he was declared elected in concurrence. 
Water Registrar. Aldermen O'Brien and Steb- 
hins were the committee to collect and count 
votes. They reported that William P. Davis had 
received 12 Votes, and he was declared elected in 
concurrence. 

GASLIGHT FOR BRIGHTON. 

The following was receiver! and read : 

Boston, Feb. 15, 1875. 

To the Committee on Lamps of che City Council 
—The undersigned, representing the Brookline 
Gaslight Company, respectfully state that on and 
after Keb. 15, 1875, they will charge three dollars 
per thousand feet for gas furnished by them to 
the city of Boston. The company declines to sup- 
ply the city at any less price, for the reason that 
the gas manufactured by them costs not less than 
$3.09 per thousand feet." This estimate does not 
include interest on capital invested in land and 
buildings. Some years since, this company, at the 
request of the city authorities, laid more than two 
miles of pipes solely for the purpose of supplying 
street lights. A great- length of pipe was also laid 
in the town of Brighton for the same purpose. 
Theie are very few piivate -consumers of gas in 
the district referred to, and" the business has al- 
ways been done by the company at a considerable 
loss. For the coiporation, 

D. W. Salisbury, 

Treasurer. 

Referred; on motion of Alderman Power, to the 
Committee on Lamps. 

Subrequently Alaerman Stebbins, for the Com- 
mittee on Lamps, submitted a report on the above 
eormuuirication, recommending the passage of the 
accompanying order: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Lamps be and 
they are hereby authorized to contract with the 
Brookline Gaslight Company for supplying the gas 
for lighting the streets in the section of the city 
where their mains extend, at the rate of $3 per 
thousand cubic feet, from Feb. 15,1875. 

Akleiman Stebbins— i move that the order take 
its second leading at this time. The Committee 
on Lamps have had under consideration the com- 
munication read by the Chair, and they report it 
back this evening, because they think it is desir- 
able that the supplv of gas for Brighton shall be 
continued rather than to light that district with 
fluid lamps. Thert-^ are 269 lamps in Brighton 
and 62 in another portion of Boston— making 
a total of 331— supplied by the Brook line Gas 
Company. The company mean just vnat they 
say in their communication— that unless the 
city of Boston pays them very nearly what it 
costs to make the gas, they will cut off the supply 
today. The Committee on Lamps, after a careful 
•onsideration of the question, are of the opinion 
that a contract should be made with this corpora- 
tion at $3 per thousand feet, the same price as is 
paid in Dorchester and West Roxbury. The 
Biookline company, I am informed, have been 



very liberal with the city ; they have extended 
their mains, when asked to do so, at a very great 
expense, and the department has no complaint to 
make against this company for the manner in 
which it has furnished the city with gas. I hope 
the order will be passed so that the supply may be 
continued in Ward 19, and I ask that the vote may 
be taken by yeas and na>s. 

Alderman Worthington— I do not quite like the 
style in which this order comes here tonight. We 
have the whip snapped over us, and unless 
we vote to pay them three dollars they will shut 
off the light. Now they have supplied gas to the 
town of Brighton and the city of Boston at $2.75 
per thousand, and there is no Question but it is 
profitable to them to furnish it at that price. If 
we were to cut iff the g;.s and not light those 
lamps it would greatly reduce their income and 
profit — there is no question about that at all. If 
1 understand it, they manufacture a certain 
amount of gas at a cost of $3.09, and then they 
can make an aaditioral 10,000 feei which would 
not cost them near $3.09. It is a rule of the com- 
panies in all places to supply cities at a 
good deal less than they charge citizens. 
It is so in all cities in the Union. 
I believe it is the duty of the city of Boston to see 
that we have gas as low as they have been in the 
habit of supplying it heretofore, wLen the mate- 
rial used in manufacturing it was a good deal 
higher. A large portion of the town of Brookline 
is lighted with fluid, and lighted well, too. It will 
not be a very serious thing — on the contrary, it 
will be a saving— if we fight ttiose additional 
lamps with fluid. It is true we cannot light them 
tonight, but we can put up fluid 1 mps by tomor- 
row night. I do not believe in allowing i he city 
of Boston to be brought up by this short, crisp 
way of doing things ; that is not the way gentle- 
men deal with one another; it is nol fair lor cheui 
to say "we will have our price today, or cut off 
your gas," and I hope the Board will take a firm 
stand," and insist on having fair dealings between 
the Biookline Gas Company and the; city of Bos- 
ton. It is due to us to have time, and not have the 
order forced through here by taking its second 
reading ronight. It is not the way to do business. 

Alderman Stebbins— I agree with the Alderman 
that it is not a proper way to do business. The 
fault is not with the gas company, but with the 
city of Boston. The company made application for 
a renewal of the contract when it expired last 
August, at the same price as was paid the 
Dorchester and West Roxbury companies. The 
contracts with the other companies expired some- 
time before this one did, and the contracts with 
those companies were renewed at $3per thousand. 
The Brookline company made application to the 
Committee on Lamps for a renewal of the contract 
on the same terms as the others, but no quorum of 
the committee could be secured. Time after time 
was it attempted, but no hearing could be had 
before the committee. So it is notthe fault of the 
Brookline Gas Company, but with the city of Bos- 
ton. The present committee gave them a hearing 
early in the year, considered the matter carefully, 
anc voted to recommend the renewal of the con- 
tract at $3 per thousand feet. There are no fluid 
lamps in the town of Biighton; it will take sev- 
eral w eeks for the committee to procure a suffi- 
cient supply ; it will be necessary to secure the 
best pattern and have them made. Meantime the 
citizens of Brighton will be entirely without light, 
and of course they will feel very much grieved by 
the action of the City Government. It is the best 
judgment of the committee that the contract 
should be renewed at $3 per thousand feet. 

Alderman Harris— Cannot the contract be made 
for a less time than a year? 

Alderman Stebbins— I think the* uniform prac- 
tice of the city has been to make these contracts 
for one year unless either party notifies the other 
that it do-ires to terminate it. Such was the 
eontract made with the Dorchester company, and 
1 am informed that it is the same with the others. 
If it be the polLy of the city to light these outly- 
irg wards with fluid instead' of gas, let us apply it 
to West Roxbury and Dorchester . There is cer- 
tainly no argument against using gas in Brighton 
that is not applicable to Dorchester. 

Alderman Worthington — I do not like — 

The Chairman — The motion is to give the order 
a second reading today, and gentlemen must con- 
fine themselves to that question. 

Alderman Worthington — I do not consider that 
because we may have done wrong by giving the 
Doi Chester and West Roxbury companies $3, we 
should continue to do wrong. I said before that 



61 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



a part of Brookline is lighted with fluid lamps, 
and it is well lighted. Such lamps can be pur- 
chased at any time. 

The Chairman — The Chair would rule that a dis- 
cussion of the main question is out of order while 
the motion for a second reading is pending. 

Alderman Worthington — I am giving reasons 
why it should not take its second reading. 

Alderman Power — I am opposed to giving the 
order a second reading at this time, for the reason 
that it is unreasonable for a company, at the 
present tiint, when the price of coal, labor aud 
everything that enters into, or is to he considered 
in computing the cost of manufacturing gas — 

The Chairman — The Chair rules that the re- 
marks of the gentleman are not upon giving the 
order a second reading, hut upou the passage of 
the order, and he is therefore out of o>iler. 

Alderman Power — I do not like to differ with 
the Chair, but I cannot permit such a thing to 
pass, which I think so gross 1 y wrong, without ap- 
pealing from the decision of the Chair. 

The question was put and the Chair was sus- 
tained, by a rising vote— 7 for, 4 against. 

Th? order was given a second reading — yeas 10, 
nays 2; Aldermeu Power and Worthington voting- 
nay — and the question was upon its passage. 

Alderman Power — As I have remarked on a 
former occasion, I do_not think it is good policy 
for the city of Boston to light any part of the city 
with fluid lamps when it can obtain gas at a reason- 
able rate. But I agree with the Alderman on my 
left, and I do not think this a proper way for any 
company to come in here and notify us that they 
will cut off the light from the city of Boston, and 
deprive the citizens of it, even though we, their 
representatives, might have made a slight error. 
Grant that we are in error in the stand we have 
taken upon the subject, that is no reason why a 
company should deprive the citizens of Boston of 
the great luxuiy of light, which is the means of 
safety in the public streets, simply because of the 
stand we have taken. We should pause and look 
into the matter before we succumb to such an 
order. Now, as to the policy of a company asking 
$3 for gas when they have been furnishing it for 
years at $2.75, when everything used in manufac- 
turing it in the past costs double what it does today ; 
when almost every other commodity that citizens 
use has been lowered in price, it seems to me that 
such a demand is unreasonable. I cannot under- 
stand it. I cannot see any other pretext for it ex- 
cept that the Dorchester and West Roxbury compa- 
nies have received $3, and the Brookline company 
means to have it. I say that this thieat to deprive 
the citizens of Boston of this luxury, because we 
might have erred in our judgment, should make 
us pause and hesitate before we pass this order. 
They may come in tomorrow aud threaten to cut 
off the gas if we do not give them $4. We can.iot 
believe them. They must have been furnishing 
the city with gas at a great loss if they coins in 
now and say they cannot afford to make it for 
$2.75. There may be good reasons, perhaps the 
company can give them, why they cannot afford 
to fun ish gas for $2.75, but I have not heard good 
reason why their demands should be granted. I 
hope the order will not pass at the present time, 
but lie over. 

The order was passed— veas 10, yeas 2— Alder- 
men Power and Worthington votingnay. 

ACCOUKTS OF THE LATE TREASURER. 

Alderman Bigelow submitted the following : 

The Committee on the Treasury Department, in 
execution of the order of the City Council to ex- 
amine into the condition of the treasury after the 
death of the late Treasurer, beg leave to leport 
that they have caused a trial balance to be drawn 
eff, showing the state of the ledger on the evening 
©f January 15; that they have employed experi- 
enced accountants who, under their supervision, 
have examined and compared this trial balance 
with the books,, and have examined all the assets 
called for by said trial balance, except the cash, 
which was counted by the committee in person. 
All the accounts were found to be correct. The 
trial balance and copies of papers showing the 
details of the examination are ti an smitted here- 
with. The committee recommend the passage of 
the following : 

Ordered, That in consideration of the long and 
faithful sex vice of the late City Treasurer, Fred- 
erick IT. Tracy, his salary from the time of his 
death up to July 1, 1875, be paid to his widow and 
charged to the appropriation for Salaries. 

Order read twice and passed. Sent down. 



ASSESSORS TO VERIFY WARRANT OF TREASURER. 

Alderman Bigelow offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Committee on the Assessors' 
Department be requested to consider the expedi- 
ency of requiring the assessors of taxes to verify 
their warrant to the Treasurer f orjthe collection of 
taxes by adding up and proving the hooks known 
as the "Treasurer's Manusciipts." 
Read once. 

NORTHAMPTON-STREET DISTRICT/ 

Alderman Stebbins presented the report (City 
Doc. No. 25) on the Northarnpton-stieet district 
improvement, giving in detail the amount of work 
performed, etc. 

Satisfactory arrangements having been made 
with the abutters, the following streets 
were laid out by the Street Commissioners, upon 
the recommendation of the committee, namely : 
Newcomb street, from Washington street to Har- 
rison avenue, without expense; East Lenox street, 
from Washington street to Fellows street, at an 
estimated expense of $39,318.95; Thorndike street, 
from Washington street to Harrison avenue, at an 
estimated expense of $48,117; Hunneman street, 
from Harrison avenue to Altany street, at an esti- 
mated expense of $4982; Fellows street, from 
Northampton street to Hunnenoan street, without 
expense ; Reed street, from Northampton street to 
Thorndike street, without expense. For raising 
these streets above grade 12 the city paid the 
contractor at the rate ot $7.40 per square. 

As it was necessary to raise certain buildings in 
order to fill the lands, the owners were directed by 
an order ot the City Council, passed on the 28th of 
February, to do the work on or before the 15th of 
April. The buildings which had not been laised 
at that date were subsequently raised under con- 
tract with the city, and the expense charged to 
the estates, a= authorized by law. The work of 
raising the grade of the territory was begun by 
the contractor about the 1st of July, and prosecut- 
ed with great energy up to the date of its com- 
pletion, the 10th of December. 

The total number of cubic yards of gravel de- 
posited on the district during that time amouuted 
to 170,344, namely: On private estates, 88,210; on 
streets, etc., below grade 12, 21,923; on streets 
above grade 12, 60,211. The expenses chargeable 
upon the owners of estates are— for 88,210 cubic 
yards' filling, at eiglity cents, $70,568; for raising 
buildings, etc., $3503.14; total, $74,071.14. The 
net cost to the city of the improvement will 
amount to about $176,651.52, namely, 21,923 yards' 
filling in streets, etc., at eighty cents, $17,538.40; 
60.211 yards' filling in streets, etc., at 92% cents, 
$55,695.17; estimated cost of street improvements, 
$92,417.95; expenses of surveying, engineering, 
superintendence, lighting, guarding, etc., say 
$11,000; total, $176,651.52. The appropriations 
heretofore made for the work amount to $205,000. 

The actual payments to date have been as fol- 
lows: Gravel, $141,857.20; surveying, $2455.05; en- 
gineering and expenses, $1686.10; superintendent, 
$1170; watchmen, $1920; gatemen, $444; raising 
buildings, $2934.50; carpenters' and masons' work, 
$1381.65; rent of office, fuel, lanterns, oil, etc., 
$251.45; advertising, printing and stationery, 
$206.51; teaming, $15.25; committee's expenses 
[1874]— refreshments, $544.80; carriage hire, $66; 
extension of East Lenox street, $19,614; laying out 
and widening Hunneman si i eet, $1609.50 ; ' unpaid 
draft for street damages, $10,228 \ total, $186,384.01 ; 
balance ot appropriation remaining on hand, $18,- 
615.99. 

To settle street damages there will be required, 
say, $62,000; balance due the contractor for filling, 
$1000; expenses of superintendence, collection, 
etc., $1000; total estimated amount to be paid, 
$64,000; deduct balance of appropriation on hand, 
$18,615; leaving amount to be provided, $45,385. 

It will be observed that the appropriations al- 
ready made are more than sufficient to cover the 
net. cost to the city of the improvement ; but it is 
necessary for the City Council to provide the 
means to cover the gross cost. 

The committee report the following: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Finance be re- 
quested to report an order providing the means 
for completing the improvement oh the North- 
ampton-street district. 

There was also appended to the report orders 
levying assessments for raising the grades of es- 
tates. 

The report was accepted, and the order assess- 
ing betteiments was postponed till Thursday next 
at 4 P. M.,to which time the Board voted to ad- 
journ. The order for the Committee on Finance 



FEBRUARY 15, 1875 



62 



to provide the means was read twice, passed and 
sent down. 

THIBD ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

Alderman Harris, for the Committee on Assess- 
ors' Department, submitted a. report nominating 
the following-named persons for Second Assistnnt 
Assessors : 

Ward 1— John Hartnett, Isaiah Whitte.n. 

"Ward 2— James E. Toner, William M. Starrett. 

Ward 3— M. F. Wells. 

Ward 4— Martin Dowling, W. S. Whitney. 

Ward 5— Roger H. Srannell, John J. Murphy. 

Ward 6- John T. Piince. 

Ward 7— Jeremiah Sullivan, Dennis Moore. 

Ward 8— Ira D. Davenport. 

Ward 9 Francis R. Stoddard, Frederick A. Wil- 
kins. 

Ward 10— F. S. Risteen. 

Ward 11— William B. Smart. 

Ward 12— Thomas Leavitt, John E. Huntress. 

Ward 13 -Edward W. Dolan. 

Ward 14— Elbridge G. Scott, William H. Mcln- 
tosb. 

Ward 15— Edward Kellv, John C. Coombs. 

Ward 16— George W. Conant, E. H. R. Ruggles, 
Richardson Hutchinson. 

Ward 17— George H. Williams, Edward M. Skin- 
ner. 

Ward 19— Richard B. Smart. 

Ward 20— Dennis G. Quirk. 

Ward 21— Isaac W. Derby. 

Ward 22— D. D. Taylor. 

Report accepted and nominations laid over. 

STREET DAMAGES. 

Alderman Harris, for the Committee on Streets 
on the part of the Board, submitted an order to 
nay F. B. & J. M. Austin $15,552.50, for land taken 
in name of F. B. Austin in widening Pleasant 
street, Charleston n. Order read once. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Bigelow, for the Committee on Li- 
censes, submitted reports as follows : 

Victuallers' Licenses Granted — D. Hamilton, 30 
Phillips street; Elijah W. Jaquith, 5G East Canton 
street ; Dana & Flanders, 34 Crescent place ; Lynch 
& Mahoney, 292 North street ; G. D. Clough, 21 
Cambridge street; Rounds & Vaughn, 61 Green 
street. 

Inuholder's License Granted— John D. Miller, 
1001 and 1003 Washington street. 

Victuallers' Licenses Refused— Philip Marzyn- 
ski, 104 Ebot street; M. H. Murray, 15 Vernon 
street, Boston Highlands. 

Innholder's License Refused— A. M. Ross, 16 
Kneel^nd street. 

Minors' Applications Granted— Fourteen news- 
boys. 

Dealer in Second-hand Articles Licensed — 
Lewis Levi, 23-25 Salem street. 

Pawnbroker Licensed— Lewis Levi, 23-25 Salem 
street. 

Billiard Licenses Granted — Charles H. Picker- 
ing, 67 Causeway street; W. H. Leavitt, 580 Wash- 
ington street. 

Auctioneer Licensed— Thomas M. Smith, Jr., 97 
State street. 
, Amusement Licenses Granted— James Fitzger- 
ald, to give a variety entertainment at Federhen 
Hall; Miss C. C. Johnstone, for license for dra- 
matic readings at Centre Hall, Ward 17. 

Severally accepted. 

PERMIT TO BUILD. 

Alderman Pope, for the Joint Committee on 
Survey and Inspection of Buildings, submitted a 
report with order authorizing a permit to Glover 
& Jones to erect wooden building on a wharf in 
rear of Commercial streeet, Ward 16. Order read 
once. 

PERMITS FOR STABLES. 

Alderman Worthington, for the Committee on 
Health on the part of the Board, submitted re- 
ports in favor of granting permits to occupy sta- 
bles, on the usual conditions, as follows: M. C. 
Murry, Downer street, Ward 15, the stable to 
conform to grade as established bv the city of 
Boston ; Thomas T. Lane, Paris street, near Marion 
street, provided the old stable shall be removed 
and the new one placed nearer to the right of line 
than at present; James N. Cowin, Princeton 
street, No. 19, Ward 1, provided all outbuildings 
(vault, shed, etc.,) shall be lemoved. Severally ac- 
cepted. 

PAVING REPORTS AND ORDERS. 

Alderman Power, for the Committee on Paving, 
submitted reports and orders as follows : 



Report recommending leave to withdraw on pe- 
tition of Cressy& Noyes, for leave to locate a pipe 
for water sprinkler at 49-51 W^ieham street. 

Report that leave be granted on the usual con- 
ditions to S. & D. Richards to move two wooden 
buildings from Garden court to Foss street, 
Charlestown. 

Report that no action is necessary on petition of 
Eaton, Sawyer, et at., for removal of ice from 
Chatham street, the work having been done. 

Severally accepted. 

Ordered, That the Board establish the revised 
grade of Bower street, bet-ween Walnut avenue 
and Warren street, as shown on a plan and profile 
drawn by the City Surveyor, dated Nov. 18, 1874; 
also the revised grade of Sherman street, near 
Bower street, as shown on a plan and profile 
drawn Dy the City Surveyor, dated Jai. 23,1871; 
said plans being deposited in the office of the City 
Surveyor. 

Read twice and passed. 

Report and orders for the collection of sidewalk 
assessments in Greenville street, and edgestone 
assessments in Canal street. Orders read twice 
and passed. 

Ordered, That the sum of $3.48 be abated from 
the sir] e walk assessment of Hannah S. and N. G. 
W. Dewetson, No. 122 Silver street; that the sum 
of $33.17, assessed to Seth C. Ames for edgestones 
on Brooks street, be abated, and the same assessed 
to D. waiter Blaney; that the sum of $40.50, as- 
sessed on heirs of C. & G. Beldeu for edgestones 
oa Brooks street, be abated , and the same assessed 
on William Wood ; that the sum of $2 70 be abated 
from the sidewalk assessment of Frederick Mun- 
roe, on Russell street, the same being an error in ' 
assessment; that the sum of $18.39, assessed to E. 
P. Brown for edgestone; - . on School street. Ward 
17, be abated, and the same assessed to A. N. Bur- 
ton. 

Read twice and passed. 

PERMITS FOR STEAM ENGINES. 

Alderman Power, for the Committee on Steam 
Engines, submitted reports in favor of granting 
permits to locate steam engioes by heirs of Solo- 
mon Wildes on Washington street, and Fiftv As- 
sociates on Washington street, near Elm street. 
Severally accepted. 

MUNICIPAL REGISTER FOE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Alderman Power, for the Joint Committee on 
Printing, to whom was referred the request of 
School Committtee for a cony of the Municipal 
Register for each member, reported that the re- 
quest ought to be granted, and as the city ordi- 
nances place the editions and distribution of the 
city publications under the control of the Com- 
mittee on Printing they will direct the supply to 
the School Committee, when printed, renderingno 
fm ther action necessary on the part of the City 
Council. Accepted and sent dowr. 

EMPLOYFS IN LAMP DEPARTMENT. 

Alderman Stebbins, for the Committee on 
Lamps, submitted the following: 

Ordered, That on and after March 15, until other- 
wise ordered, the rate of compensation of per- 
sons employed in the lighting and care of the 
public lamps in the city proper, East and South 
' Boston shall be at the rate of two cents per 
lamp per night. 

Alderman Stebbins Sfid this was a reduction of 
a quarter of a cent. 

The order was read once. 

POLICE RULES AND REGULATIONS. 

The chairman, for the Committee on Police, 
submitted the following: 

Ordered, That section 50 of the rules and regu- 
lations for the government of the Boston Police 
Department shall not be construed to require the 
presence of day and night officers at the same 
time at roll call in tne several station bouses. 

Ordered. That the twenty-fifth section of the 
rules and regulations for the government of the 
Police Department be so amended that persons 
.over thirty- five years of age shall not be eligible 
for appointment. 

Severally read once. 

PUBLIC PARKS. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins, the Board took 
up the special assignment for five o'clock P. M., 
viz., order for the Mayor to petition the General 
Court for authority "to purchase or otherwise 
take land within the limits of the city" for pur- 
pose of public parks. The question was on the 
passage of the order. 



63 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



Alderman Power— I supposed when thi° order 
was laid on the table that it was because "his Gov- 
ernment was not prepared to go any furtiier, or 
commit this city, at the present time, to anything 
likely to call for such an immense amount of 
money, or so greatly increase the debt, as would 
the procuring of lands for a public park, and I 
should like, before saying anything further, to 
hear the reasons of the gentleman for desiring the 
matter assigned for today. 

Alderman Stebbins— I made the motion to take 
the order from the table and specially assign it 
for today, that the subject might be considered 
and disposed of. If it is the desire of the City 
Council to make application to the Legislature at 
its piesent session, it will be necessary for the or- 
der to pass at the present time, otherwise it will 
be ruled out and defeated this year. I made the 
motion because I thought the subject should be 
decided, and not because I am an advocate of the 
expendituie for parks at this time. 

Alderman Power— I move that the order be in- 
definitely postponed. 

Alderman Worihington — I trust we shall not 
indefinitely postpone this subject. It is altogether 
•too important for the health of the inhabitants of 
Boston, and for it; future prosperity, to Le,in defi- 
nitely postponed. The experience of every city in 
this Union, without exception, I think — at least 
cities of the size of Boston — is that it is a very 
great advantage to have public parks and squares. 
Chicago, Net York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and 
numerous other cities have expended money for 
parks,and m several cases have received back 
more money than they paid out, so that it is dem- 
onstrated to be a money-making as well as health- 
promoting scheme. New York, as anyone can see 
by examining the reports, has spent some $13,- 
000,000, and the income fiom the ae.ioiu- 
ing territory mote than pays the interest 
on the expenditure. Baltimore has a very large 
number of <*cres devoted to parks and squares, 
the income Lorn which is very large indeed, and 
the advantage to the city is very great. If gentle- 
men will look at the report of the commissioners 
who were appointed la c t year, after this order 
was discussed in the City Council and in the pa- 
pers, and the wishes of the people fully expressed 
in its lavor, they will see the very ereat advan- 
tage gained by other cities in establishing parks ; 
they will also find the evidence of gentlemen well 
versed on the subject, and their testimony is 
strongly in its favor. I hardly know what portion 
of the report of the Park Commission to read; 
every word of it is important for this board to 
consider; there is not a word in the report that is 
not directly and strongly in favor of the city of 
Boston laying out parks and boulevards for the 
better health of the people. 

[The Alderman read a lengthy extract from the 
report of the Park Commission, beginning on 
page 7, relating to the sanitary improvements 
needed in the city, and then he resumed his re- 
marks.] 

I could read more. It is important for us to 
read and reflect upon this report. Sufficient 
reason is given there why we should have parks 
and squares, and why we should pass this order 
now. This order is merely for the Mayor to peti- 
tion the Legislature for authority to take 
or purchase lauds for a puDlic park. 
The argument made against it is that 
it is an entering wedge. Sir, that may 
be true, because it will give us authority; but the 
Mayor will have no authoiity to take land with- 
out the consent of this Board, and it will be no 
harm to obtain this authority from the Legisla- 
ture, so that in case the Government decides to 
have parks and a favorable opportunity is offered, 
the lands may be secured. Jsow we have no pos- 
sible way of doing that; we must remain as we 
are, for we have no authority. Therefore I think 
xe should request the Mayor to petition for this 
authority, and whether we immediately lay out 
parks or not. 

Alderman Qumcy— I have no desire, Mr. Chair- 
man, to unnecessarily augment by a penny the 
burdens which now weigh heavily on the tax- 
payer, but still I agree with his Honor the Mayor, 
that a wise foresight should induce us to take the 
step proposed at the present time. How often do 
we hear it said, that had our ancestors realized in 
the least what was to be the future of their city, 
they would have undertaken and carried out for 
our benefit, at a then trifling expense, the very 
improvement^ which are now costing us millions. 
They may have been excusable in failing to ap- 
preciate their city's future, but can we say as 



much for ourselves unless we wilfully shut out- 
eyes to indications which have already called 
forth the comments of our rivals? Look at 
the impetus which commerce must surely re- 
ceive by the opening of the tunnel route 
and consider the splendid terminal facilities of- 
fered by the oouth Boston flats in connection 
with the railway schemes ] rojected, and we must 
surely agree with the editorial opinion of the New 
York Times to the effect that Boston may easily 
attain the first rank as a commercial port and at- 
tain a preeminence which will result in immensely 
increa.- ing the export trade of the country. Be- 
lieving as I do in the high position which our city 
is destined to assume amo.ig the metropolises of 
the New World, I think we can hardly do better 
than to take the advice, though not exactly in the 
intended sense, offered us by Boston's poet many 
years ago in connection with a scheme of which 
we now see the accomplishment. Among the lat- 
ter-day warnings which he enumerates we read — 

"When the first locomotive's wheel 
Rolls through the Hoosac Tunnel's bore, 
Till then let Gumming blaze away , 

And Miller's saints blow up the globe ; 
But when you see that blessed day, 
Then order your ascension robe." 

We have now seen that blessed day, and though 
we may hardly anticipate the millennium, is it 
not a sign that Boston's ascension to a higher 
rank as a commercial metropolis than she has 
ever yet enjoyed is at hand, and in that view may 
we not consider the proposed park or system of 
parks as a robe or ornament both fitting and 
necessary for the rank and position which awaits 
Boston in the near future? If so, let us give our 
orders now, while land is cheap, and, as his Honor 
has suggested, pay for improvement thereon by 
degrees as we can afford it, trusting to tne better- 
ments to take care of the mterest on original pur- 
chase money. Then we may fairly, expect that 
our posterity will give us credit for having read 
and profited by the lessons of experience. 

In reply to the suggestion tb>.t this is going to 
entail a large expense, I would call attention to 
the subject of a new Court House. We have had 
authority|forja number of years to take lands for a 
Court House, but nothing has ever been done. I 
fail to see that harm can result by obtaining the 
desired authority from the Legislature. 

Alderman Power — It is all very fine to talk about 
the health of the city, and to show what other cit- 
ies have done. There is one thing which to me is 
the tno j t important in this world. It i<= honor and 
credit. And is there a city in this Union today 
whose honor and credit stand as high as the city 
of Boston's? And why is it so? It is because she 
has enjoyed a pruuent, economical and honest 
administration of her affairs, and she has always 
maintained her houor and credit, because 
those who have had the administration of 
the Government have been very careful 
to guaid the city from ever entering into 
such wild schemes as this appears to be. 
Now, sir, we all know there is not one single 
reason why other cities need or should have a 
park that applies to Boston, the whole suburbs of 
which form an elegant park, which will compare 
favorably with those in any city in this country .- 
I do not mean to deny the sanitary advantages of 

Earks; but I object to all these arguments, 
ecause they lead people to believe 
that Boston is the most unhealthy place in 
the country — the reason given for which is 
that we nave no parks. Now, sir, all 
who take the trouble to search into the matter, 
know that Boston is not the most unhealthy, but 
one of the most healthy cities in the country ; and 
these figures in the report of the Park Commis- 
sion, showing that the death rate is increasing 
every year, are calculated to lead people 
astray. I have seen statistics within a few 
days showiBg that since the addition of 
West Roxbuiy and Charle'stown the death 
rate is less than it was before. The year when the 
smallpox prevailed is put down here as a 
scare, and to show that Boston is growing un- 
healthy. I do not deny the sanitary advantages 
of public parks; I have no objections to the city 
laying them out when we can afford to do so. But 
it is of more advantage for Boston to promote its 
business interests, to give an impetus to its man- 
ufactures, and to extend such encouragement to 
capitalists that they will stay here and do busi- 
ness. Now. what is the greatest curse that 
ever befell any community or country? It is a 
high rate of taxation, and I say the city of Boston 
is not competent to stand a more exorbitant rate 



FEBRUARY 15 



1875 



64 



of taxation than it is burdened with now, and un- 
less we do something to less3n taxation we shall 
lose many more of our business men. 1 have been 
at work on two or three committees today, mak- 
ing up the estimates for the coming year; 
in company with the Superintendent of Streets 
I have looked over many petitions for public 
improvements, for grading and paving streets, 
and 1 have not seen one that ought not to be done 
today. But still I have had to tell him to throw 
aside more than one-half of them in order to cut 
down the appropriation. The Committee on Pav- 
ing ought to have two millions of dollars this year ; 
we had thirteen hundred thousand dollars last year, 
and have been looking about to see how we could 
cut it down, and do something to reduce the rate 
of taxation in the city of Boston. This has been 
the case with the other committees I have met to- 
day, and the same applies to every department in 
the city today They must pass by some im- 
provements which seem necessary to carry 
on the business of the city and put the citi- 
zens in a safe condition. They must let many 
improvements lie over fo' - another «year, to 
see if we cannot reduce taxation. A great deal 
of stress is laid by the Park Commissioners 
on the low lands of ' Boston; that a great 
deal of the high death rate and prevailing disease 
comes from them, and the only way to save the 
city is to fill them up and have a park. Now, sir, 
I differ from those doctors and the Board of 
Health. I say, without fear of contradiction, that 
you cannot prevent the greater portion.of this in- 
creased death rate — if it is caused by a want of 
proper drainage, as they say— by laying out a pub- 
lic park there. If improper drainage has any- 
thing to do with it, the cause is in the 
improper manner in which the best houses 
in Boston are connected with sewers. This it is 
that Alls the best houses on the Back Bay with im- 
pure air, and a very small part of the trouble is 
caused by the emptying of the sewers into the 
water. I say this without fear of contradiction 
from any physician, and if gentlemen will look 
into it they will find the same thing. The 
gentleman talks about our ancestors, and 
what they might have done if they had 
looked ahead. I say, when they laid out a part of 
Washington street a hundred feet iu width, and 
built the Milldam, that is evidence that they did 
look ahead, and went as fast as their means and 
the demands of the times would warrant them. 
The taxpayers of today do not want us to go one 
step farther iu chis matter of parks. I 
should be glad if the city of Boston could afford 
to have them ; but she cannot. They cannot be 
laid out without the city assuming a large debt, 
and I say you should not add one dollar to the 
present debt of the city of Boston, if you do not 
want to drive our best taxpayers out of the 
city. As I said before, I have spent this day in 
trying to see how many matters we could retrench 
in., aud I contend that this is one of the improve- 
ments that should be postponed for the present. 
When Boston can afford to have a public park, I 
shall be as proud of it as any gentleman in this 
Board; but I do not want to see any steps taken 
today that will commit the city to this expensive 
improvement. I therefore move that the o; der be 
indefinitely postponed. 

Alderman Power in the chair. 

Aldeiman Clark — Mr. Chairman, I do not pro- 
pose at this time to argue either in favor or 
against a public park for the city of Boston. 1" be- 
lieve that the sentiment of the people is too well 
understood upon this subject to require any argu- 
ment in favor of such a measure whenever the 
financial condition of the city will admit of ic, and 
that this condition will soon return to us is sure if 
we impiove our advantages and make this, 
as we may, the most important commercial 
depot upon the Atlantic coast, both for 
the exportation of merchandise to foreign 
countries and its importation and distribution 
throughout the length and breadth of the coun- 
try. No city has such natural advantages, and 
nowhere cari business be done so expeditiously or 
so economically as here. All that wa need is for 
our capitalists to interest themselves in helping 
for warn increased railroad and terminal facilities. 
Such an investment of capital is demanded 
by an already increased business and is 
sure to return handsome dividends and keep 
occupied the splendid warehouses which have 
been erected. Our moneyed men should invest 
here instead of building railroads and cities in 
other sections of the country and by their neglect 
injuring the one in which their capital has been 



accumulated. For, sir, there is hardly a raihoad 
iu the West or South that has not been built by 
the aid of Boston capital, and without the energy 
and capital of this city the Pacific Railroad 
would still be among the things talked of, but not 
accomplished; and today Boston capital is seeking 
investment in unsuccessful ArUansas and Texas 
railroads, and leaving one of the most promising 
lines to the West, having its terminus in the very 
heart of our city, unfinished for the lack of funds 
so freely invested in distant mterprises. If the 
capitalists ot Boston, instead of investing funds 
in distant enterprises, will look a little to the in- 
terests of one which leads directly into the heart 
of our city, business will at once improve, and 
this cry of high taxation and hard times will cease. 
The necessity, however, of improved drainage for 
a large and rapidly growing section of our city is 
a fact which cannot be ignored and which claims 
an early, earnest and most careful consideration. 
Recent developments in regard to the large in- 
crease in the death rats make it imperative that 
this most vital of all our conditions, the health 
ot our people, should receive without delay 
the consideiation ot this body, and that 
every means should be used which may seem to 
be necessary for the accomplishment of this end. 
We are placed here, Mr. Chairman, as the guard- 
ians of the healch and lives of the people, the 
poor as vvell as the rich, and we shall prove un- 
faithful to our trust if we longer pass unheeded 
the admonitions which we have received from so 
many sources and from our own knowledge of the 
facts. 

I believe, sir, that the health of the entire south- 
ern Back Bay section of our city is seriously 
affe 'ted at the present time, and will continue to 
be more and more endangered in the future by 
the poisonous influences which come from an im- 
perfect and inadequate system of drainage. The 
great sewer which drains a large section of the 
Highlands and which takes the sewage of 
all the principal breweries terminates on 
the west side of Parker street, and spteads 
its filth over hundreds of acres of flats, 
and the air which should prove such a blessing 
during the heats of summer, is filled with the 
poisonous stench, and is carried into every sec- 
tion of the city, the promoter of sickness and 
death instead of health and its attendant bless- 
ings. Mr. Chairman, I desire to call the attention 
of the Boaru to the communication from the Board 
of health to the City Council ot 1874, dated Dec. 
17, and with your permission for the purpose of 
enforcing my statements I will read from this re- 
port. 

[The Alderman read at length from City Docu- 
ment 112 of 1874, being a communication from the 
Board of Health upon the necessity of improved 
sewerage in the Roxbury Canal, Stony Brook and 
Muddy Brook, and resumed. 1 

Mr. Chairman— I am informed by competent en- 
gineering authority that the be.-t and almost the 
only way to improve the drainage of this section 
is to adopt some system which will carry the 
sewage beyond the flats out into the bay, where 
the channel is sufficiently deep to prevent its re- 
turn. Unfortunately the grade of the land is un- 
favorable for the construction of such a se ft er. It 
is too flat, and without the aid of tide water 
the end sought for could not be accomplished; 
but by the construction of a water basin in wiiich 
the water could be raised or lowered at pleasure 
with each returning tide a sufficient quantity 
could be forced through th° sewers and thus make 
the system as complete and perfect as that of 
Pans, which I understand to be the best of 
any city in the world. It is not proposed, 
as some writer has either ignorautly or ma- 
liciously stated, to make this basin a recepti- 
cle of sewage matter — it is that already — 
but to reclaim it from what it now is and fill it 
with pure water which may be used by the action 
of the tide in cleansing the sewers from impuri- 
ties twice during twenty-four hours. Now, Mr. 
Chairman, in order to be able to carry out this 
method, if this is found to be the best,'it will te 
absolutely necessary to have the right from the 
Legislature to take or purchase lands for this pur 
pose. The right, 1 say, to take; because it would 
perhaps be impossible to buy them at a fair price 
if it wj.s found that we must have them; 
and if we desire to obtain this right we must ask 
for it ; and, therefore, Mr. Chairman, I contend that 
we by our votes today should authorize the Mayor 
to obtain or try to obtain from the Legislature 
the authority necessary to control the so-called 
full basin and properly sewer and drain this section 



65 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



of the city, which cannot be properly drained witu- 
out it. The whole of the property necessary for this 
enterprise is in danger ot being lost to us by being 
filled up and built upon. For the same enterprise 
which has filled the flats on this side of the basin 
and created such a large amounr of taxable prop- 
erty for the city, will ultimately extend beyond to 
the Highlands of Brookline. I do not, Mr. Chair- 
man, wish to be considered as unnecessarily 
alarmed in regard to this subject, or as imagining 
evils where none exist; but I have tor the past 
three years given it much thought, aDd cannot 
but come to the conclusion that it is 
vital to the health of the people and the 
future growth and prisperity of the city: 
and believing as I do that with a pioper sjstem or 
drainage ours would be one of the healthiest cities 
in the world in proportion to population, I shall 
feel it my duty to advocate at all times such 
measures as will tend to accomplish that end. 
Mr. Chairman, I am somewhat of the opinion 
of the Alderman from the Twelfth Ward, 
who, while assenting in general to the re- 
port <f the Park Commissioners, of which 
he was a member, was not quite ready in view of 
the heavy debt upon us and the dulness of busi- 
ness to incur any unnecessary expense at present. 
I quite agree with him and with those who in- 
dorse his caution, and I trust that no expenditure 
of money will be made for any purpose whatever 
which is not clearly for tne interest of 
our whole people. In authorizing the Mayor 
to petition the Legislature, as the order 
provides, we make no expenditure of money, nor 
does it involve the expenditure of a single dollar. 
It may be uiged that there is danger in possessing 
this right, lest it be used before the proper time 
arrives; that it would be unsafe for this Board to 
possess this right lest they abuse it. Is it possible, 
Mr. Chairman, that the men who occupy these 
seats cannot be safely trusted with such authori- 
ty? Is it unsafe, genttemen, to entrust you w'th 
power from the State to protect the health and Jives 
of the citizens of Boston. Mr. Chairman, I for one 
have too much confidence in the integrity and 
honor of this Board to believe that they cannot 
be trusted with this or any right which the Legis- 
lature may choose to grant the city for thi^ pur- 
pose or any purpose whatsoever; if such is not 
the case, we are unwoithy the seats we occupy. 
Not a dollar chu be spent," if this right is obtained, 
in the laying out of parks or in building of sewers 
until you decide that the interest of the city 
requires it and approve "f it by your votes. Gen- 
tlemen, I believe, with His Honor, that the matter 
would be safe in your hands. Mr. Chairman, £ 
have endeavored to show that a necessity exists 
for immediate action by the City CouuciTfor im- 
proved sewerage facilities, and in order to carry 
out this improvement to the best advantage, it 
will doubtless be necessary to obtain legislative 
authority. I have been led to a belief in this neces- 
sity from«the reports of the boards of health, both 
city and State, from the opinions of some of our 
most eminent physicians who have made the sub- 
ject of the sanitary condition of the city a study, 
and from my own senses of sight and smeJl. If 
the right is obtained and it should be found 
that the best method for an ample and 
perfect system of drainage would involve 
the taking of a portion of the flats be- 
yond Parker street for a reservoir of puie wa- 
ter for purposes which I have already mentioned, 
the whole territory in the immediate neighbor- 
hood will be so much improved that the increased 



income from taxes would soon pay the interest on 
the whole outlay. Mr. Chairman, nature has 
done much to make this one of the most healthy 
and beautiful cities of America. She has given 
us a magnificent harbor ; a beautiful river border- 
ing one of our principle diiveways, which will 
afford an abunclant supply for a lake of pure 
water, in what will torn be our very centre^ from 
which we may derive the combined benefits of 
health and pleasure for the masses of our people, 
and if we improve these opportunities which so 
abundantly sarround us, we shall accomplish that 
for our city which will entitle us to the gratitude 
of the present and the blessings of the future. 

These, Mr. Chairman, are my views in regard to 
this very important matter. I do not believe any 
subject has come befoie this Government in years 
past, or will come before it the present year, that 
is half as important as this, which looks to the 
better drainage of the city of Boston. I hope the 
Aldei man from Ward 12, when he was looking 
over the estimates, did not attempt to cut down 
the appropriation for the better drainage 
of the city. I believe it is of infinitely more impor- 
tance than the appropriation for paving, and that 
the expenditure for drainage and sewerage should 
be incieased rather than curtailed. Let every 
other appropriation be curtailed rather than that 
for good d lain age. It is a fact which cannot be 
winked out of sight that the city of Boston, which 
ought to be the most healthy, is one of the most 
unhealthy cities of the United States. 

Alderman Harris — Will the gentleman give his 
authority? 

Alderman Clark— My authority comes from the 
city and State boards of health and the most 
competent physicians. There is no more compe- 
tent physician than the gentleman who wrote the 
report of the Park Commission, and if the gentle- 
man from the Charlestown District hos read that 
report he will have no occasion to ask my author- 
ity for that statement. It is a fact that business 
has been dull and unsatisfactory for some 
months; but that is no sign that it is always 
going to remain so,. The time will come when 
the people of Boston will ask for and have a park, 
but I am not in favor of spending money for a 
park now; all I ask for is that the Mayor shall 
have authority to ask the Legislature for power to 
take lands to promote the proper drainage of the 
city. AVe are not obliged to use it if we do not see 
fit. The city of Boston need not be afraid of ob- 
taining too many fights from the State of Massa- 
chusetts ; there is no danger of that. The remark 
that to have this power would be dangerous, I 
consider to be a reflection upon this Board that 
we do not deserve. I think, perhaps, that the or- 
der needs an amendment, and I offer the follow- 
ing: 

"San? act not to take effect unless accepted by 
a majority of the legal voters present and voting 
thereon at meetings duly called for that purpose 
in the several wards." 

That, Mr. Chairman, leaves the whole matter in 
the hands of the people ; and if we obtain this 
right, it is for the people to say whether they will 
have parks or not, and whether they will have 
proper drainage for the protection of the lives of 
their families. 

On motion of Alderman Harris, further consid- 
eration of the subject was postponed till Thurs- 
day next at 4% o'clock P. M. 

On motion of Alderman Prescott, the Board ad- 
journed, and stood adjourned to Thursday next at 
4 P.M. 



66 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY 18, 1875. 



Adjourned regular meeting at four o'clock, P. 
M., Alderman Clark, Chairman, presiding. 

EXECUTIVE NOMINATIONS CONFIRMED. 

Superintendent of Pawnbrokers— William H. 
McCausland, vice Ebenezer Sliute, resigned. 

Superintendent of Intelligence Offices— Henry 
C. Hemmenway, vice Harrison O. Read, resigned. 

Constable— Charles S. Tasker, for duty at East 
Boston Municpal Court, vice William H. McCaus- 
land promoted. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Board. Nic tolas Corcoran, for leave to occupy a 
wooden stable for one horse on Linden street. 

To the Committee on County Accounts. Consta- 
bles of the South Boston Municipal Court, for in- 
crease of compensation. 

To the Joint Committee on Ordinances. John 
H. Wright et al.. that the driving of cattle in the 
public streets may be regulated or restrained. 

To the Committee on Paving. Michael McDon- 
ald, that the grade of Starr street, Ward 17, be 
established. 

Valentine Homer, for leave to place a lantern in 
front of his stoie on Washington street, at Rox- 
bury. 

SECOND ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

On motion of Alderman Harris, the Board pro- 
ceeded to an election for second assistant asses- 
sors. Aldermen Harris and Pope were appointed 
a committee to collect and count votes. They re- 
ported as follows • 

Whole number of votes cast 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Ward 1. (2 Districts.) 

John Hartnett . 8 

Isaiah Whitten 12 

George Shackf ord 9 

Ward 2. (.2 Districts.) 

James E. Toner 9 

William N . Starrett 11 

C. F. McDevitt 4 , 

Ward 3. (1 District.) 

M.F.Wells 4 

A.K. Holden 5 

Joseph Allen 3 

Ward 4. (2 Districts.) 

Martin Dowling 12 

W. S. Whitney 12 

Ward 5. (2 Districts.) 

Roger H. Scannell 9 

John J. Murphy 11 

P.J. Hastings 3 

B. Uallender 1 

Ward 6. (1 District.) 
John T. PriDce 12 

Ward 7. (2 Districts.) 

Jeremiah Sullivan 6 

Dennis Moore 8 

Dudley Pray 10 

Ward 8. (1 District.) 
Ira D. Davenport 12 

Ward 9. (2 Districts.) 

Francis R. Stoddard 12 

Frederick A. Wilkins 12 

Ward 10. (1 District.) 
F. S. Risteen 12 

Ward 11. a District.) 

William B. Smart 10 

S. S. Cudworth 2 

Ward 12. (2 Districts.) 

Thomas Leavitt '. 12 

John E. Huntress 8 

William Gallagher 4 

Ward 13. (1 District.) 
Edward W. Dolan 12 

Ward 14. (2 Districts.) 

Elbi idge G. Scott 12 

William H. Mcintosh 12 

Ward 15. (2 Districts.) 

Edward Kelley 7 

John 0. Coombs 8 

John W. Steere 7 

I. F. Atwood 2 

Ward 16. (3 Districts.) 

George W. Conant ' 12 

E. H. R. Ruggles 12 

Richardson Hutchinson 12 



Ward 17. (2 Districts.) 

George H. Williams 11 

Edward M. Skinner 9 

Alden Bartlett 4 

Ward 19. (1 District.) 

Richard B. Smart 9 

J. F. Taylor 3 

Ward 20. (1 District.) 
Dennis G. Quirk 12 

Ward 21. (1 District.) 

Isaac W. Derby 9 

Henry Dana 2 

Isaac W. Taylor 1 

Ward 22. (1 District.) 
D.D. Taylor 12 

And Messrs. Whitten, Shackford, Toner, Star 
rett, Dowling, Whitney, Scannell, Murphy, Prince. 
Moore, Pray, Davenport, Stoddard, Wiluins, Ris- 
teen, William B. Smart, Eeavitt, Huntress, Dolan, 
Scott, Mcintosh, Coombs, Conant, Ruggles, Rich- 
ardson, Williams, Skinner, Richard B. Smart, 
Quirk, Derby and Taylor were elected. 
Second. Ballot, {to fill vacancy in Ward Three.) 

Michael F. Wells 1 

Joseph Allen 3 

A. R. Holden u 

And there was no choice. 

Third Ballot, (do.) 

Michael F. Wells 4 

A. R. Holden 6 

Joseph Allen 1 2 

And there was no choice. 

Fourth Ballot, (do.) 

A. R. Holden 6 

Michael F. Wells 4 

Joseph Allen 2 

And there was no choice. 

Fifth Ballot (do). 

A. R. Holden 7 

M. F. Wells 3 

Joseph Allen 2 

And Mr. Holden was declared elected. 

Sixth Ballot (to fill vacancy in Ward Fifteen). 

Edward Kelly 3 

J . V. Atwood 1 

John W. Steere 8 

And Mr. Steere was declared elected. 
Certificate sent down. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

O :der to allow Glover & Jones to erect a wooden 
building on a wharf in rear of Commercial street, 
Ward 16. Passed and sent down. 

Order to pay F. B. and J. M. Austin $15,542.50, 
for land damages on Pleasant street, Cnarles- 
town. Passed. 

Order for Assessors to verify, if the committee 
deem it expedient, the Treasurer's manuscript for 
collection of taxes. Passed and sent down. 

Order for an amendment of section 50 of the 
Police Rules, so that day and night officers shall 
not be present at the same time at roll call in the 
station houses. Passed. 

Order to amend the Police Rules so that thirty- 
five years shall be the maximum age at time of 
appointment of members of the department. 

Alderman Power — I object to any such change 
as that. Unless the present generation has sadly 
degenerated, it reems to me there is no necessity 
for the adoption of any such rule. It used to be, 
when I was growing up, that a man was in his 
prime, at forty, and I have not seen anything to 
warrant me in believing that it is not so now, if a 
man lives as he should. Any man who is fit to be 
appointed a policeman should he of good habits, 
and live prudently and temperately, and if he has 
done that he must be in the prime of life at forty 
years of age. I have seen offices which are much 
more important and call for more talent, as well 
as mental and bodily strength, thanja policeman's 
does, filled by persons who it was thought were 
not too old at sixty to be appointed, it seems to 
me that this proposed amendment to the rules 
should not be made. If a man is qualified in 
everyway to be a policeman, being over thirty- 
five years old should not preclude his appointmeut 
to the office, and I hope that provision will not 
be put in the rules. 

Alderman Stebbins — I was hoping that some 
member of the Police Committee would respond 
to the gentleman from Ward 12, but as they do 
not I will say that the order is a step in the right 
direction. I will admit that a man is in the prime 
of life at forty years ; but after that time he is on 
the descending' rathei than the ascending route. 
I think that to secure the services of good men on 
the force we should not exceed the limit made by 



FEBRUARY 18, 1875. 



67 



this order. We all know the peculiar duties the 
police have to perform, requiring not only the 
strength of a young man, but very hard labor, 
which an old man is not able to give to the service 
of the city. I hope the order will be sustained, 
for it seems to me to be a step in the right direc- 
tion. 

Aldeitnao Bui-rage — The Alderman from Ward 
8 has correctly stated the motives which influ- 
enced the committee in lecommencling the pas- 
sage of the order. Undoubtedly, men will grow 
old in the service, and it is not the policy of the 
city, I understand, to discharge faithful servants 
on account of age, unless evidence requires it, and 
it was thought best for tnem to begin at a young- 
er age than forty. 

Alderman Harris moved to lay the order on the 
table. Lost, by arising vote — 5 for, 6 against. 

Alderman Power— It seems to me that, although 
physical force ana ability are of course absolutely 
necessary in a policeman, his mental qualifica- 
tions are even of more importance than those. I 
may be in error; may have had better judgment; 
been more prudent and better fitted for the duties 
of a policeman when I was twenty-one than I am 
now, but I do not think so. It does not seem to 
me that any man can at such an early age possess 
the judgment which is necessary in a policeman. 
In fact, I do not know of any public servant who 
requires better judgment than a policeman should 
have. While I agree that as persons grow older, 
there may be an age beyond which appointments 
should not go. I think that as it stands now — I 
understand that forty has been the limit — if the 
rule is strictly adheied to, it will be proper in all 
resptcts, and that gentlemen should hesitate be- 
fore passing an order of this kind. It is a pretty 
seiious matter, and I think it would be best to lay 
it on the table till it has been considered some- 
what more than it has been. 

Alderman Bigelow— It is well known that a very 
large proportion of our policemen are between 
fifty and sixty years of age, and it seems to me 
that in making appointments we should secure 
their services prospectively for ten or fifteen 
years, which will be the case if we wisely adopt 
this order providing for their appointment at 
thirty-five or under. I certainly hope the order 
will pass. 

Alderman Stebbins— The Alderman who last 
spoke has anticipated the remark I was about to 
make— that the city has too many policemen who 
have passed tbe prime of life. It is true that the 
great difficulty, the great drawback in the depart- 
ment is that we have too many old men connected 
with it. It does not seem proper that these old men 
should be discharged, but there do not seem 
to be sufficient places, wheie the duties are light, 
to provide for these men. It is well known to 
members of this board that io. New York and Lon- 
don the limit of appointments is at thirty-five 
years of age. 

Alderman O'Brien— What I object to more par- 
ticularly in this order is that it proscribes all men 
over thirty-five years of age. 1 am satisfied that 
there are thousands of active, able-bodied men 
ranging from thirty five to forty years of age Who 
could serve the city faithfully in that department. 
After a man reaches thirty-five or forty years his 
condition oupht to be considered; sonie men are 
as young at fifty as others are at thirty-five, and 
are as able to do duty. I object to this order be- 
cause of its proscription of all men over thirty- 
five years old, which it would be injustice to do. 

Alderman Power — One thing the Committee on 
Police cannot deny : let them look back to those 
who were appointed at the age of forty, and I 
think they will find that if those men weie tem- 
perate and prudent then, they are so today. They 
have not turned one off for drunkenness, but I 
can find many discharged for that cause who were 
appointed at thirty-five years or j ounger. That is 
my experience since 1 have had a seat at this 
Board. Men appointed at forty have not 
given way to temptation, while it is of 
frequent occurrence that some of these young- 
er men have given way to temptation 
and his honor the Mayor has had to discharge 
them. I think it will prove a bad rule. As the 
gentleman who has just taken his seat remarked, 
it proscribes all men older than thirty-five. Of 
course there are many men over thirty-five 
who are better fitted for the service than 
many who are under thirty-five. There is 
no necessity for such a rule. If tbe Mayor and 
the Committee on Police do their duty they will 
not take a man who is not fit for the position, 
whether over thirty-five or under. It is entirely 



in your hands now to appoint these officers, and 
you are responsible for it. It seems to me that 
such a rule is entirely unnecessary. 

Aldermen Quincy — If the evil exists — as I have 
no doubt it does — that th°re are too many old men 
on the active list of the police force, we ate 
taking hold of the wrong end, and it seems to me 
that we should consider where a policeman's term 
of service should end, rather than where it should 
begin. There are no doubt many cases where old 
policemen canuot be actively employed, but the 
public welfare must be paramount, and we should 
fix some limit beyond which their term ot service 
should not extend, instead of fixing the limit 
where they should begin. It seems to me ihat a 
man of thirty-six years should not be proscribed 
because there is no position in which he can be 
placed when he grows too old for active service. I 
cannot vote for the order in its present form, but 
I would like to remeriy the evil in regard to plac- 
ing old men in the service. 

Alderman Power called for tne yeas and nays 
and the order was lost yeas 6, nays 6 : 

Yeas — Aldermen Bigelow, Burrage, Clark, Pope, 
Stebbins, Worthi neton— 6. 

Nays — Aldermen Harris, O'Brien, Power, Ptes- 
cott, Quincy, Viles — 6. 

Order to pay the lamplighteis in Boston, East 
Boston and South Boston, on and after March 
15th next, two cents per lamp per night. Passed. 

Preamble ana order levying assessments for 
betternienrs on abutters on Northampton-street 
district. [Pages 9 to 19 of City Doc. No. 25.] 
Order passed and sent down. 

LEXINGTON AND CONCORD CENTENNIAL. 

The following was received and read : 

To the Honorable the City Council: Gentlemen — 
I have the honor of transmitting herewith the en- 
closed communications from the inhabitants of 
the towns of Concord and Lexington, inviting 
representations of the City Council of Boston to 
be present at the celebrations in those towns of 
the centennial anniversary of the opening of the 
Revolutionary War. I would respectfully recom- 
mend that the invitations be accepted and that a 
committee be appointed to represent the City 
Council on those notable occasions. 

Samuel 0. Cobb, Mayor. 

1775— Concord Fight— 1875. 
[Cut of minute man.] 
April 19, 1775. 
To the Honorable Samuel C. Cobb, Mayor: Sir — 
The inhabitants of the town of Concord, Massa- 
chusetts, cordially h'vite you and a committee of 
the City Government to be present as their guests 
at Concord on the nineteenth of April, 1875, and 
to join with them in celebrating the centennial 
anniversary of the opening of the Revolutionary 
War. E. R. Hoar. 

R. W. Emerson. 
George Heywood. 
Committee of Invitation. 

1 775— Lexington— IWS. 
April 10. 

Feb. 1, 1875. 
Sir — The citizens of this town have resolved to 
celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the battle 
of Lexington, on the 19th of April next. The Rev- 
olution which made us an independent nation is 
worthy of the highest consideration, and no lo- 
cality can be more appropriate for commemo- 
rating its opening scenes than the very spot 
wheie the first blood was shed, the first martyrs 
fell, and tbe first resistance in arms was offered 
to British aggression. It is proposed to arrange 
for the celebration of the day regardful of the 
broad historic interest which pertains to the 
event. The citizens of the country generally are 
invited to join in the observances. The promi- 
nent features of the day will consist of an ora- 
tion, the unveiling of the statues of John Han- 
cock and Samuel Adams— who had sought refuge 
from British proscription in Lexington, and were 
under its protection on that day— and a public 
dinner. It is expected that the occasion will be 
honored by the presence of the Executives of 
the United States and the State ot Massa- 
chusetts, representatives of the different de- 
partments of the National and State Govern- 
ments, literary and other organizations, aDd dis- 
tinguished individuals of tbe republic, whose 
words of eloquence and wisdom will add interest 
to the occasion. You are respectfully invited to 
be present with such representatives from the 



68 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



City Council as may be deemed appropriate for 
the occasion as the guests of the town. 
Charles Hudson. 
M. H. Merriam. 
W. H. Munroe. 

Committee on Invitations. 
Hon. Samuel C. Cobb, 

Mayor of Boston. 
Alderman Worthington offered the following: 
Resolved, That the invitations to the City Coun- 
cil of Boston from the authorities of the towns of 
Lexington and Concord, to send a committee to 
attend the ceritennial celebration of the battles of 
Lexington and Concord on tbe 19th of April next, 
be accepted, and that the chairman of the Board 
of Aldermen, the President of the Common Coun- 
cil, and the members of the Joint Special Com- 
mittee on the Centennial observance of the Sev- 
enteenth of June be appointed to accompany his 
Honor the Mayor to Lexington and Concord on 
the 19th of April next, and to represent this City 
Council on that occasion. 
Passed. 
Communication and resolve sent down. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF 
STREETS. 

Alderman Power presented City Document No. 
27, the annual report of the Superintendent of 
Streets. Sent down. 

The annual report of Charles Harris, Superin- 
tendent of Streets, was submitted in print. Prom 
this it appears that the amount expended and 
charged to the appropriation for Paving, etc., was 
$1,285,525.10; charged to appropriation for Burnt 
District, $341,160.97; charged to appropriation for 
"Washington-street Extension, $50,306.87; charged 
to appropriation for Washington and Essex Streets, 
$5919.81, charged to appropriation for Warren- 
street Widening, $935.92; total, $1,683,848.67. 
Amount expended in city proper, $396,644.92; 
amount expended for Roxbury , $184,283.02 ; amount 
expended for South Boston, $151,606.96 ; amount ex- 
pended for Dorchester,$103,224.01 ; amount expend- 
ed for West Roxbury, $87,546.16; amount expend- 
ed for Brighton, $71,613.48; amount expended for 
Charlestown, $101,357.67; amount expended for 
incidentals, $74,347.29; amount expended for 
grade damages, $17,877.44; amount charged to ap- 
propriation for Burnt District, $341,160.67; amount 
expended charged to appropriation for Washing- 
ton-street Extension, $50,306.87; amount expeuded 
for Washington and Essex streets, $5919.81 ; 
amount appropriated for paving, etc., for the 
present financial year 1874-5, was $1,300,000; total 
expenditures to Jan. 1, 1875, $1,132,417.37; balance 
of appropriation unexpended Jan. 1, 1875, 
$167,582.63 

The amount of bills for edgestones, construct- 
ing sidewalks, and sale of material, lodged with 
the Citv Treasurer tor collection during the year 
1874, was $83,506.38. The amount paid into the 
city treasury during the same perjod, and credit- 
ed as having been paid in by the Paving Depart- 
ment on account of work done by said depart- 
ment, was $42,718.80. 

The cost of the work done on the burnt district 
by the Paving Department in 1873, was $60,645.44; 
cost of work in 1874, $296,109.62 ; total cost of pav- 
ing, grading, etc., $356,755.06. Amount paid for 
damages caused to estates by the raising of the 
grade of the streets, $45,051.35. Total amount ex- 
pended and paid out under the direction of the 
Paving Department in 1873 and 1874, $401,806.41. 

There are several unsettled claims for grade 
damages on Kilby, Central and Water streets. 
The cost of the Washington-street extension, in- 
cluding the lowering of Cornhill and the raising 
of Brattle street to conform to the grade of Wash- 
ington street, was $50,306.87. Claims for grade 
damages on these streets remain unsettled. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PRINT- 
ING. 

Alderman Power presented City Document No. 
26, the third annual report of the Superintendent 
of Printing. Sent down. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Bigelow, for the Committee on Li- 
censes, submitted reports as follows: 

License for Billiard and Bowling Alley Trans- 
ferred—Howard Slade, 88-90 Court street, to Cor- 
delia J. Slade. 

Auctioneer's License Renewed— F. E. Hassard, 
302 Dudley street (changed from 47 Hanover 
street). 

Amusement Licenses Granted — Professor Tay- 
lor, for exhibitions of spiritual manifestations 



during February, March and April; John W. Mc- 
Donald, to give a variety entertainment at 289 
Washington street, March 17. 

Hack Licenses Granted — Daniel Heffernan, 96 
Church street; Thomas M. Doane, in front of 
•'Melodeon," on Washington street, after nine 
o'clocK P. M. ; Howard Slade, 92 Court street. 

Severally accepted. 

THE MODE OF MAKING SEWER ASSESSMENTS. 

Alderman Harris, for the Committee on Sewers, 
submitted the following : 

Ordered, That his Honor tbe Mayor be hereby 
authorized to petition the Legislature for a change 
in the statute relating to the assessment for the 
construction of sewers, as recommended in the 
annual report of the Superintendent of Sewers. 

Read twice and passed. Sent down. 

STREET DAMAGES. 

Alderman Harris, for the Committee on Streets 
on the part of the Board, submitted orders to pay 
for street damages, as follows : 

Heirs of Dennis O'Brien, $400, for widening of 
Magazine street; John M >ore, $2877.50, for widen- 
ing of Shawmut avenue; Herman W. Young, 
$1259.25, for widening of Shawmut avenue. 

Orders severally read once. 

REMOVAL OF TREES. 

Alderman Power, for the Committee on Com- 
mon on the part of the Board, submitted re- 
ports recom mending leave to withdraw on peti- 
tions ol Jesse U. Jones, for removal of tree at 
corner of Elm and Summer streets, Charlestown, 
and A. J. Carter, for removal of tree at corner of 
Main and Henley streets, Charlestown. Severally 
accepted. 

IIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Alderman Quincy, for the Joint Co mmittee on 
Fire Department, submitted the following: 

Ordered, That the expense of making a pho- 
nographic report of the inquest on the Are at 145 
Court street, amounting to $255, be allowed and 
paid from the appropriation for tbe Fire Depart- 
ment. 

Read twice and passed. Sent down. 

Ordered, That the Committee on the Fire De- 
partment be requested to consider the expediency 
of establishing the office of Fire Marshal, and to 
report whether any additional legislation is neces- 
sary to enable the City Council to appoint such an 
officer with power to investigate the origin and 
cause of fires. 

Alderman Harris— What is contemplated by this 
order? What are to be the duties of the Fire 
Marshal ? 

Alderman Quincy— This is only an order of in- 
auiry. If the Committee on Fire Department de- 
cide that it will be desirable to try the experi- 
ment of appointing such an officer, they will be 
ready with their explanation. All I can see now 
is that it has been found that the machinery for 
conducting a fire inquest is very clumsy, and that 
there is great necessity for establishing some 
machinery which can be put into action at once, 
in cases of incendiarism, especially where it is 
supposed that a place is set on fire to get the in- 
surance. It has been tried in New York with suc- 
cess. If the committee think it will be best to 
make the experiment, they will be ready to make 
any explanation. This older commits the Board 
to nothing, but if any application is to be made to 
the Legislature, it should be done at once before 
they shut down upon new business. 

The order was passed and sent down. 

GRADE OF BOSTON & ALBANY RAILROAD ON BACK 
BAY. 

Alderman Worthington offered the following : 
Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be requested 
to petition the General Court now in session for 
the passage of an act changing the location and 
grade of the Boston & Albany Railroad in that 
section of the city known as the Back Bay. 

Referred, on motion of Alderman Worthington, 
to the Committee on Streets on the part of this 
Board. Sent down. 

ROXBURY MUNICIPAL COURT ROOM. 

Alderman Prescott submitted the following: 
Ordered, That the Committee on County Build- 
ings be authorized to provide necessary furniture, 
fixtures and heating apparatus for the Municipal 
Court room in Boston Highlands,jrecently located 
in the old Washington Schoolhouse, at an expense 
not exceeding $1500 ; the expense to be charged 
to the appropriation for the County of Suffolk. 
Read once. 



FEBRUARY 18 



18 75 



69 



TRANSFER OF MARKET LEASE. 

Alderman Prescott, for the Committee on Mar- 
ket, submitted a report in favor of approval of 
transfer of lease of stall No. 105 Faneuil Hall Mar- 
ket, from Roger S. Mackintosh to Joseph H. Clark. 
Accepted. 

THE PUBLIC PARK. 

On motion of Alderman Harris, the Board took 
up the special assignment, viz., the order for the 
Mayor to petition the General Couit for authority 
to take lands for a public park and assess better- 
ments, the question being on Alderman Clark's 
amendment to provide rhat the act shall be ac- 
cepted by a majority of the citizens present at 
special legal meetings and voting thereon. 

Alderman Harris moved to amend the amend- 
ment by striking out the word "majorily" and in- 
serting instead the words "two-thirds." 

Alderman Prescott— I trust tbe Alderman from 
the Charlestown District will give us some reason 
why he offers this amendment. The general prin- 
ciple ie that '.he majority shall rule when the 
people are to pass upon important measures sub- 
mitted to them. I do not know why an exception 
should be made in this case. I hope the gentle- 
man will give some reason. 

Aldei man Harris— My experience in the Legis- 
lature has been tbat, in anything involving a 
lai'iie expenditure, where cities or towns ara af- 
fected, it was generally insisted upon that the 
vote authorizing those outlays of money should be 
a two-thirds' vote. That was the rule when the 
park question was voted on by the city before ; I 
remember distinctly — being in the Legislature at 
the time— that the act prescribed that it should 
be a two-thirds vote. If I am wrong, I wil' stand 
corrected. The Legislature at that time prescrib- 
ed a two-thirds instead of a majority vote. 

Allerman Burrage — It strikes me that tbe 
amendment just offered is a very proper one. We 
know that tbe taxes of last year bore very heavily 
upon a large class of our citizens ; this year, owing 
to die general interruption of business and shrink- 
age of values, they will be still more onerous; 
even wi th only the ordinary expenses of the Gov- 
ernment, baving in view the comfort and conven- 
ience of the people, we cannot materially reduce 
the rate this year. Therefore, before entering 
upon a matter of this magnitude, it seems to 
me that the orcier should be so framed that the 
taxpayers shall have adequate protection, as they 
would not have by a mere majority vote, as it is well 
known that a large number of people are willing 
to vote for appropriations of money who are not 
interested in the payment of taxes. It is no more 
than justice to the taxpayers that a two-thirds 
vote should be required, and that a measure of 
this kind should not be forced upon them against 
their will. 

Alderman Prescott asked for the yeas and nays, 
and the amendment of Alderman Harris was de- 
feated—yeas 6, nays 6. 

Yeas— Aldermen Burrage, Harris, Pope, Pbwer, 
S^ebbins, Viles— 6. 

Nays — Aldermen Bigelow, Clark, O'Brien, Pres- 
cott, Quincy, Worthington— 6. 

Alderman Stebbins — I offer the following as a 
substitute for the amendment of Alderman Clark: 

"Said act not to take effect unless accepted by a 
majority of all the votes cast in the several wards 
of the city at the next State election." 

Tbe amendment now before the Board provides 
for a special election to vote upon the question of 
establishing public parks. It is known to every 
member of this Board tbat at any special election 
the voters do not rome out unless brought out by 
those specially interested to secure the passage of 
the measure; by that amendment lean conceive 
tbat a large majority of the voters in favor of 
it can be brought out. I tbink the vote 
should be taken at the State election, when we 
are sure of a large vote beiag cast, and it should 
require a majority of the votes polled. If 50,000 
people vote for governor, it would then require 
25,001 to vote for the park to carry it. 

Alderman Worthington — I trust' this amendment 
will not pass. This is a subject of great impor- 
tance to the city, and has been debated for many 
years. We desire an exact expiession of opinion 
on this subject. It is known that when such a 
question is taken at the State election nothing is 
said about it; we hear nothing talked of except 
office holders; and no ballots are distributed; as 
was the case when we were voting for Chelsea — 
at some places there were no ballots 
at all. I believe it we have a special 
election we can get out moie people than at 



any other election. It will be a special subject; 
people will talk about it; the papers will take 
bold of it; people will learn about it and those 
who take an interest in park* will come out and 
vote, as well as those who oppose them. There- 
fore I think we should have a special election on 
this subject, that the people may vote upon it in- 
dependently and without reference to any other 
question. 

Alderman Power — It is very evident tbat the 
gentleman who has just taken his seat is afraid to 
trust this thing to the people, even under favora- 
ble circumstanc?s. At the first hearing before 
the Park Commission on this subject, Mr. J. B. 
Kendall presented a petition of 760 people repre- 
senting, as he said, $70,000,000 of improved flats 
on the Back Bay. How much would that be worth 
if there is no park to ce put there? How long- 
would they hesitate to spend $100,000 to get a park 
out there? They would be on the alert every mo- 
ment; but the city of Boston is not in the habit 
of paying vote distributors and rallying com- 
mittees in its wards when there is a sub- 
ject like annexation or any other subject to 
be considered; .they simply send an officer 
to each ward with tickets, but do not lure any 
one tc distiibute them. The advocates of a park 
would take care to have tickets and distributors 
in every ward for this purpose. If the gentleman 
is willing to give this a fair test, he cannot object 
to the amendment of the gentleman from Ward 8. 

Alderman Worthington — That is just the reason 
I desire it to go to the citizen's at a special 
election, so that we, may submit it to a fair vote 
of the people who pay taxes. Who fire going to 
pa> tbe taxes for a park? It is not the case tbat 
only those who favor such a measure will put out 
their money. We do not have elections all one 
way, but if the voters do not come out it shows 
tbat there is no opposition to it. The argument 
of the gentleman, if it is good for am thing, is 
that we should have a- special election, so that 
every man can know what he is going to vote 
for, — especially, that tbe people owning $70,000,000 
worth of property shall have a cl .ance to vote. It 
is not usually the case that such man are likely to 
come out and vote; they eschew politics and 
attend to their business; but if it comes up 
in the form of parks or no parks, men of property 
will take au interest in it. The gentleman says I 
am afraid to trust the people to vote upon it. 
Does he suppose there is a majority against it? 
If so, why does he oppose the special election ? If 
the people of Boston take an interest in this 
thing, they will come out and vote at a special 
election, and we shall have a fairer expression of 
opinion, for or against it, than we can have any 
other way . 

Alderman Quincy — I fail to see the truth of the 
remarks of the gentleman, tbat those who favor 
this measure will have a better chance at a special 
election than its opponents. If we have a special 
election, every man who goes to the poll« knows 
what he is going to vote for; whereas, when it 
is brought up as a side, issue his attention is then 
called to it for the first time, as was my own case 
at the last election. I did not know we were going 
to vote on annexation till I went to the ward- 
room. We should have a special election in this 
case, so that every one will know what he is vot- 
ing for. I cannot see why the opponents of a park 
would not have the same chance as those in favor 
of it. 

Alderman Power — The object must be apparent 
to everybody, as I said at the last meeting. lam 
opposed to spending money for anything except 
it is demanded by absolute necessity. I am op- 
posed to a park, but I am not going to hire men at 
an expense of $50 or $100 to stand in the ward- 
rooms and call the attention of citizens to the 
subject and opeu their eyes to the immense 
amount of debt it is going to put upon the city. I 
cannot afford to do this. But these people who 
own $70,000,000 wottb of property— it might be 
worth $70,000,000 if they got a park there, but it 
isn't worth $5,00(j,000 now— are they going to 
stop? No, sir; they will have men at the ward- 
rooms, coaxing and wheedling people to voteforit. 
Every man here knows that to be true. I cannot 
see why any gentleman can object to having this 
matter voted on at the State election. It will save 
a great expense, and be a great convenience to the 
public. The attention of the people will be called 
to it by the fact that it is connected with the State 
election. For instance, at the special election for 
Common Councilmen in Ward 11, the gentleman 
elected got eighty votes. The same rule would 
apply to a special election on this subject. 



70 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



Alderman O'Brien — I believe in allowing this 
park question to stand on its own merits. I have 
faith and confidence in the citizens of Boston and 
believe th<>t the representatives of $70,000,000 
conldjiot buy them. It is a question of great 
public importance, and'when a special election is 
called, men will turn out better and vote accord- 
ing to their consciences. I do not believe in this 
buying of votes, or that the representatives of this 
$70,000,000 are going to regulate and control this 
question against the wishes of the people. Some 
years ago the vote on the park question was 
largely in favor of it, and 1 believe if the ques- 
tion is put today it will stand the same. I hope 
we shall vote down the amendment of the gentle- 
man from Ward 8, so that the people can act upon 
the question upon its own merits. 

Alderman Stebbins— That is what I propose to 
do — to take it upon its own merits. I believe it 
can be best done at the annual State election. 
Now, we had a similar experience of voting upon 
the annexation, last year, of Chelsea. How was 
that managed ? Those who advocated the annex- 
ation of Chelsea to Boston had their agents in 
every ward urging everybody to vote in favor of 
it, while there was no organized opposition to 
that measure, and consequently there was not so 
large a number of votes thrown against it as there 
would have been had there been organized oppo- 
sition. This amendment calls for a majority of 
all the votes cast at che State election, and it then 
throws the responsibility directly upon the peo- 
ple. If they do not vote for it, that will show that 
they do not want it. 

Alderman Worthington — I wish to enter my pro- 
test against the assertion made here that the 
friends of the annexation of Chelsea had paid 
men in the wards. I know they had not. In 
"Ward 15 there was not a man who worked for it. I 
was in favor of annexation ana made inquiries, 
and went to a committee who took an interest in 
it. They said they did not pay out a cent. I said, 
"I feel that you have lost it by not looking after 
it." I know that was the reason Ward 15 did not 
go in favor of annexation. There was only one 
person employed in that ward, and he was op- 
posed to it. 

Alderman Stebbins— I made the statement 
which I did because I know it to be true, and I 
will tell you why : About a week previous to the 
election I was in the Barker House, and a gentle- 
man came up and inquired if my name was so and 
so. I replied that it was. I will omit his 
name; he was one of the largest real estate 
owners m Boston. He said he came to say that 
some men ought to be put into a certain ward im- 
mediately, and that all the other wards had been 
attended to. I said, "You are in search of a gen- 
tleman who resides in Chelsea, who is a namesake 
of mine," and he left. 

Alderman Presiott— One remark dropped by 
the gentleman from Ward 12, I hope the Board 
will remember and make a note of. He speaks 
of petitioners owning property worth $5,000,000 
that will be worth $70,000,000 when we have a 
park. That is one of the strongest arguments 
why we should give it favorable consideration. 
If we can improve property worth $5,000,000 and 
make it worth $70,000,000 it will be a gam of 
$65,000,000, and at the present rate of taxation 
that will give us sufficient to pay the gentleman's 
appropriation for paviag, one of the laigest made 
by the City Government. 

Alderman Power— I did not say it would be 
worth $70,000,000; but that is what they say. That 
was the way Mr. Kendall presented it, on their 
own valuation. Perhaps if a park is laid out they 
may get back the cost of the land, but I don't 
think it would be worth $70,000,000. I don't think 
it will be worth $5,000,000 for many years to come. 

Alderman Quincy — I hope the Board will look 
at the fact that the amendment requires a major- 
ity of all the votes cast for Governor, so that if 
there were three votes cast for Governor to one 
for the park and a majority should favor the park, 
it would still be defeated. 

The question on the substitute of Alderman 
Stebbins (requiring a majority of all the votes 
cast at the State election) was taken by yeas and 
nays, at the call of Alderman Worthington, and it 
was lost — yeas 6, nays 6. 

Yeas— Aldermen Burrage, Harris, Pope, Power, 
Stebbins, Viles— 6. 

Nays— Aldermen Bigelow, Clark, O'Brien, Pres- 
cott, Quincy, Worthington— 6. 

The amendment of Alderman Clark (providing 
for a majority vote at a special election) was then 
adopted, and the question was on the passage of 
the order as amended. 



Alderman Power— I don't know that I have any- 
thing more to say on this subject than I have said 
already; but at the last meeting the Chairman of 
this Board made a great many quotations from 
the Board of Health and the Park Commission, 
to show that the particular necessity for this park 
is to secure good drainage. Now, sir, it may be 
inferred from the minority report on this park 
question, wherein, notwithstanding my assent 
"in general terms to the foregoing report, I 
desire to have it appear as part of the record that 
I am opposed to aDy measure that will involve 
the expenditure of money at this time, the city 
being heavily ,- n debt, the taxes for mu- 
nicipal purposes very high, and all kinds 
of business in an unusually depressed con- 
dition" — I don't think there is any room for 
doubt about that — but I might be misunder- 
stood by what I mean by "assenting in general 
terms." I mean that I do 'not deny the advantage 
of parks in general ; I don't deny that they en- 
hance the value of property; I do not deny "that 
they may be beneficial in a sanitary view, but I do 
not wish to be understood as assenting to all the 
sanitary statistics quoted by this Park Commis- 
sion. This seems to be the strongest foundation 
for a park. They say — 

"Vital statistics have shown the effects of the 
introduction of sunlight, of pure water and air, 
into our dwellings and cities, and engineering has 
shown us the best methods of introducing them. 
Any one who will take up the recent work on the 
subject by Mr. Baldwin Latham, will see what 
great conquest has here been made." 

This seems to be the basis of their argument for 
taking the land in question for a park. Now, Mr. 
Chairman, as at our last meeting, on the question 
of sewerage, the Board of Health was quoted to 
strengthen the argument in favor of parks, and to 
make it appear that it is absolutely necessary, to 
preserve the health of the city of Boston, to have 
this particular lot of land taken for a park, and as 
in those remarks the matter of the sewerage of 
the city of Boston was alluded to, of course, as a 
member of the Committee on Sewers for the last 
four years, it is reasonable to suppose — if gentle- 
men give me credit for any fair share of intelli- 
gence or competency to deal with subjects en- 
trusted to me— thatl have learned something of the 
drainage and sewerage o% the city of Boston. I 
have given it a great deal of attention in the four 
years I have been here; I was a member of the 
committtee before the Board of Health was in ex- 
istence, and I say it is not reasonable to suppose 
that, with the little time that they could give to 
it, they could begin to know as much auout the 
drainage of the city of Boston as I do, or as does 
the Superintendent of Sewers, who has been at 
the head of that department for thirteen years. 
I "have taken some pains to get statistics arid fig- 
ures, with the assistance of the Superintendent 
of Sewers, which I will give this Board to re- 
fute the remarks made on this question at our 
last meeting. I have another reason for do- 
ing it: The interests of the city of Boston 
are and should be dear to every one of us. I hold 
that nothing has been done for the last two or 
three years that damaged and did so much harm 
as these reports and reiterated statements of the 
increased death rate of the city of Boston. Thev 
have tried to make it the most unhealthy place in 
the country, and such statements from persons 
supposed to know something of it are greatly 
damaging to the interests of the city. Therefore, 
I have taken some pains to" show to the public that 
there is no foundation for them, that they are un- 
true, and that they will not stand the test of inves- 
tigation, and that Boston, instead of being the 
most unhealthy, is the healthiest city in the 
United States today. All the quotations in regard 
to Dure air, drainage, etc., refer and bear directly 
upon the improvement of the air and surround- 
ings within and about the habitations of the peo- 
ple. No statistics can be quoted showing that the 
general condition of the atmosphere in a city has 
any perceptible or accountaole effect upon the 
death rate ; on the contrary the English commis- 
sioners on "Pollution of Rivers" say of Manches- 
ter (where the river is but an open sewer some 150 
feet wide, and more filthy than any sewer in 
Boston), "The greater or less filthiriess of the 
river is a variation so slight in the causes 
affecting health, that no separate effect can 
be detected. The density of population is 
the governing cause." The Park Commission- 
ers say in their report on page 9, that 
"more than 150,000 people will then be living 
between Arlington street and Parker's Hill. This 
district is a natural cesspool; from its centre the 



FEBRUARY 18, 1875 



71 



land rises to the Highlands of Roxbury, to Par- 
ker's Hill, and even towards Washington and Ar- 
lington streets. If it toe filled to the grades of 
twelve feet above mean low water for the cellars 
and eighteen feet ror the streets, which are the 
ones established for what has been hitherto filled, 
there will be a large and densely populated dis- 
trict, into and over which will flow the surface 
drainage and much of the filth from an extensive 
tract of a higher level nearly all around it. It is 
easy to predict that the death rate, not only of 
that district but of the whole city, will be alarm- 
ingly increased uifess stringent measures are 
adopted to prevent such misimprovement." 

This, Mr. Chairman, seems to me to be perfect 
nonsense, in the face and eyes of the statistics. 
The cesspool described can never exist any more 
than the old condition of filth, precisely similar, 
which existed in the BackBay, where the railroads 
now crois, and where Dartmouth stieet and Hun- 
tington avenue show their splendid public build- 
ings. As soon as the march of improvement 
renders it necessary to fill it, it can be prop- 
erly drained. On page ten the Commissioners say — 

"This serious aspect of the death rate in Boston 
Will become still mote serious in the future, and 
in a future that is close at hand, if the territory 
which we have described is not laid out with wise 
forethought. There is no part of the city as con- 
stituted today that requires more careful'sanitary 
engineering than this." 

Now I mean to snow that these deductions are 
wrong. But are typhoid and other levers generated 
by any air diffused in our city, even by that in the 
immediate vicinity of the worst spot we have, 
viz., the Stony Brook sewer at Parker street, 
which is going to kill everybody unless that land 
is bought for a park? Any unprejudiced physi- 
cian will say (and some facts can be auoted* to 
sustain it) that the air confined in a house by im- 
perfect local arrangements for drainage is in- 
finitely more provocative of disease than the air 
breathed in our streets. The air of Manchester 
is so bad (says the Local Government Board Re- 
port in 1874) that vegetation is utterly im- 
possible within the city limits ; yet the 
death rate is but thirty per 1000. But what 
are the faces about this full basin? A large 
sewer there empties upon flats belonging to 
the "Water Power and some twenty other land 
companies who want the city to buy it for a park, 
and therefore make out that it is a nuisance. 

Alderman Stebbins — Will the gentleman give us 
the names of the land companies? perhaps they 
would be of interest. I should like to know them. 

Alderman Power— Yes sir, I can give the names. 
As I said before, those people have joined together 
to make it a nuisance. The principal mover of it 
was this Mr. Kendall, who appeared to get the 
city of Boston indicted for letting this sewer 
empty out there unon land which belongs to the 
Boston Water Power Company, South End Land 
Company, Boston Land Association, Back Bay 
Land Company, Newbury-street Land Associates, 
Western-avenue Associates, Boylston-street Land 
Associates, West Boston Land Association, Frank- 
lin Haven and others, G. T. W. Braman and oth- 
ers, G. Washington Warren and others, William 
Aspinwall and others, George Griggs and others, 
D. N. Skillings & Co., and Drew & Bearse. Those 
are the parties who own this land, and it any of 
you gentlemen attended the hearings on this park 
question you might have seen those land com- 
panies pretty fairly represented. 

Alderman Worthington — Did the gentleman at- 
tend the hearings? 

Alderman Power— I had the honor to be one of 
the commission — perhaps the Alderman may have 
forgotten it. 

Alderman Worthington— Were you present at 
any of the hearings? 

Alderman Power — Yes, sir. 

Alderman Worthington — How many? 

Alderman Power— I can't recollect, exactly, but 
I remember one large one, and I saw many repre- 
sentatives of these companies on that occasion. 
At the last meeting the chairman of this Board re- 
marked— 

"I contend that we by our votes today should 
authorize the Mayor to obtain or try to obtain 
from the Legislature the authority necessary to 
control the so-called full basin to properly sewer 
and drain this section of the city, which cannot be 
properly drained without it. the whole of the 
property necessary for this enterprise is in dan- 
ger of being lost to us by being hlied up and built 
upon." 

What better remedy would there be to abolish 



a nuisance than to fill it up? That is the remedy, 
gentlemen, which has been resorted to. So I 
think the danger to be apprehended from that is 
not serious. As soon as it is physically possible, 
all the sewage will be removed from this basin 
without any refereuce as to whether it is a park 
or not, and within a few years, in any event, and 
if made a full basin of high water, it will have 
but slight reference to any system of drainage, 
and can only affect those sewers in its immediate 
neighborhood, so that the question of drainage 
and nuisance has no reference to this question of 
park, notwithstanding the efforts of interested 
parties to connect them. But the Park Commis- 
sioners, the Board of Health, and the Chair- 
man of the Board of Aldermen say that the air 
from this sewer is killing people. Now. imme- 
diately north and east of this poisonous outlet 
there is a settlement, known as Gravelly Point, of 
some 200 or 300 people, subject to every whiff of 
this air which a south or west wind brings them; 
people whose conditions of life aie not more 
favorable to longevity than the average, living on 
a maish, poor and principally foreigners, and 
with large families. The facts are, that while the 
average death rate has been twenty-six m 1000 
for five years in the city, the deaths there have 
been but eleven per 1000, and in that time but 
three of typhoid or kindred diseases. They think 
it the healthiest place in Boston. Concerning what 
was ..-aid about air in houses, I know of two 
houses in Roxbury, in one of which were eleven 
cases of typhoid and in the other six, both caused 
by house drainage not carried into the sewers 
(which were in good order), but running under 
floors and poisoning the confined air of the house. 
This is what kills, and for which the Boat d of 
Health should find and apply a cure, for the sew- 
ers are in the immediate vicinity and in good or- 
der, but the houses are not connected with them. 
Now, sir, I quote again what the Chairman said 
on this subject: 

"Recent developments in regard to the large in- 
crease in the death rate make it imperative that 
this most vital of all our conditions, the health of 
our people, should receive without delay the con- 
sideration of tiiis body, and that ever> means 
should be used which may seem to be necessary 
for the accomplishment of this end. We are 
placed here, Mr. Chairman, as the guardians of 
the health and lives of the. people, the poor as well 
as the rich, and we shall prove unfaithful to our 
trust if we longer pass unheeded the admoni- 
tions which we have received from so many 
sources and from our own knowledge of the facts. 
I believe, sir, that the health of the entire south- 
ern Back Bay section of our city is seriously af- 
fected at the present time, and will continue to toe 
more and more endangered in the future by the 
poisonous influences which come from an imper- 
fect and inadequate system of drainage. The 
great sewer which drains a large section of the 
Highlands, and which takes the sewage of all the 
principal breweries, terminates on the west side 
of Parker stieet, and spreads its filth over hun- 
dreds of acres of flats, and the air which should 
prove such a blessing during the heats of summer 
is filled with the poisonous stench, and is cairied 
into every section of the city, the promoter of 
sickness and death instead of heal tlf and its at- 
tendant blessings." 

That js what the gentleman said of the facts, 
but if any gentleman can contradict the state- 
ments I have made, I should like to see him do it. 
flit the death rate of Boston is not increasing, 
iit decreasing rapidly. In 1872 it was 30.4, in '73, 
28.4 per 1000; in 1874, judging by these reports 
and the numerous articles with which the news- 
papers are teeming, it should be greater than ever, 
certainly over thirty; but the Registrar reports 
that it is but twenty-three ; as gooa as any city in 
the country. Yes, there were actually in 1874, not- 
withstanding the addition of West Roxbury, 
Brighton and Charlestown, fifty-seven less deaths 
than in the Boston of 1873, and the rate has not 
declined to as low a figure for ten years. Then the 
gentleman from Ward 6 at the last meeting said — 

"It is a fact which cannot be winked out of sight 
that the city of Boston, which ought to be the 
most healthy, is one of the most unhealthy cities 
of the United States." 

And when the Alderman on my left [Alderman 
Harrisl said, "Will the gentleman give his author- 
ity?" the gentleman replied — 

"My authority comes from the city and State 
boards of health, and the most competent physi- 
cians." 

Where are the facts that cannot be wmked out 



7a 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



of sight or contradicted? And yet these sewers 
have been poisoning the atmosphere, and the 
death rate is something fearful, according to the 
statements of these land speculators. To their 
theories here are facts. In regard to the drainage 
of Boscon, the Committee on Sewers, in their re- 
port of 1873, show that we are not utterly devoid 
of a system of sewerage. 

"Some notice may be taken here of the reiterated 
statements that "we have no system of sewerage," 
or "a bad system," and thac we need some "com- 
prehensive plan" for the drainage of the city — re- 
citing the story of flooded cellars, offensive odors 
and a shoaling harbor, and pointing to some great 
scheme for diverting drainage from Charles River 
and carrying it southward to Dorchester Bay. Our 
system of drainage is as perfect, though not so 
complicated, as that of any other city. We are fa- 
vored by location with generally good grades and 
outlets to deep water; and though we have 
no long lines composed of huge sewers 
with their many branches, with pumping works 
and flushing apparatus, yet the removal of the 
sewage from the house to tne ebbinti' tide in the 
harbor is rapid and complete, and that is a.perf ect 
system. We have probably more than 5000 cellars 
or basements below extreme high water, which, 
with few exceptions, are perfectly drained; but 
after a heavy storm the newspapers invariably re- 
port the flooding of cellars in the low parts of 
New York, Brooklyn and Baltimore. In the drain- 
age of the surface of streets and in the appliances 
for protecting cellars from tide water, our system 
is probably better than that of any otber city. 
The offensive odors which every summer afflict 
the south and west parts of the city are but in 
small degiee traceable to sewers. The most 
prominent cause has been the exposure of mud 
banks by the tilling of the basin of the Water 
Power Company and the stagnation of a large 
body of shoal water. Both this year and last, as 
soon as fresh cold water was permitted to flow in, 
the offence ceased. Our sewerage system had no 
more to do with this than with the frequent visits of 
sickening odors from the shores of Miller's Kiver. 
But it is said that Charles River is becoming a 
vast cesspool, that it is growing shoaler by sewer 
deposits, and enormous mud banks ai e forming in 
its channel; and that it has become what the 
Thames was to London, and a similar remedy 
must be employed and the sewage car- 
ried southward to the harbor. Perhaps all this 
may come true in the future, when Boston 
shall rival London in size and population; but it 
is undoubtedly now all false. A simple inspection 
will suffice to show that the river does not yet suf- 
fer from the amount of drainage it receives, being 
pure enough tor bathing purposes ; and it is a fact 
indorsed by the Harbor Commissioners that there 
is no trace of sewage deposit in the harbor, and 
that the growth of the shoal in Charles River 
above Cambridge Bridge is due entirely to the 
growth of the oyster beds." 

That is what the Cominiitee on Sewers of that 
year state. In addition to this, if anybody would 
consult the death rate, as given here a week or 
two ago, and see that almost one-half of the num- 
ber of those de.thsweie caused by pneumonia 
and consumption, which shows that this matter 
has very little to do with it. The deaths in 1873 
were 7869, and m 1874, 7812, making the late 22.3 
per thousand in a population of 350,000. 
If the excessive number of deaths at this season 
from consumption and pneumonia could be de- 
ducted, amounting to one-third of all the deaths, 
Boston would be the healthiest city in the coun- 
try. Boston has watei enough already around it, 
and its effects are not always beneficial to health 
or climate. One acre of grass or forest is 
worth the whole of Back Bay. I have quoted 
this matter somewhat for the reason that this 
Park Commission seem to think the sewer- 
age question is of the greatest importance 
in this matter. Another matter must be consid- 
ered. Every gentleman must remember that the 
proportion of poor people who are compelled to 
live packed in closely together, in dirty, filthy 
places, to those who live in comfortable houses, 
is greater now than it was a year or two ago, be- 
cause they increase more rapidly in numbers and 
remain in the city proper, while the other classes 
have gone to the outlying wards and surrounding 
towns. Consequently, if there is a great increase 
in the death rate of the city of Boston it 
would not follow that the city is getting any 
more unhexlthy than it was. In -refer- 
ence to the statements of the Board of 
Health, I do not desire to quarrel with 



them or find any fault with them so far as this 
matter applies here. I have alluded to them, but 
I wish to say that I have no doubt that for the 
time they have been studying the "subject they 
have gained as much knowledge as any gentle- 
men can have in so short a time. Sometime 
ago the Committee on Sewers had a consultation 
with them and there was very little difference of 
opinion as to the way or relieving this evil. But 
to the park question again: The same persons 
who were conspicuous at these hearings are the 
very same persons who were conspicuous in hav- 
ing the city of Boston indicted for maintaining this 
nuisance and cited the Board of Health before 
the Grand Jury. Then the Committee on Sewers 
got an order passed to build a sewer there, and 
those same people came in and said they did n't 
want the sewer, and it is cheaper for the city to 
buy it and make a park than to build a sewer. 
There is just as strong a pressure now to stop the 
building of a sewer as there was to get tne 
city indicted for maintaining that nui- 
sance. No; those people don't want a 
sewer; the.v bring a pressure here to make the 
city buy this land for a public park. , There 
is another aspect of this question. Any one 
who has investigated the subject must know that 
there are a large number of real estate specu- 
lators who see no way to get their money back and 
build up their broken fortunes than by getting 
the city to take these la^ ds and pay enoimous 
prices for then. That is all the demand there is 
for a, public park. Then, there is the plausible 
rea?cn that if we obtain this authority it can do 
no harm, and that you need n't exercise the power 
if you don't want it. Any gentleman here knows 
the effect of obtaining such power. Immediately 
all the:e companies will begin to do something to 
get the city's foot into it. They are already hard at 
work. Gentlemen of this Board have been invited 
to examine plans. Of course it is a beautiful thing 
to contemplate; the pictures they have drawn are 
very enticing. But, sir, the greatest curse, as I 
have remarked before, to any country is a high 
rate of taxation. We all know the taxpayers ex- 
pect us to economize in every way we possibly 
can, and therefore we should n't take any steps at 
present towards committing the city of Boston to 
this project. I will not detain this Board any fur- 
ther, but will close by expressing the hop e that 
the order will not pass. 

Alderman Power in the chair. 

Alderman Clark— I did not expect to have occa- 
sion to make any further remarks upon this im- 
portant subject, and I really do not think there is 
occasion for f.ny remarks now. The argument of 
the gentleman from Ward 12 is the most labored 
one 1 ever heard him attempt to make. He has 
tried to convince this Board that we contemplate 
going out and buying a lot of land from the Bos- 
ton Water Power Company, or some land specula- 
tors, for the purpose of improving the drainage of 
the city of Boston. Th&t is not what this order 
contemplates. It is only requesting the Legisla- 
ture to confer upon the City Council the right to 
improve the drainage of the city, and if the City 
Council deem it expedient or think it necessary to 
improve the drainage of the city, they will exer- 
cise that right. It does not contemplate the ex- 
penditure of a single dollar unless this Board of 
Aldermen votes it. Not a dollar. So much for 
that. I am surprised that an Alderman, who usu- 
ally advocates his measures with so much force 
and clearness, should come here and attempt to 
convince an intelligent body like this that the 
drainage of the city of Boston at the South End 
and on the Back Bay is all that can be 
asked for. It is n't six months ago, gentle- 
men, that one of the employes of the City 
Government was obliged to move his family 
from his dwelling house and send them into 
the country because the neighborhood was so 
affected by the drainage there that his children 
were taken sick and the only way he could save 
their lives was to put them into the country. And 
that is the state of the drainage on and near Bea- 
con street. Those facts are susceptible of proof 
if any member of the Board desires it. I expect- 
ed that an argument would be brought here that 
would entirely demolish the statements made 
at the last meeting. But I have n't heard a single 
argument. Those statements cannot be contro- 
verted. The facts are that in 1872 the death rate 
in Boston was the highest of any Northern city 
but one. 

Alderman Harris— That was the year of the epi- 
demic. 

Alderman Clark— I submit that the epidemic 



FEBRUARY 18, 1875 



73 



prevailed in other cities as well as Boston. It 
was notorious that the smallpox was just as bad 
in other cities as in Boston. But how did it com- 
pare in 1870? Baltimore, New Orleans, Detroit, 
Boston. In 1872 they all had the epidemic, and in 
the Southern States'the epidemics occur annually, 
but the record is Charleston, Savannah. Hobo- 
ken (N. J.)— everybody knows that is a place 
where a decent mm ought not to stay 
over an hour — Vicksburg, Boston. I submit, 
gentlemeB, that is the way the record 
stands, and whether that state of things 
should remain. I get my information from the 
same source as the gentleman from Ward 12 got 
his — the City Registrar, and for the information 
of the Board let me rei?d it. The Registrar of 
Boston, in his annual report for 1873, comments 
on che vital statistics which he presents as follows : 

"From an examination of the foregoing tables 
it is evident that Boston cannot be congratulated 
on its sauitary condition. Without the prevalence 
of any epidemic, except scarlatina and smallpox, 
the former existing to no greater extent than for 
a number of years past, and the latter disappear- 
ing in July last, the death rate appears in the 
ratio of 28.45 in a thousand. In three years only 
(1853, 1854 and 1872) within the last twenty-five has 
the rate reached the present one. In 1851 and 1864 
it was twenty-seven in a thousand, and in 1859 it 
had fallen to 21.4. For the ten years ending 
with the last-named year, the average rate was 
25.2; and, in the ten years ending with 1869, it was 
23.7. In 1870 it was 24.3 ; in 1871 it was 23.5, and in 
1872 it jumped to 30.5. The prevalence of small- 
pox in the past year, the only unusual disease 
noticeable during that period, will account for a 
portion of the large mortality ; but it will be seen 
that with the subsidence of that disease, the 
death rate still remained at an unpleasant altitude. 
To those who are familiar with vital statistics and 
are able to read their meaning, the sudden in- 
crease of the death rate from 23.5 in a thousand 
in 1871, which was preceded by a similar condition 
for a series of years, to 30.5 in 1872, and this in 
turn followed by the rate of 28.4 m 1873, the sub- 
ject assumes a very serious aspeot." 

I am very glad to know that in the year 1874, by 
the unusual exertions of the Board of Health, the 
death rate in Boston has been diminished. We 
are told it is only 23 ; if we had proper sewerage it 
would not be 15. Gentlemen will bear in mind 
that the year 1874 was an unusually healthy year 
all over the United States ; such a healthy year 
has npver beea known; such a winter and sum- 
mer for good health were never known. Now if you 
get the statistics of other cities, you will find 
that the ratio of decrease is the same in other 
cities. It has diminished in New York as 
well as here and elsewhere. But that does 
not alter the fact that because the death rate of 
Boston has diminished in 1874, this city is not one 
of the most unhealthy cities in the Union. In this 
city, where the atmosphere is contaminated by 
bad drainage, the rate has been twenty-eight in 
the thousand, while in New York, which is sup- 
posed to be the most unhealthy city in the North- 
ern States, the rate is onlv thirty-two I think. 
In three years only— 1853, 1854,and 1872— during the 
last twenty-five, has the rate been more than the 
present one. In 1859 it fell to twenty-one, and in 
1871 it was twenty-three. The words I have read 
are those of Mr. Apollonio, the City Registrar. 
No Action about them, gentlemen. 

"This serious aspect of the death rate in Boston, 
to which the Registrar has so earnestly called the 
attention of its citizeus, will become still more 
serious in the future, and in a future that is close 
at hand, if the territory which we have described 
is not laid out with wise forethought. There is no 
part of the city as constituted today that requires 
more careful sanitary engineering than this." 

Those words were writttn by one of the most 
eminent physicians in Boston. Now, the death 
rate in Boston in 1872 was thirty ; in 1873, with no 
smaLpox, twenty-eight and a little over; in 1874, 1 
am happy to say, it is reouced to twenty-three. I 
am a little surprised at tha;, because I proposed to 
show that it was twenty-two ; but while it is 
twenty-three in a thousand, with proper drainage 
it would not be fifteen. He acknowledged over 
his own signature that he agreed with the main 
points of the report of the Park Commission and 
admitted the necessity for having certain 
things done to improve the sanitary con- 
dition of the city, but in the general 
stagnation of business he did n't want to go into 
an expenditure of money for a public park. We 
do not propose to do that now, but we do propose 



to use every means in our power to improve the 
healthfulness of our city; that is our duty, it is a 
part of the business we are expected to perform 
here. There is no question in my mind but that 
the Committee on Sewers, during the past and 
previous years, have done all they can for the 
construction of sewers. But we don't want sewers 
constructed in the wav they build them. It is no 
way to build a sewer to leave it emptying out into 
the flats, where it poisons the air in the houses 
near by. 

Alderman Harris — Does not the tide ebb and 
flow at all those outlets? 

Alderman Clark — That is what I object to. It 
takes the matter down on the ebb tide and swash- 
es it back again. If the Alderman is in doubt, let 
him go down to Beacon street and see the effect 
of the tide floating back rhe sewage matter upon 
the flats. During the administration of Mayor 
Gaston, the Board of Aldermen were invited and 
went down there, and they saw the emptying of 
this sewage back upon the flats, and lying there 
in the hot weather. That is a faet which cannot 
be ignored. You have got to take hold of this 
subject as you would that of pure water. 
You cannot have pure water so long as 
you allow it to be taken up anywhere 
and distributed all over the city. We 
don't ask to take any property of the Boston 
Water Power Company. Not a dollai of it. I 
don't believe they own half as much property out 
there as the Alderman from Ward 12 thinks. I 
have no doubt that many persons who signed the 
petitions for a park are more or less interested in 
land ; but when you say nobody else besides real 
estate owners is interested in this thing, it is a 
mistake. Those most interested in this sub- 
ject are such men as Drs. Clarke and Bow- 
ditch; the latter thought the statements made 
here in regard to the sanitary condition of the 
city were not strong enough. 1 took the 
trouble to call upon him and upon the 
secretary of the State Board of Health, and I was 
informed of one fact, which the Alderman from 
the Bunker Hill District, should bear in mind, that 
the sewage which comes down from Cambridge 
and the Miller's River District is emptied right 
down upon the flats and carried back by the tide 
before it can be taken out into the channel. 

Alderman Harris — Has not that sewer been con- 
structed by a commission appointed by the State? 

Alderman Clark— I can only state what I was 
told by Dr. Bowditch. 

Alderman Harris — One of the commissioners on 
the construction of that sewer is a member of the 
State Board of Health. 

Alderman Clark — It is not properly constructed 
unless the sewage is carried out into deep water. 
That is what we want. We don't ask the right to 
take land frem Mr. Kendall, or the Boston Water 
Power Company, or anybody else. But we want, 
after the subject is investigated by a competent 
commission, and we And it necessary, to have the 
power to avail ourselves of the right to improve 
our drainage, and that is all. 

Alderman Stebbins— If I understand the Alder- 
man right, this order does not apply for authority 
to lay out public parks at all, but simply to im- 
prove the drainage, and is not applicable to the 
taking of land, in West Roxbury and Dorchester 
at all. 

Alderman Clark — I do not propose to spend any 
money at all for this purpose during the present 
year, nor until the people vote upon it, but I do 
propose that this sanitaiy question shall be looked 
into this year. 

Alderman Stebbins — Then I suppose the order 
will have to be rewritten, so that the Mayor shall 
petition for authority to improve the vjharles River 
basin . 

Alderman Clark— Any amendment which this 
Board of Aldermen see fit to pass will be satisfac- 
tory to me if it will promote this object. We have 
an able Committee on Legislative Matters at the 
State House and I think they will look after the 
wants of the people. 

Alderman Stebbins— That is precisely what I 
want to know. I supposed it was to take land for 
parks in West Roxbury and Dorchester. We 
ought to have that settled before it goes to the 
Legislature. 

Alderman Clark— I was a member of the Park 
Commission, and saw people come there and ad- 
vocate a park who do not own a dollar's worth of 
real estate in any neighborhood where a park 
would be likely to be located. Many people came 
there who said they owned real "estate which 
would be benefited by the park. 



74= 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



Alderman Worthington — A.nd were williug to 
pay a betterment? 

Alderman Clark— Yes, and 1 hope that when the 
act is passed the city will be allowed to assess 
betterments. I believe it is necessary, in order 
to give us better drainage, to have the right to 
take land for this purpose, and if we find is best 
to use the full hasin for the purpose ot flushing- 
out the sewers, as has been suggested hy the very 
able and compete; t Superintendent of Sewers 
employed by the city of Bostou, then let us have 
that right. My ideas in regard to that came orig- 
inally from the Superintendent of Sewers of this 
city. I am not an engineer. I do not know 
that that is the best way to construct sewers, hut I 
have always supposed that the lay of the land 
was such that the sewers could be easily flushed 
out. If ft is necessary to take this land, which is 
the breeder of disease, and till it with salt water, 
and if tbe city chooses to embellish it, as they did 
the driveway around Chestnut Hill reservoir, and 
assess hetterments on the adjoining pioperty, 
you can call it a water park, or what you choose. 
But there is no occasion for taking land in 
"West Roxbury for that purpose. It does not 
seem to have heen proved here that the 
ceath rate is smaller; it has undoubtedly 
been shown that the mortality in 1874 lias dimin- 
ished, but that is so in all the principal cities of 
the country. Another reason is because we have 
a good Board of Health, who are at work night 
and day, using all their powers to improve the 
sanitary condition of the city. They have abated 
during the last year no less than 18,000 nuisances, 
and I believe the increased healthfullness of the 
city in 1874 is due in a very great measure to the 
attention which this same Board of Health have 
given to this subject. There was until last season 
a common sewer — not constructed by the city, I 
admit — which had no outlet at all, and drained a 
larsre number of dwellings. It became filledup, 
and the sewage backed up into the houses of 
Fairfield street. But the attention of the Commit- 
tee on Sewers was called to it and an outlet asked 
to be made. It was the duty of the city of Boston 
to make it — 

Alderman Harris — Was not the gentleman him- 
self president of the corporation which con- 
structed that sewer? 

Alderman Clark— No, sir, I was not, and had 
nothing to do with it whatever. I think it was 
carried across to Beacon street last year by the 
Committee on Sewers, and the sewage is dumped 
out there on the flats. We all feel, I pre- 
sume, in regard to the high rate of taxa- 
tion, as does the Alderman from Ward 12, but we 
had better cut down all other expenses than re- 
duce the appropriation for sewers, and let this 
state of things continue longer. It is humiliating 
i hat the city of Boston should let it go fortb that 
we have no efficient system of sewerage, in con- . 
sequence of which the death rate is rapidly in- 
creasing and likely to increase ; and it is our duty 
to take all steps in our power to find the remedy 
for this great evil. It is for that purpose that we 
want the Mayor to petition the Legislature for 
authority to place the city in a condition to abate 
this evil. 

Alderman Burrage — It seems to me that the 
question of sewerage and a public park are en- 
tirely different. Many of us would favor a large 
outlay for improved facilities for sewerage, but 
to connect it with this question the order should 
be altered so as to meet the scope of the argu- 
ment. I cannot see what the argument for good 
drainage has to do with the question of public 
parks. lam willing to vote for an improvement 
of the drainage system, if that is desired. 

Alderman Clark— If it can be found that the 
land about there can be improved so that a water 
park can be constructed, it will add very much to 
the beautv of the city, and certainly no section of 
the city will be move benefited than that which 
the gentleman represents. 

Alderman Burrage— That depends on whether 
it is drainage or a public park. 

Alderman Clark— If it is the best way to im- 
prove the drainage of the city by constructing 
sewers so that the water can be turned in at the 
full tide to flush out the sewers and carry off the 
matter into deep water, then a salt basin can be 
constructed there, ana of course the adjoining 
lands will be much improved. 

Alderman Burrage— But that is notwhat this re- 
port suggests. 

Alderman Clark— I am willing to intrust this 
matter into the hands of the whole Board, to do 



what is best for the interest of the city when the 
right is granted them. 

Alderman O'Brien— So far as I am concerned, I 
do not* mean that this park question shall he 
changed altogether to one of sewerage. The 
measuie before us is not only a park, but a 
series of parks, and that is what I am voting, 
for. I am not surprised that such a great 
improvement should meet with opposition. 
Every great improvement has been met by 
the same kind of argument of increased tax- 
ation and ruin of credit. Take the intro- 
duction of pure water, thirty or forty years ago — 
the city was co be ruined by increased taxation. 
But it is not ruined yet. If you will look at the 
Auditor's report you will find that the appropria- 
tions of the City Council run almost exclusively 
into one channel. We spend millions of dollars 
for widening and improving stree. s. Last year 
$6,400,000 were taken out of the treasury for im- 
proving streets, and during the last hours of the 
session street improvements were voted that will 
cost something like half a million dollars. 

Alderman Harris— We appropriated no such 
sum as six millions for widening streets last year. 

Alderman O'Brien — The Auditor's report of last 
year states that six millions were drawn from the 
city treastrry for street widenings. If there is an 
epidemic abroad, I think it is one for street widen- 
ing. I believe we have some other things to 
attend to besides street widenings. The health of 
our people should be of as great consideration to 
us as street openings and widenings. It is as 
important to have a breathing place for our peo- 
ple as it is to lay out streets, and I am sorry that 
tbe gentlemen who have spoken on this question 
have confounded it with that of sewerage. 

Alderman Quincy — I believe it is a park and not 
a sewerage question. If incidentally we can use 
it to improve our sewerage, so much the better; 
but I believe it is a great mistake to present the 
question as one of sewerage, which I think is sec- 
ondary in this instance. 

Alderman Power — The gentlemen have tried to 
relieve this matter of the foundation that the 
park commissioners gave it. But the question of 
sewerage has been brought into it as one of the 
most important reasons for a park. I must say 
that until this question came up nothing was ever 
said against the sewerage of Boston. AVe have 
just given the Superintendent of Sewers a unani- 
mous vote for leeleetion, and if we have no 
system those who voted for him ought to be 
ashamed of themselves. The gentleman alludes 
to the Fail field-street sewer. The Committee on 
Sewers did n't spend the city's money to do 
what the Water Bower Company agreed to do 
themselves, and that is the company which want- 
ed us to advance money on work to be done there. 

Alderman Worthinglon — On work that has heen 
done. 

Alderman Power — Talk about conducting the 
sewage to the channel. Are you aware that the 
Harbor Commissioners won't permit it? There 
was no talk about indicting the city for main- 
taining a nuisa nee till this question of a park was 
forced in. The Board of Health have done all they 
could with their limited exoerience, and with in- 
creased experience it is reasonable to suppose 
they will improve. But the park has nothing to 
do with it, and is no remedy for the evil. When 
this authority is obtained, the representatives of 
the $70,000,000 worth of land will bring a pressure 
to bear from all quarters, and the carrying of 
measures often depends upon the influence 
brought to bear upon tnem. The influence of 
land speculators must have been great to get the 
city indicted. 

Alderman Worthington — Does the gentleman 
include the Board of Health among the land spec- 
ulators ? 

Alderman Power— I am speaking of land specu- 
lators. The Board of Health are supposed to be 
in the employ of the city. 

Alderman Worthington— Did they not testify 
that there was a nuisance on the Back 8ay? 

Alderman Power— I have heard they did. But 
there is no reason for a park here. Our suburbs 
are an elegant park. If we need to spend money 
for drainage we can do it without laying out a 
park. We could build a sewer across the citv and 
empty it into Long Island, but it would cost 
millions. • 

Alderman Prescott — I was much surprised to 
hear the Alderman from Ward 12 trying to refute 
the statements made in the report of the Park 
Commission, saying they were not true, and that 



FEBRUARY 18 



1875 



75 



in some particulars the statistics were not correct. 
Appended to the report I find the following: 

"The undersigned, while assenting in general 
terms to the statements contamedin the foregoing 
report, desires to have it appear as a part of the 
record that be is opposed to any measures which 
will involve an expenditure of money for the pur- 
pose of laying out public parks at this time, the 
city being heavily in debt, the taxes for municipal 
purposes very high, and all kinds of business in an 
unusually depiessed condition. 

James Power." 

It seems that he did assent in general terms to 
the statements in the report. 

Alderman Power — I explained that before. 
What I meant by assenting in general terms was 
that I assented to the statements in relation to 
the advantages of a park; but I dissented from 
Dr. Clarke's sanitary statistics. 

Alderman Prescott— One other thing. The Al- 
derman has represented this as a scheme of land 
speculators, and that it was. land speculators who 
appeared before this commission. Does the gen- 
tleman mean to Say that the commissioners ac- 
ceded to the desire of the land speculators. Now, 
who are these commissioners? His Honor, the 
Mayor of Boston — is there a gentleman who has 
been associated with him that believes he could 
be made the tool of land speculators? The 
honorable Chairman of this Board, who is 
seated here for the fourth time — do gentle- 
men believe he could be marie the tool of 
land speculators? Three members of the 
Common Council, one now its honored presi- 
dent, sat upon this commission and unanimously 
indorse its recommendations— Mr. Richard Froth- 
ingham, whom the city invited to deliver the ora- 
tion last Fourth of July, one of the most honored 
citizens of this city; Dr. E.H.Clarke, who has 
given the subject of sanitary science almost ex- 
clusive study for years ; WilliamGray, Jr. ;— have 
these gentlemen listened to the land speculators 
and had the wool pulled over their eyes and 
made the report they did? If that be so, I 
should think this order ought not to pass, 
for if they have had the wool pulled over 
their eyes, this Board may run the same risk. I 
believe with the gentleman from Ward 14, that 
we are not advocating this measure simply be- 
cause it will give us improved drainage. It is the 
whole matter of a series of public parks, or one 
large one, which will improve the surrounding 
territory and bring up the valuation of the city of 



Boston more than all the money we shall lay out. 
Ask the citizens of New York whether — notwith- 
standing their parks were laid out by such scoun- 
drels as Tweed and Sweeney and their crew— they 
would wipe them out and have it as it was in 
the past. How is it with Brooklyn, Philadelphia 
and Baltimore? I put that question to a gen- 
tleman from Philadelphia this afterno5n, and he 
• said that of all the improvements made by the 
public monej he believed it was the deliberate 
judgment of the taxpayers there that the park 
was the best investment the citj had ever made. 
The figures in this report are sufficient to con- 
vince me that Boston ought to take this step now, 
when real estate is depressed, and property can 
De bought at a comparatively low figure. 
I have never known a public improvement, even a 
street widening or extension, to be discussed m 
this Board or before committees, but what inter 
ested parties appeared. Take the extension of 
Swett street, involving an expenditure of nearly 
half a million dollars — which was urged so strenu- 
ously by the Alderman from Ward 12— who were 
more frequently seen at the committee meetings 
on that matter than the parties whose lands on 
the South Bay will be improved by the exten- 
sion? So it is with all great improvements. 
They must benefit some people. The question 
in this case ; s, will the expenditure be warranted 
by the benefit it will confer on the whole people? 
I believe it will. I cannot understand how any 
one can object to the order with the restrictions 
placed upon it by the amendment offered by the 
Chairman. 

Aldeiman Stebbins — 1 desire to offer the follow- 
ing amendment, to be inserted before the one 
adopted: 

"Provided, however, that no expense shall be 
authorized for the purchase or impiovement of 
anv land exceeding in amount the sum raised by 
taxation by the City Council for that purpose, and 
all money actually received by the city for better- 
ment assessed upon the adjoining land." 

The amendment was advocated by Aldermen 
htebbins and Burrage and adopted — yeas 10, nays 
2— Aldermen Quincy and Worthington voting nay. 

The order as amended was rejected— yeas 6, 
na.vs 6. 

Yeas— Aldermen Bigelow, Clark, O'Brien, Pres- 
cott, Quincy, Worthington— 6. 

Nays— Aldermen Burrage, Harris, Pope, Power, 
Stebbins, Viles— 6. 

On motion of Alderman Harris the Boaid ad- 
journed to Tuesday next, 23d inst., at 4 P.M. 



76 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

FEBRUARY 18, 1875. 



Regular weekly meeting at half-past seven 
o'clock P. M., Halsey J. Boardmaii, President, in 
the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN 
FOR CONCURRENCE. 

Annual reports of SuDerintendents of Streets 
and Printing. Placed on file. 

Petitions of S. T. Hyde, P. M. Kellaher, Henry 
McDonald, Charles McOuinness, Company K, 
First Infantry, First Company of Cadets,' aod 
John H. Wright et al., and request of Overseers 
of Poor. Severally referred. 

Report no action necessarv o:i petition of the 
School Committee to be furnished with the 
Municipal Register, as tfip Committee on Printing 
will direct the supply of the same. Accepted. 

Report and order to pay the salary of the late 
City Treasurer, up to July 1, 1875, to his widow. 
Order passed. 

Amendment to the order lequesting the Com- 
mittee on Ordinances to report an ordinance for 
the union of the Cochituale and Mystic water 
boards, by inserting "if deemed expedient. - ' 
Adopted, in concurrence 

Report and order requesting the Committee on 
Finance to report an order providing the means 
for completing the imptovement of the North- 
ampton-street district (City Doc. No. 25), and or- 
der for assessing cost of making said inaprove- 
provement. Orders passed. 

Order placing the salary of the Fourth Assistant 
Solicitor at $2500 per annum, beginning at the 
date of his appointment. Passed to a second 
reading. 

The salary bill (City Document No. 22) was re- 
ceived and laid over. 

Report nominating Second Assistant Assessors 
and certificate of election of said as-essors by the 
Board of Aldermen. Report accepted and nomi- 
nations laid over. Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 said he 
noticed the name of Benjamin Callender on one 
of the tickets; it was there without that gentle- 
man's knowledge and consent, he was not a candi- 
date, and would not accept the office if elected. 

Order to allow Glover & Jones to erect awoodtn 
building on a wharf in rear of Commercial street, 
Ward 16. Read twice and passed. 

Executive communication transmitting invita- 
tions to attend centennial celebration at Concord 
and Lexington, with resolve accepting the same 
and providing for a committee to attend the cele- 
bration. Resolve passed. 

Order that the expense of making a phono- 
graphic report of the inquest on the fire at 145 
Court street, amounting to $255, be allowed and 
paid from the appropriation for the Fire Depart- 
ment. 

Pas-ed to a second reading. 

Order that the Committee on the Fire Depart- 
ment be requested to consider the expediency of 
establishing the office of E'ire Mars rial, and to 
report whether any additional legislation i? neces- 
sary to enable the City Council to appoint such an 
officer with power to investigate the origin and 
cause of fires. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5—1 have no objection to 
this matter's going to the Committee on Fire De- 
partment, but I would like to have somebody give 
a reason why such an officer is needed. If it is 
for the purpose of taking away from the present 
commissioners a part of the responsibilities and 
duties to perform which we pay twelve or 
fifteen thousand dollars per annum, for the 
purpose of creating a new office, let it be 
understood. I shall object to taking away 
any of the powers and responsibilities of the 
Fire Commissioners. It would appear— I have 
some knowledge on the subject, having been upon 
the committee which established that commission 
— that that was a duty for which they are paid, as 
that matter was considered in fixing the amount 
of their salaries, and it was understood that they 
were to examine into all such matters. I bave yet 
io hear any reason for this entirely new matter; I 
have yet, ti hear any reeson*for the appointment 
of an additional officer. We have three gen- 
tlemen who sit in their seats in their offices with 
closed doors, or did so last year for a con- 



siderable time— I will not repeat the words, 
because I called attention to it last year 
two or three times. They are expected to 
consider everything connected with fires, and now 
comes a proposition to appoint an additional offi- 
cer. No reasons have been given for it, but I will 
now raise mj voice in objection to any such ap- 
pointment, because it seems to me that these 
three gentlemen have an abundance of time to 
consider all matters in connection with the cause 
of fires. I want to throw all the responsibil- 
ity connected with the examination of causes 
of fires upon those three commissioners. I 
was first and foremost, year before last, 
in proposing to the City Council to ap- 
point a committee to investigate this subject, 
and the reorganization of the department, 
the result of which was the passage of an ordi- 
nance for the appointment of that honorable 
board. Now I undertake to say that they are not 
half occuoier); not half their time is legitimately 
occupied with matters connected with the Fire 
Department. If I am wrong, sir, the honorable 
Committee on Fire Department wiT. place me 
right. I frequently pass their door, at noon, early 
in the morning and in the evening, and I find 
them without occupation; and yet, sir, here it is 
proposed to create the office of Fire Marshal, with 
a salary of $3008 or $4000 a year, I suppose, to come 
out of the treasury. I am opposedto the crea- 
tion of such an office, and I am opposed to the 
crea'ion of any such commissions unless they 
throw open their doors, unless every official act of 
theirs shall be susceptible of investigation by this 
City Council. They pass upon appropriations in 
detail without a voice from us. I am opposed to 
the exercise of any such arbitrary authority by any 
commission. I think the City Co'incil, coming as 
it does from the people every year, is the proper 
body to pass upon every appropriation and fix 
the salaries for the officers and employes of the 
city. I find, sir, that this honorable commission 
last year — I don't know how it may be this year — 
Mr. Jaquss of Ward 9 — I rise to a point of order. 
The remarks of the genLleman are not germane 
to the question. 

The President— The Chair decides the point 
well taken. The question is on the expediency of 
the reference. 

Mr, Shaw of Ward 5— I am touching the whole 
point at issue, and I shall always give my reasons 
for the faith that is within me, according to par- 
liamentary custom. I believe that there should 
not be a Fire Marshal, ar d I think the reasons I 
gave are entirely germane to the question not- 
withstanding my worthy — 

The President — The question is upon instruct- 
ing the committee to investigate whether such an 
appointment should be made. 

Mr. Shaw — I understand that, sir, but I am 
simply giving my reason why this committee 
should not investigate. 

The President— The gentleman has a right to do 
that, but the question of appointing the Marshal 
is not under discussion. 

Mr. Shaw— I admit it, sir, but we are not here to 
be confined exclusively in every word we say to 
the simple point under discussion without illus- 
tration. 

The President— The gentleman will confine him- 
self to the question of reference. 

Mr. Shaw— We are not compelled to be confined 
exclusively to the order. If the Council see tit to 
refer the matter, I shall offer no objection. 

Mr. Howes of Ward 11— If the gentleman had 
waited for the committee to report, he might then 
have heard their explanations, but in his state- 
ment in regard to the Fire Commissioners he errs 
very greatly. There are no powers vested in the 
commission to investigate the causes of fires. 
The only power by which it can be done 
is bv a fire inquest, one of which has recently 
taken place, and the order to pa" for the clerical 
assistance has just passed its first reading. The 
office which the committee ask for power to inves- 
tigate the expediency of creating is somewhat sim- 
ilar to that now in existence in New York city, by 
which the origin of fires can be looked into and 
evidence taken on the spot. The Fire Commis- 
sioners have no such power now. If they wish to 
look into the cause of a fire supposed to be incen- 
diary they have to make a complaint to the Mu- 
nicipal Court, summon jurors and have the par- 
ties brought before them. 

The power asked for by the commit+ee is to 
create an officer who can, if he thinks it neces- 
sary, summon witnesses and take evidence on 
the' spot, under oath. The matter is very imma- 



FEBRUARY 18 



1875 



77 



ture at present, and the committee wish to have 
this order passed to further them in their investi- 
gations. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5— I only rise to answer a 
suggestion of my worthy friend. I have no doubt 
he i ; right and honest in it. But i would suggest 
that the matter be simplified by empowering the 
Fire Commissioners to do it. It can be done by 
ordinance or by an appeal to the big house upon 
the hill. Simplify the matter. 

The order was passed. 

Order for the Mayor to petition the Legislature 
to change the mode of assessing cost of construct- 
ing sewers. Passed. 

BADGES. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 7, the Council 
took up the special assignment for eight o'clock, 
P. M., viz., motion to reconsider the vote whereby 
was rejected the order for the appointment of a 
special committee to procure badges for such 
members of the Common Council as desire them, 
at a cost not to exceed $15 for each badge. 

Mr. Flynn — I hope the motion to reconsider will 
prevail. If it does I shall move to further amend 
by striking out "$15" and inserting "$7.50." 

Mr. Willcutt of Ward 17— As an honest differ- 
ence appears to exist in regard to this matter, I 
propose to vote for a reconsideration, and if it 
is carried T shall move an Oder providing that 
the City Messenger be authorized to supply all 
members with badges who desire them, at their 
own expense. 

On motion of Mr. Burditt of Ward 16, the yeas 
and nays were ordered on the reconsideration, 
and it was carried— yeas 39, nays 32 : 

Yeas — Messrs. Anderson, Barry, Bent, Brackett, 
Clark, Collins, Coyle, Cushman, Damon, Day, Dev- 
ereux, Duggan, Edwards, Fitzpatrick, Flynn, 
Harrigan,Hicks,Kelley, Kingsbury, Kiagsley, Lap- 
pen, Leighton, Moley, Mooney, Murray, Noyes, 
Osborne, Power, Rice, Shaw, Sibley, Train, Wal- 
bridge, Walsh, Whitcomb, Whitinore, Wilbur, 
Willcutt, Woods— 39. 

Nays— Messrs. Beal, Burditt, Burgess, Cawley, 
Crocker, Curtis, Cushing, Fitzgerald, Goldthwait, 
Guild, Harmon, Hiscock, Howes, Jaques, Kim ball, 
Long, Lormg, Morrison, Newton, Page, Parker, 
Peabody, Pierce, Sampson, Smith, Spr ague, Sta- 
cy, Sweetser, Thacher, Trull, Wadsworth, Wilson 
-32. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 moved to amend the or- 
der by striking out "$15," and inserting in place 
thereof "$7.50," 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6 called for the yeas and 
nays. 

Mr. Train of Ward 13—1 hope no more time will 
be taken in arguing pro and con upon this ques- 
tion. As has been said, there is an honest differ- 
ence of opinion in regard to the propriety of hav- 
ing badges, and as the matter stands with the 
amsdndmtnt of $7.50, which will procure a very 
proper badge for those who desire them, it seems 
to me that if those who voted against this reconsid- 
eration will stand to their opinion, there will only 
be a small amount of money laid out for badges. 
If one-half of the Council desire badges — it has 
been the custom for many years — I think it is no 
more than fair to let them have this trifle. 

The yeas and nays were ordered on the amend- 
ment. 

Mr. Jaques of Ward 9—1 hope the amendment 
will not pievail, for the simple reason that this 
has, in one sense, been made a test question 
as to whether this bocy will spend any money 
ujjon a tiling that has been clearly shown 
to be improper. The action of those who 
would have these amendments prevail re- 
minds me of the young woman who had been 
unfortunate enough to become a mother before 
she was a wife, and she excused herself on the 
ground that it was a very small one. Now it 
seems to me that the question in regard to this 
bantling is its origin,*and I should have the same 
objection to voting for an amendment of fifty 
cents that I should to voting for one of $7.50. 

Mr. Page of Ward 9 — I do n^t think ary amount 
of discussion would chauge our minds on chis sub- 
ject and I move the pievious question. 

Mr. Fitzgerald of Ward 7--The previous ques- 
tion will cut off all amendments to the order, and 
as I proposed to offer one I hope the gentleman 
will withdraw the motion. 1 am sure that dis- 
cussion will not change members' minds. If a 
strong public opinion against it has not changed 
the members' minds, I don't think discussion will. 
But I hope members will have the opportunity to 
offer amendments. 



Mr. Page of Ward 9 — I fail to see the advantage 
of offering amendments except to take up time. 
We have taken tip enough time discussing amend- 
ments and orders on the subject, and if members 
want to put in orders they can defeat this one. It 
seems to me that the general question has been 
discussed sufficiently. 

Mr. Willcutt of Ward 17— The gentleman from 
Ward 9 intended no reflection upon me, I presume. 
I have endeavored to catch the eye of the Presi- 
dent several times, but failed until now. I have 
an order which I would like to offer. 

The mam question was ordered, and the amend- 
ment as offered by Mr. Flynn was adopted— ^19 
yeas, 22 nays : 

Yeas — Anderson, Barry, Bent, Brackett, Burditt, 
Clarke, Collins, Coyle, Crockei, Cushing, Cush- 
man, Damon, Day, 'Devereux, Duggan, Edwards, 
Fitzpatrick, Flynn, Goldthwait, Harmon, Harri- 
gan, Hicks, Kelley, Kingsbury, Kint-sley, Lappen, 
Leighton, Long, Loring, Moley, Mooney, Murray, 
Noyes, O borne, Peabody, Power, Rice, Shaw, 
Sibley, Sprague, Train, Wadsworth, Walrridge, 
Walsh, Whitcomb, Whitmore, Wilbur, Wilson, 
Woods— 49. 

Kays— Beal , Burgets, Cawley, Curtis, Fitzgerald, 
Guild, Hiscock, Howes, Jaques, Kimball, Morri- 
son, Newton, Page, Parker, Pierce, Sampson, 
Smith, Stacey, Sweetser, Thacher, Trull, Willcutt 
—22. 

On motion of Mr. Kimball of Ward 6, the yeas 
and nays were ordered on the passage of the or- 
der, and it was passed as amended— yeas 38, nays 
33. 

Yeas— Anderson, Barry, Bent, Clarke, Collins, 
Coyle, Cushman, Damon, Day. Devereux, Dug- 
gan, Edwards, Fitzpatrick, Flynn, Harmon, Har- 
rigan, Hicks, Kelley, Kingsbury, Kingsley, Lap- 
pen, Leighton, Moley, Mooney, Murray, Noyes, 
Osborne, Power, Uice, Shaw, Sibley, Train, Wal- 
bridge, Walsh, Whitcomb, Whitmore, Wilbur. 
Woods— 3& 

Nays— Beal, Brackett, Burditt, Burgess, Cawley, 
Crocker, Curds, Cushing, Fitzgerald, Goldthwait, 
Guild, Hiscock, Howes, Jaques, Kimball, Long, 
Loring, Morrison, Newton, Page, Parker, Pea- 
body, Pierce, Sampson, Smith, Sprague, Stacey, 
Sweetser, Thacher, Trull, Wadsworth, Willcut, 
Wilson -33. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7— In order to settle this 
matter tonight, I move a reconsideration of the 
last vote, hoping it will not prevail. 

Mr. Wilson of Ward 12—1 raise the point of or- 
der, that chis matter having beenjsettled on a re- 
consideration, it cannot be reconsidered again, 
and the motion is out of order. 

The President decided that the point was not 
well taken. 

Mr. Page of Ward 9—1 rise to a point of oi der. 
The morion to reconsider cannot be made at this 
time, as the rules provide the order in which busi- 
ness shall be transacted, and the motion is not in 
order till later in the evening, under the head of 
"Motions, orders and resolutions." 

The President— In strict conformity to the rule, 
the point is well taken ana the motion is not in 
order. 

Mr. Flynn — Has it not been the custom? 

The President— It has, but uuder the strict rules 
it is not in order. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 — Cannot a member move a 
reconsideration at the same meeting? 

The President; — The Chair decides that he can. 

Mr. Shaw— Then the gentleman's motion must 
be iu order. 

The President— The Council have adopted cer- 
tain rules for the government of business. The 
motion would properly be in order under "Mo- 
tions, orders and resolutions." 

Mr. Flynn— I can see that the opponents of the 
measure are determined to defeat it, and in order 
that we may settle it now, I move a suspension of 
the rule that I may make the motion to reconsider 
at this time. 

Mr. Wilson of Ward 12 — I did not raise the point 
I suggested from any unfriendliness to the gen- 
tlemau from Ward 7, but out of sheer consist- 
ency. I c)o not see that we could gain anything 
by suspending the rule. We have once reconsid- 
ered this question and cannot reconsider it again. 
It has now been decided. I have voted against 
the order and the amendments. But it is decided 
and I am content. I differ with the gentleman 
from Ward 7 honestly, but I do not think that at 
this stage of the proceedings it is worth while to 
spend time on a reconsideration, as we have spent 
time enough already, and the matter is settled 
beyond reservation. I hope it will be dropped. 



V 



f 



tf 



78 



COMMON COUNCIL 



Mr. Page of Ward 9— The gentleman from Ward 
7 entirely misconstrued my motive. I have no in- 
tention to fiilibur.ter on this question, but I do de- 
sire that the business may be despatched. Several 
important matters are to be transacted and noth- 
ing done to detain those who wish to leave. 

Mr. Flynn— I don't know what the motives of 
the gentleman from Ward 9 are, but I know from 
experience that he has made such a motion at 
least ten times, and my object was to prevent de- 
lay. If the' gentlemen are satisfied I will with- 
draw the motion. 

Mr. Wilson — I should be willing to vote against 
a reconsideration if it comes up by a trick. 

The motion to suspend the rule was withdrawn. 

The President appointed Messrs. Anderson of 
Ward 3, dishing of Ward 4, and Harmon of, Ward 
6 the committee to procure badges. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order to pav the interest due on the Pierce Fuel 
Fund from Sept. 1. 1872 to Sept. 1, 1873, amount- 
ing to $90. Passed in concurrence. 

Order to issue to John Gilson a certificate of in- 
debtedness for $4000, on the conditions set forth 
in said ordei . Pass ed in concurrence. 

Oi der for a tran-fer from the appropriation for 
Police Station House, South Boston, to thac for 
Police Station House, Ward 16, of the sum of 
$2000. Passed in concurrence — yeas 61, nays 0. 

ADDITIONAL WATER SUPPLY. 

On motion of Mr. Sweetser of Ward 10 the Coun- 
cil took up the special assignment for S L / 2 o'clock 
P. M., viz., orders appropriating $1,500,000 for 
extension of the Cochituate Water Works and 
granting; authority for said extension, and $30,000 
for a siphon pipe over Charles River. (Reprinted 
City Doc. No. 20, with amendments of the Board 
of Aldermen thereto.) 

The oiders were passe 1 in concurrence— yeas 57, 
nays 14 : 

Yeas — Anderson, Barry, Beal, Bent, Brackett, 
Burditt, Cawley, Clarke, Collins, Coyle, Crocker, 
Curtip, Cushing, Damon, Duggan, Edwards, Fitz- 
gerald, Fitzpatrsck, Flynn, Goldthwait, Guild, 
Harmon, Hiscoek, Howes, Jaques, Kimball, 
Kingsbury, Kingsley, Lappen, Long, Lormg, 
Mooney, Morrison, Murray, Newton, Noyes, Os- 
borne," Page, Parker, Peabody, Pierce, Por/er, 
Rice, Sampson, Shaw, 'Smith, Sprague, Sweet- 
ser, Thacher, Train, Wadsworth,. Walsh, Whit- 
comb, Whitmore, Wilbur, Willcutt, Woods— 57. 

Nays— Burgess, Cushman, Day, Devereux, Har- 
rigan, Hicks, Kelley, Leighton, Moley, Sibley, 
Stacey, Trull, Walbridge, Wdson— 14. 

SWETT STREET. 

The order for a loan of $476,000, for widening, 
building and extending Swett street from Albany 
street to Dorchester avenue, and the order for con- 
tracts for the construction of Swett street from Al- 
bany street to Dorchester avenue, including the 
necessary bridges over tide waters; and also for 
raising the road beds and tracks of the Boston, 
Hartford & Erie Railroad, an constructing a 
bridge over said street, were considered among 
the unfinished business. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 15 moved that tliey be laid 
on the table. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 — This is an important mat- 
ter and should be attended to as soon as possible. 
I would like the gentleman to state his reasons. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 15— This afternoon I listen- 
ed to the arguments of the gentleman from Ward 
12 [Alderman Power] in the Board of Aldermen in 
favor of economy. 1 was very much pleased with 
them , and I think that before we enter into a mat- 
ter of this kind we should always give it due and 
proper deliberation. I know this subject received 
considerable attention in the last City Council, 
but I think that as there are many new members 
here ihey should hear some good reasons why this 
order should pass at the present time. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7— The reasons are that the 
last City Council laid out this street a-< a public 
highway between Roxbury and South Boston. 
The land was taken at that time, but it being so 
late it) the season the Council concluded that the 
order for borrowing the money should go to the 
Finance Committee of tbis Government. J The or- 
der for taking the land and laying out the streat 
was passed by that Council. The city's honor is 
at stake in this matter. Now all that we have got 
to do in this matter is to go on and build the 

Mr. Train of Ward 13— As 1 was an advocate of 
this matter in the last City Government, I would 
reiterate what I said theu. The ainouut of money, 



$476,000, seems a large sum ; but it is merely to 
cover che gross expense of this improvement. 
The drawback which will come to the city from 
the abutters — which those parties have already 
signed bonds to pay— amounts to between $90,000 
and 100,000, which will make the cost not far from 
$376,000, instead of $476,000. I spoke to City Au- 
ditor Turner on the subject, and he said that of 
course we must pay the fills before we can chaige 
betterments for the improvements. As to the im- 
portance of carrying tnat project through, I have 
yet to hear one speak against itoutside of the City 
Council. On the contrary, I have heard hundreds 
say it was one of the most important and best 
schemes we acted upon last year. 

Mr Page of Ward 9— I had the honor to present 
a minority leport from the Committee on Streets, 
last year, on this subject, and although whatever 
this Council may do tonight caanot effect the 
merits of the question or prevent the laying out 
of the street, I have not changed my mind. I en- 
deavored to give this City Council the opportunity 
to vote upon che merits of the question, and sev- 
eral gentlemen supported me,buc we foimeda 
very small minority. A majority of the two 
branches of that" City Government decided 
to lay out that street and that this 
City Council should furnish the money, 
which we are obliged to do, or the citv will be 
liable. The state of the matter is just "this : The 
Street Commissioners passed an order that the 
safety and convenience of the public required the 
laying out of the street, which was sent to the 
City Couno-il of last year, and they referred it to 
the Joint Committee on Streets. After a great 
deal of figuring the abutters consented to pay a 
very small amount of what they snouJd have paid. 
There is no question about that at all, as it is a» 
improvement very largely for the benefit of the 
abutters, arid they pay only a very small part of the 
cost of the improvement. The parties who own the 
land there are of course immediately interested, 
and they should pay considerably more money 
than they agreed to. In regard to gentlemen out- 
side of the Council being unanimously in favor of 
it, I beg to differ from the gentleman ; for I have 
seen many who have taken my side of the case, 
and who think that, if the street is laid out, it 
should be paid for by those who are to have the 
benefit of it. But, as the matter stands today, 
the City Council have concurred with the Street 
Commissioners in the passage of the order; but if 
the land is not taken in two years the taking fails, 
though parties could sue the city for damages for 
not taking the land. If the Council refuses to ap- 
propriate the money for it, the consequence would 
be tbat the city would be involved in lawsuits. I 
was sorry I could not get the matter referred to 
this Government, who have to furnish the money, 
and it did not seem to rne that we should be placed 
in the position we are in today. But, as the City 
Council has concurred with the Street Commis- 
sioners in passing the order laying out. the street, 
I do not know any way to get" out ot the dilemma 
but to furnish the money. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7— Another fact is that the 
abutters have given bonds to pay $60,000 towards 
building the street, and $40,000 worth of land. 
The city his releases of the land and bonds that 
the parties will pay the $60,000 when the street is 
laid out. 

Mr. Train of Ward 13 — I think it fair to state 
one other fact, and that is in regard to the refer- 
ence of this matter to this City Government, 
which was fully explained then. This matter bad 
been thoroughly ventilated f r two years and the 
reason urged for the settlement ot the question 
before the conclusion of the last City Council was 
that the releases had been obtained. It was on 
that ground that action was taken last year. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 15— This matter ought to be 
tabled until we can see in what condition we shall 
be in a few months hence. It has been argued be- 
foie the upper house that it is necessary for us to 
have great economy at the present time, and from 
what I have been able to learn on this subject— 
I have read the reports of last year— it 
looks to me like a very wild scheme. I 
don't think the committee reported that 
public necessity requires this avenue to be 
laid out ; it was rather for the purpose of bringing 
lands into the market that it was thought to be 
advisable, It does not appear that pubilc travel 
requires that this street should be laid out at the 
present time. 

The President said the . time for debate 
had expired, and after the expression of 
a desire, by Mr. Page, that the new members 



FEBRUARY 18, 1875 



79 



should liave an opportunity 10 look into the 
merits of the case, anil an explanation from 
Mr. Flynn that the city is liable for damages if the 
street is not built and that the work can be done 
cheaper now by $1 or $1.50 per square yard than 
it can two or three months hence, and the com- 
mittee desire to press the work forward, the order 
to contract was laid on the table, and the order 
for the loan was specially assigned to the next 
meeting at 8 P. M. 

ELECTIONS. 

The following elections occurred: 
Member of Cochituate Water Board. Certifi- 
cate of the election of Uriel H. Ciocker as a mem- 
ber of the Cochituate Water Board, in place of 
Amos L. Noyes, chosen by this Council. Messrs. 
Wilson of Ward 12, and Harrigau of Ward 14, 
Long of Ward 8, were oppointed a committee t© 
receive, sort and count votes. They reported- 
Whole number of votes 63 

Necessary to a choice 63 

Amos L. N oyes 40 

Uriel H. Crocker 21 

H. H. Sprague 2 

And Mr. Noyes was elected in non-concurrence. 
Certificate sent up. 

City Registrar. Report ncminating N. A. 
Apollonio accepted. Messrs. Pierce of Ward 11, 
Sampson of Ward 10, aad Clarke of Ward 15 were 
appointed a committee to collect and count votes. 
They reported — 

Whole number of votes 61 

Necessary to a choice 32 

N. A. Apollonio had 58 

Edward Kelly 1 

Charles Harris 1 

Edwin Sibley 1 

And Mr. Apollonio was declared elected. Certifi- 
cate seat up. 

Superintendents of Bridges. Messrs. Whitmore 
of Ward 4, rower of Ward 21 , and Newton of Ward 
14 were the committee to collect and count votes. 
Mr. Parker of Ward 14 inquired who Mr. Fiancis 
M. Hughes (the minority nominee lor superintend- 
ent of Dover-.«tieet bridge) was, and Mr. Fljnn of 
Ward 7 said he supposed Mr. Hughes was nom- 
inated because ihe minority of the committee 
thought there ought to be a Changs. The great 
majority of the South Boston people think the 
present superintendent [Mr. Nelson] is not a fit 
man to have there ; he is a person whom the citi- 
zens of Wards 7 and 12 do not think mueh of and 
some of chem cannot get alonsr with him. 
The Committee reported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 67 

Necessary to a choice 34 

For Superintendent of Federal-street Bridge. 

Jacob Norris 67 

For Superintendent of Dover-street Bridge. 

Angus Nelson 33 

Francis M. Hughes 34 

For Superintendent of Chelsea-street Bridge. 

Edwai d T. Stowers 67 

For Superintendent of Charles Biver Bridge. 

Joel B. Bolan 67 

For Superintendent of Warren Bridge. 

Charles H. Marple 67 

For Superintendent of Maiden Bridge. 

John Ho ward 67 

For Superintendent of Broadway Bridge. 

John C. Boole 67 

For Superintendent of Mt. Washington-avenue Bridge. 

George H. Davis 67 

For Superintendent of Meridian-street Bridge. 

Beuben B. Wendell 67 

And those receiving the necessary votes were 
declaied elected. 
Certificate sent up. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

By Mr. Anderson of Ward 3— Petition of Wil- 
liam Wilson for compensation for damages to his 
wife caused by a fall on sidewalk. 

By Mr. Thacher of Ward 15— Petition of E. D. 
Wlvitcomb for compensation for damages to his 
sleigh by an alleged defect in a public street. 

Severally referred to the Joint Committee on 
Claims and sent up. 

REPORTS. 

Mr. Page of Ward 9 submitted a report from 
the Joint Committee on Public Instruction that 
it is inexpedient to purchase the vacant lot ad- 
joining th° Chapman Schoolhouse, as the land 
cannot be procured on satisfactory terms. Ac- 
cepted and sent up. 

Mr. Day of Ward 1 .submitted a report from the 
Joint Committee on the Ferries that it is inexpe- 
dient to make any reduction in the rates of toll at 
this time. Accepted and sent up. 



Mr. Sprague of Waid 4 submitted a r -port from 
the Committee on the Public Library, that the 
order to print the proceenings at dedication of 
Brighton Branch Library ought not to pass. Ac- 
cepted, and sent up, 

REDIVISION OE THE WARDS. 

On motion of Mr. Whitmore, the order for the 
Mayor to amend tne petition tor a new number of 
wards, to provide that each ward shall elect two 
members of the Common Council and tv/o mem- 
bers of the School Committee, was caken from the 
table. The question was on its passage. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 4—1 desire to amend 
that order by placing the number of wards at 
thnty-six. This order is in reality v report of the 
Committee on the Census and Division of the 
Wards. They first reported through tneir chair- 
man to the Board of Aldermeu an order which not 
only requested the Mayor to petition for a change 
in the number of wards, but alsom regard to the 
number of Common Councilmen and School Com- 
mitteemen from each ward. The Aldermen 
passed that order with the clause relat- 
ing to representation in the Council stricken 
out; it was sent down here, and passed, and 
the Major has placed the petition before the 
Legislature. That petition is for liberty to make 
the number of wards not exceeding thirty, and it 
is absolutely essential for us to take some action 
in regard to representation. As the charter now 
stands we are obliged to have four members of 
the Council and School Committee from each 
ward, except Wards 17, 19, 20. 21 and 22; if there is 
to be any change we must have an amend- 
ment to tbe charter, or else have only 
eighteen wards. The matter is one upon which 
the committee express no opinion as to whether 
it is advisable to limit the number of representa- 
tives, but it is desirable that some action be 
taken or else we shall be limited to eighteen 
wards. In the committee it was deemed best to 
limit the number of Councilmen and School Com- 
mitteemen to two from each ward and fix the 
number of wards at thirty-six. At all events, the 
petition should be amended. This matter of 
representatives was sent to us from the 
Board of Aldermen in the form it was 
for tbe reason that it was very strongly 
the feeling of that Board that the initiative 
should be taken by us. For one, I feel undecided 
as to the advisability of having smaller wards ; 
but it is proper for the Council to decide whether 
it will reduce the number of members from each 
ward. As the charter stands now, nearly all the 
wards must have four members, and without in- 
creasing the Councilmen we could only have 
eighteen wards. It is rather late to commence 
discussion this evening,, and if it is the desire f 
the Council I have ho objection to a special as- 
signment of the order for nexc Thnrsdav evening. 
The Mayor must fix the number of 
wards in the petition. We now have sixteen 
wards entitled t^ four members and seven enti- 
tled to two, and the question is whether we shall 
increase the number of the Council for tbe next 
ten years or keep it at the present limit. 

Mr. Fitzgerald of Ward 7—1 think that if we pass 
this order it will be anticipating the report of the 
committee on the new charter. There may per- 
haps be a necessity for passing the first portion 
of the order to fix the number of wards at not ex- 
ceeding thirty-six. if that is deemed expedient; but 
I think it would be rather forcing the matter to 
dehate the question whether we shall have two. 
tfciee or four Common Councilmen or members of 
the school board. Tbe rights of the city in the 
Legislature have been saved by the introduction, 
by Mr. Codman of Ward 6, of an order under 
which we can bring before the JudiciaryCommittee 
any amendment to the city charter which we think 
proper. I should not be willing to discuss the 
question of representation now. We all agree 
that there should be some reduction of the school 
board, but I don't think members are prepared to 
vote tonight. No harm will be done if this is laid 
over one week, audit' it waits till tbe report on 
the new charter is made we will be able to discuss 
it more intelligently and come to some conclusion. 
I think the true way is to petition the Legislature 
for authority to divide the city into such a num- 
ber of wards, not exceeding thirty or thirty-six. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward «— I cannot quite agree 
with the gentleman who has just sat down, that it 
is going to be safe for us to fix the number of 
wards and stop there, because if we do we must 
have, as it now stands, four times as many Com- 
mon Councilmen as we have now. We should de- 



80 



COMMON COUNCIL 



tennine now how many members of each branch 
we want in the Council, and rhe School Commit- 
tee. As has been said, it is necessary to have a re- 
division of the city, aud, as matters now stand, for 
the Council to act on rhe question of representation 
It is true that the city righis are preserved in the 
Legislature, and that the matter can be bi ought 
up at any time, and it appears to me that we 
should refer tbis order to the committee whom we 
appointed to consider tbe matter. When they re- 
port we shall have some definite opinron for our 
guidance, as they will report their rea sens for a 
smaller or larger number of wards. I hojje we shall 
refer the order instead of assigning it, and that 
they will report what in their opinion is the hest 
number of wards for the interest of the city. Then 
in determining the number of wards the Council 
would naturally decide bow many members we 
want from each body. While the committee on 
the new charter are doing all they can consistent- 
ly with their other engagements, and intend to 
make a full report at the earliest possible mo- 
ment, they have been ec gaged but two months up- 
on a work which it took the commissioners eighteen 
months to prepare, and I think it would not be 
wise to wait for their report. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 4 — I should have given 
a more extended explanation of this matter, but 
I supposed the members were aware of the pro- 
ceedings already had in the Board of Aldermen. 
This matter is brought torwaid as an amendment 
to the action already taken. They passed an or- 
der requesting the Mayor to petition the Legisla- 
ture to amend tbe charter so as to make a number 
of wards not exceeding thirty which might here- 
after be fixed by the City Council. That order 
passed this body and the petition has been sent to 
the Legislature. The result is we are oound 
to make some indication of the number of 
ware's we desire, as tbe Legislature will not 
allow us to fix it at "not exceeding 30," for if we 
do the remaining provisions of the charter will 
oblige us to have 120 members in this Council and 
180 members of the school Committee. That left 
us in such an absurd position that we should 
amend the petition so as to have only two or three 
Common Councilmen or School Committeemen. 
I should be glad to refer the order to the commit- 
tee if it would expedite matters. The only question 
is as to the desirability of increasing or diminish- 
ing the number of each body. If we have twen- 
ty-four ward«, we can have forty-eight or seventy- 
two members ; but we can have no intermediate 
number; and we should consider carefully 
whether or not we want to keeo the number at 
the present figure. We ought to say whether we 
want twenty wards with three members, or thirty 
with two. The other matter can be debated in a 
single evening. It is nothing whether you have 
two or three members from each ward, provided 
the total is the same. I can say in advance that the 



eommittee can only report twenty wards with three 
members, or thirty with two. I think it would be 
better to assign it to next Thursday evening. 

Mr. Bracketc of Ward 10— I hope the motion to 
refer will prevail. We are evidently not prepared 
to act upon it now. I think the Legislature will 
be in session two or three months, and, as has 
been said, an order has been introduced there 
which will save the rights of the city. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6—1 can no more agree 
with the gentleman from Ward 10 than I could 
with the gentleman from Ward 7. I think the 
Council had better not wait for the report on the 
new charter. This question must be determined, 
new charter or no new charter. Every member 
knows we must determine the number of wards, 
else it cannot be done again in ten years. For 
that reason, thinking it may advance this matter, 
I shall withdraw my notice for a reference, and 
shall move that it be specially assigned to the 
next meeting at half-past eight o'clock. 

The motion to assign prevailed. 

ICY SIDEWALKS. 

On motion of Mr. Crocker of Wsid 6, the ordi- 
nance to amend an ordinance relating to streets 
so as to require persons to keep the ice on the 
sidewalks covered with ashes was taken from the 
table, 

Mr. Crocker— This ordinance proposes to amend 
the order on page 640 of the Revised Ordinances, 
which provides that "Whenever sidewalks ad- 
joining any building or land are encumbered with 
ice, it shall be the duty of the owner or occupant 
to cause said sidewalks to be made safe and con- 
venient by removing the ice therefiom or 
covering the same by sand or ashes or some 
other suitable substance." It was found in 
practice that parties accepted the alternative of 
covering the ice on the sidewalks with sand or 
ashes, and that answered very well for a day or 
two ; but where ice remained for two or three 
weeks, after the first day or two the ashes or sand 
was blown off and the sidewalks would become 
worse than ever, and very dangerous, and the po- 
lice find they cannot; compel parties either to 
remove the ice or to put anything on it, 
after it has once been done. The parties con- 
tended that they had satisfied the ordinance by 
accepting the alternative of putting ashes upon it, 
and having dOtie that it was all the ordinance re- 
quired. The amendment requires parties to keep 
their sidewalks covered with ashes from time to 
time, and not leave them, as has been done, as 
many know to their cost, within the last month or 
so, uncovered, and the parties satisfying them- 
selves with merely putting ashes on once. 

The ordinance was passed and sent up. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 7, the Council 
adjourned. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



81 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceeding's of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY 23, 1875. 



Regular weekly meeting at four o'clock, Alder- 
man Clark, Chairman, presiding. 

JURORS DRAWN. 

Fourteen traverse juiors were drawn for the 
Municipal Court, South Boston District. 

STEAM ENGINES. 

Petitions to erect and use steam engines, by Bos- 
ton Gaslight Company, at corner of Snowhill and 
Hull streets, and H. F. Wheeler, at 71 Lincoln 
street, were considered on orders of notice for 
hearings to all parties objecting. No one appeared 
to object, and the petitions were referred to the 
Committee on Steam Engines. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Committee on Health, on the part of 
the Board. A. S. Lewis, M. D.,for leave to estab- 
lish a lying-in hospital at 110 Court street ; Thomas 
Cloonan, for leave to occupy a wooden stable for 
one horse on North Harvard street, "Ward 19. 

To the Joint Committee on Survey and Inspec- 
tion of Buildings. Fitchburg Railroad Company, 
for leave to erect a wooden building situated on 
their bridge over Charles River. 

To the\Committee on Licenses. John C. Stiles, 
for such a moaification of his omnibus route as 
will permit his coaches to pass out through "Wash- 
ington street. 

To the Joint Committee on Claims. William 
Bohrmann, for compensation for damage to his 
property on Lamartme street, Ward 17, by the 
Fire Department, Nov. 4 and 27, 1874, when his 
fence was broken down. 

EUen Charlton, to be paid for damages for per- 
sonal injuries from a fall on the ice on Ruggles 
street, Roxbury, Feb. 5. 

To the Joint Committee on Armories. B. F. 
Finan, Colonel of Ninth Regiment, M. V. M., for a 
regimental armory for his command. 

To the Committee on Sewers. Marie Hughes 
et al., for a sewer on Porter street, West Rox- 
bury. 

To the Committee on Paving. Benjamin F 
Brooks et al., trustees, for compensation for 
grade damages on Washington street. 

Joseph Comer, for compensation for grade dam- 
age on Washington street. 

George D.Welles, that Welles avenue and other 
streets in Ward 16 be put in order. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Orders to pay John Moore $2877.50, for land 
damages on Shawmut avenue ; to pay heirs of 
Dennis O'Brien $400, for Magazine-street land 
damages; to pay Herman W. Young $1259.25, for 
Shawm ut-avenue land damages. Severally passed. 

Order for Committee on County Buildings to 
provide the necessary furniture for the new Court 
House in Roxbury District, at a cost not exceed- 
ing $1500. Passed. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL FOR CON- 
CURRENCE. 

Petitions of William Wilson and E. D.Whitcomh. 
Severally referred. 

Report of Committee on Public Instruction that 
it is inexpedient to purchase additional land for 
the Chapman Sehoolnouse yard. Accepted. 

Report of Committee on Ferries that it is inex- 
pedient to reduce the East Boston Ferry tolls. Ac- 
cepted. 

Report of Committee on Public Library that the 
order to print the proceedings at dedication of 
Brighton Branch Library ought not to pass. Ac- 
cepted. 

Ordinance to amend the ordinance relating to 
streets so as to provide that icy sidewalks shall be 
kept covered with ashes or sand. Passed. 

ELECTIONS. 

The following elections occurred : 
Member of Cochituate Water Beard. Certifi- 
cate of election of Amos L. Noyes as a member of 
the Cochituate Water Board, in place of Uriel H. 
Crocker, chosen by this branch- 
Aldermen Viles and O'Brien were appointed a 
committee to collect and count votes. 

Aloerman Stebbins— I desire to state in behalf 
of the committee appointed to nominate candi- 



dates for msmbers of the Cochituate Water Board, 
that Mr. Crocker was nominated for the reason 
that members of that board expressed a desire 
that some gentleman connected 'with the legal 
profession might be selected as one of the mem- 
bers on the part of the City Council. That desire 
influenced the committee in their action. As gentle- 
men are aware, there are questions constantly com- 
ing before the Cochituate Water Board upon which 
they desire the opinion of some legal gentleman. 
It is not always convenient to senu to the City 
Solicitor' a office, even if it were desirable, and the 
question might be answered by a lawyer if one 
were connected with the board. The other branch 
having, by their oallots, repeatedly shown that 
they preferred some other member of that body 
to toe a member of the Cochituate Water Board, 
Mr. Crocker does not wish to stand in the way of 
what might be considered the wishes of the Com- 
mon Council, and desires that his name may be 
withdrawn. 
The toallot proceeded, with the following result: 

Whole number of votes 11 

Necessary for a choice B 

Uriel H.Crocker 2 

AmosL Noyes 9 

And Mr. Noyes was declared elected in concur- 
rence. 

City Registrar. Certificate of election of N. A. 
Apollonio,by the Common Council. Aldermen Big- 
elow and Burrage were the committee to collect 
and count votes. They reported that N. A. Apol- 
lonio had received 11 'votes, the whole number 
cast, and he was declared elected in concurrence. 
Superintendents of Bridges. Certificate of the 
election by the Common Council of the present 
incumbents, with the exception of Angus Nelson, 
Superintendent of the Dover-street bridge, in 
whose place Francis M. Hughes was chosen. 
Aldermen Pope and Worthingion were the com- 
mittee to collect and count votes. They reported- 
Whole number of votes 11 

Necessary to a choice 6 

For Superintendent of Federal-street Bridge, 

Jacob Norris 11 

For Superintendent of Dover-street Bridge, 

Angus N elson 10 

Francis M. Hughes 1 

For Superintendent of Chelsea-street Bridge, 

Edward T. Stowers 11 

For Superintendent of Charles RriverBridge, 

Joel R. Bolan 11 

For Superintendent of Warren Bridge , 

Charles H. Marple II 

For Superintendent of Maiden Bridge, 

John Howard 11 

For Superintendent of Broadway Bridge, 

John C. Poole 11 

For Superintendent of Mount Washington- 
avenue Bridge, 

George H. Davis 11 - 

For Superintendent of Meridian-street Bridge, 

Reuben B. Wendell 11 

And Angus Nelson was declared elected in non- 
concurrence, and the other superintendents were 
declared elected in concurrence. Certificate sent 
down. 

JAIL EXPENSES. 

A requisition for $1520.47, for expenses of Suf- 
folk County Jail for Febiuary, was received, and 
being duly certified, was ordered paid. 

BOND APPROVED. 

The bond of Charles S. Tasker, constable, being 
presented duly certified, was approved by the 
Board. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Bigelow, for the Committee on Li- 
censes, submitted reports as follows: 

Auctioneer's License Granted— Aaron D. Capen, 
Ward 16. 

Minors' Applications Granted — Fifteen news- 
boys. 

Amusement Licenses Granted— F. H. Butler, to 
give dramatic readings at Beethoven Hall, March 
3 and 6 ; Thomas Chapman, to exhibit legerdemain 
at 107 Cambridge street. 

Intelligence Office Licensed— Kate M. Driscoll, 
65 Dover street. 

Victualler's License Granted— Thomas H. Ross, 
16 Kneeland street. 

Innholder's License Granted— Geerge Raithel, 36 
Kneeland street. 

Wagon Licenses Granted— Stelphing & Co., 574 
Main street; 1. M. Hutchins, Washington street, 
near Haymarket square. 

Pawnbroker Licensed— Jacob Lewis, 627 Wash- 
ington street. 

Severally accepted. 



83 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



■WASHINGTON STREET TO BE RENUMBERED. 

Alderman Power, for the Committee on Paving, 
submitted a report on the petition of A. M. Mor- 
ton <£ Co., et al., that the Washington-street ex- 
tension be numbered, recommending the passage 
of the accompanying order: 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
directed to renumber Washington street, com- 
mencing at Hayniarket square, and continuing 
the sam>i through the city proper to Roxbury, and 
as far in West Koxbury as maybe necessary for 
public convenience. 

The order was read once and laid over. 

THE HORSE-CAR BLOCKADE. 

Alderman Power, for the Committee on Paving, 
to whom was referred th 3 petition of the South 
Boston Railroad Company for new locations — 
Kingston, Summer, Washington, Milk, Chauncy 
and Hawley streets — reported an order of notice 
for a hearing to all parties objecting to the grant- 
ing of said petition, on Monday, March 15, at four 
©'clock P. M. The order was passed. 

PAVING ORDERS. 

Alderman Power, for the Committee on Paving, 
submitted the following: 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer be directed to 
abate the sidewalk assessment, amounting to 
$31.51, against the estate of Maria Shea, No. 166 
West Eighth street, she being unable to pay the 
same. 

Bead twice and passed. 

Schedules of the cost of laying sidewalks in 
Alford street, $1636.50, ard Halleck street, $340.15, 
with orders for the proportionate assessment and 
collection of the same. Orders read twice and 
passed. 

INSPECTION OF BUILDINGS. 

Alderman Pope, for the Joint Committee on 
Survey and Inspection of Buildings, submitted 
the following : 

Report with order authorizing a permit to be 
issued to J Arthur Peck to erect a wooden build- 
ing on Boston & Lowell Railroad quay, according 
to an application on file in the Department for Sur- 
vey and Inspection of Buildings. Order read 
once. 

Ordered, That the Inspector of Buildings he au- 
thorized to employ such clerical assistance as may 
be required in the office of the Department for the 
Survey and Inspection of Buildings, at an expense 
not exceeding $2000: to be charged to the appro- 
priation for Inspection of Buildings. 

Read once. 

BOSTON'S SYSTEM OF SEWERAGE. 

Alderman Power, for the Committee on Sewers, 
submitted the following: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be hereby 
authorized to appoint a commission of three civil 
engineers of experience in the subject, to report 
upon the present sewerage of the city; the dis- 
charge of sewers into Charles Ri^er, Stony Brook, 
South Bay or Dorchester Bay; the necessity of 
any high-water basin on the site of the present 
full basin for flushing purposes ; the expediency 
of relieving the sewers at South End by pumping; 
and to present a plan for the outlets and main 
lines of sewers for the future wants of the city, 
and report if it is expedient in connection with 
the proposed works to provide for iny water ba- 
sins or marginal driveways, as ornamental and 
sanitary features of the city ; the expenses to be 
paid from the appropriation for Sewers. 

Alderman Power— I move that the order take its 
second reading at thia time. 

Alderman Prescott — This is a new matter, com- 
ing entirely unexpected by me, and so important 
that it seems to me that it might be allowed to lie 
over one week, under the rule. I would like to 
have an opportunity to examine the subject fur- 
ther. 

Alderman Power— In view of the importance 
attached to the stwerage question, as shown by 
the remarks of members of this Board, I con- 
sider that the passage of this order should not be 
delayed one single day. The Committee on Sew- 
ers, Mr. Chairman, have no lack of confidence'in 
themselves or in the Superintendent of Sewers; 
they believe that Boston has a system of sewers 
as good as that in any other city in this Union to- 
day. The committee and the Superintendent en- 
tertain those views, and wish to be so understood; 
but, sir, in view of the many criticisms passed 
upon the Sewer Department, which reflect 
seriously f,upon the Superintendent; having 
in view the best interest of the city and be- 



ing most desirous of securing the most com- 
prehensive «ystem of sewerage that can be 
planned for the city of Boston, the Committee on 
Sewers do not wish to be looked upon as standing 
in the way of a thorough investigation of this 
subject Therefore the committee and the Super- 
intendent have put forth this order, hoping that 
it will be passed, and that the most scientific, 
competent engineers in this country — men best 
fitted to judge of this matter— may be selected to 
pass upon tbe subject and show to the citizens 
of Boston whether or not they have a bad sys- 
tem of seweraee — whether the city of Boston 
is in as bad a plight as tho e people who have 
lands to sell to the city for parks would make you 
think. We want this question put be.yona all 
doubt; we desire the appointment of the most 
competent gentlemen who can be found, and we 
want the expense charged to the appropriation 
for sewers. Gentlemen of this Board do not want 
us to stop at any expense for sewers. The com- 
mittee and the Superintendent believe we have a 
good system, and tbat the city of Boston stands 
as well in the matter of sewerage, today, as 
any city in this Union; but, notwithstanding they 
think and feel thus, they say Bostou should have 
a better one if she can get it. If there is any 
better talent than is possessed by your present 
Superintendent of Sewers — whom you have just 
reelected by a unanimous vote— the city of Boston 
should have it. The committee wane ic shown to 
the citizens of Boston whether it is necessary to 
change our system of sewers in order to reclaim 
the flats out there. Before getting your foot into 
anything of that kind, yon should know whether 
you have a good system of sewerage or not. The 
Committee on Sewers did not expect opposition to 
this order; they expected that it would be passed 
unanimously. Having m view the remarks made 
at this Board, they have been thinking of coming 
in here and asking for an appropriation of a mil- 
lion dollars to carry out works in contemplation 
for perfecting the sewers ; but they do not want 
you to appropriate that immense sum of money 
while you have any doubts in regard to the cor- 
rectness of the system or the ability of the Super- 
intendent to manage is. We want this order 
passed that the citizens may know the facts, and 
that we may reply to such articles as have been 
published in the Boston Advertiser and Herald, 
with vague charges made by anonymous writers. 
Nobody knows who is responsible for such state- 
ments, but they have caused an opinion in the 
minds of many good citizens terribly damaging to 
the interests of the city of Boston. The talk at 
this Board has had a very great tendency to dam- 
age the city also. These reiterated statements that 
Boston is Ihe most unhealthy city in this country 
have created a false impression. Show it. You 
have the record of the deaths in Boston and Xew 
York last week. What is the comparative popu- 
lation of the two cities?. A hundred and fifty or 
sixty deaths for Boston— does that show a great- 
er proportion than, it should ? — that Boston is 
more unhealthy? The statistics will not bear out 
those charges. Gentlemen cannot substantiate 
them by facts; and in order to settle this question 
of sewerage effectually we have offered that or- 
der and hope that the best talent in the United 
States will be secured. To judge from the articles 
recently published in the newspapers, ana the crit- 
icisms passed upon the Sewer Department, this 
question of sewerage must be deemed the most 
important before us; and I hope this Board will 
appropriate any sum of money to secure the best 
talent in this country to make a thorough investi- 
gation of the whole subject. Therefore I hope 
the passage of this order will not be delayed, but 
that it will take its second reading at the present 
time. 

Alderman Prescott— With the general tenor of 
the order I heartily aaree, and from the under- 
standing that I have been able to get from its 
reading by tbe Chairman of the Board, I certainly 
should not object to its passage. I think the 
Alderman from Ward 12 is making commendable 
progress, if he is in favor of his Honor the Mayor 
appointing a commission of three persons to ex- 
amine one of the most important matters ever 
Drought to the City Council. Those have been 
my sentiments in regard to the most important 
matters connected with the City Government 
ever since I have had a seat at this 
Board. So far as the appointment of this 
commission of three perpons, to examine this sub- 
ject, is concerned, I heartily agree with the Alder- 
man from Ward 12, although he has heretofore, 
almost always, opposed such propositions for 



FEBRUARY 23, 1875 



83 



the investigation of important matters. I 
do not want to be understood as mak- 
ing any factious opposition to the order 
aDd -would ask the Chairman 10 read it again for 
the information of the Board. 

Alderman Power— In reply I would say I have 
never objected to che appointment of commissions 
for such special purposes as this. 1 do not ask 
for this commisaion because T believe there is 
any incompetency in the department, nor be- 
cause I think any commission can understand or 
manage this subject any better than the present 
Superintendent of Sewers can. I want it under- 
stood that the Committee on Sewers and the Su- 
perintendent do not dread any investigation; on 
the contrary, they seek it. They wish a condem- 
nation or approval of their doings, and do not 
dread the result. They want this excitement 
in regard to bad drainage allayed, that 
the interest of Boston may be served, an* 
that an end may be put to this pub- 
lishing of articles by interested parties and anony- 
mous writers,who have not the courage to signftheir 
names to anything they write, may be stopped. 
Those articles are published for the express 
purpose of pushing this park question. It cannot 
stand on its own merits, and consequently they 
want to couple it with the sewerage question. 

The order was read for information, and then 
read a second time and passed. 

FENCE VIEWERS, ETC. 

Alderman Power offered the following: 
Ordered, That Aldermen be a committee 

to nominate suitable persons for Fence Viewers. 

Field drivers, Inspectors of Lime and Cullers of 

Hoops and Staves. 
Passed, and Aldermen Power, Pope and Worth- 

ingten were appointed said committee. 

PERMITS FOR STABLES. 

■ Alderman Worthington, for the Committee on 
Health on the part of the Board, submitted re- 
ports recommending that leave be granted, on the 
usual conditions, to occupy stables, by Nicholas 
Corcoran, Linden street, Ward 16; John B. Simp- 
son, Orchard street, Ward 17. Severally accepted. 

ORDERS TO PAY FOR STREET DAMAGES. 

Alderman Worthington, for the Committee on 
Streets on the part of the Board, submitted orders 
to pay for street damages as follows : 

Robert M6Devitt and Thomas Haney, $1009.12, 
for widening of Bowcioin street. Read once. 

Charles H. Adams, $75, laying out of Francis 
street west of Brookline avenue. Read twice and 
passed. 

Isaac Pratt, Jr., for himself and as trustee of T. 
F. Tobey, $130, for widening of Federal street. 
Read twice and passed. 

ROUTE OE EAST CAMBRIDGE COACHES. 

Alderman Bigelow, for the Committee on Li- 
censes, submitted a report on petition of John C. 
Stiles— that the East Cambridge coaches be al- 
lowed to go out through Washington street — rec- 
ommending the passage of the accompanying 
order: 

Ordered, That the route of omnibuses running 
between East Cambridge and Boston, prescribed 
by an order passed by this Board Dec. 31, 1874, be 
so far modified as to fix the route outward (from 
this city) for said omnibuses as follows: Through 
Summer street to Washington street; thence 
through Washington street to Haymarket square; 
thence through Merrimac street to Wall street; 
thence through Wall street to Minot street; thence 
through Minot street to Leverett street; thence 
through Leverett street to Cragie's Bridge. 

Read twice and passed. 

CITY STABLE IN CHARLESTOWN. 

Alderman O'Brien offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Committee on Public Lands 
he directed to set apait such a lot of land on 
Canal stieet, Charlestown, as shall be required by 
the Committee on Public Buildings, for the 
erection of a stable tor the use of the Health 
Department. 
Read twice and passed. Sent down. 

MARKET. 

Alderman Prescott offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Superintendent of Faneuil 
Hall Market be puthorized to employ one deputy 
to assist him in the discharge of the duties 
of bis office, said deputy to be approved by the 
Mayor. 

Read twice and passed, after an explanation by 
Alderman Prescott that it was the usual order 
passed at the beginning]of.each year. 



REQUEST FOR ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATION. 

The following (City Doc. No. 30) was received: 

To the Honorable the City Council of the City of 
Boston— The undersigned, in behalf of the Bo'ard 
of Overseers of the Poor, respectfully petitions 
your honorable body tor an additional appropria- 
tion of $25,000, to meet the wants of the depart- 
ment for che remainder of the present financial 
year. The act of the last Legislature, enlarging 
the number of those entitled to a local settlement, 
the great scarcity of work for the laboring classes 
which has marked the present year, together with 
the prolonged inclement season, .rave each a;id all 
combined to make the claims for aid unusually 
pressing, and to snch an amount as was not antici- 
pated when the estimates were submitted to the 
Council for the expenditures of the board the cur- 
rent year. By order of the board, 

F. W. Lincoln, Chairman. 

Office of the Overseers of the Poor, \ 
Boston, Feb. 15, 1875. ( 

Statement of Expenditures, May 1, 1874, to Feb. 
15, 1875. 

Paid for burials, $2764.87 ; cities and towns for 
relief of Boston poor, $5115.36, expenses City 
Temporary Home, $6247.29; pensions and grants 
at office, $17,583.02; immediate relief of persons 
having no settlement, in cash, $687.00; tor fuel, 
$10,815 90 ; for groceries, $28,203.37; tor salaries, 
$10,659.76; for office expenses, $830.08; for trans- 
portation, $47.35; expenses Charity Building, fuel, 
salaries of engineer and janitor, and sundries, 
$3695.56; medical attendance and medicine, 
$583.90; City Treasurer, balance of receipts from 
cities and towns and from occupants of Charity 
Building, to April 30, 1874, $3536.02; Total, $90,- 
769.48. Appropriation, $101,825.00. 
Estimate of Additional Expenditures to April 30, 
1875. 

For burials, $900; Boston poor in other towns, 
$2000; City Temporary Home, $2000; pensions and 
grants, $5000; fu»l, $11,000; groceries, $11,000; sal- 
aries, office expenses and transportation, $2800; 
Charity Building expenses, $900; medical attend- 
ance and medicine, $400; total, $36,000; which will 
require $25,000 in addition to amount appropri- 
ated. 

Referred to Committee on Finance. Sent down. 

THE USE OF DUMMY ENGINES IN THE STREETS. 

Alderman Viles presented a petition from Rob- 
bert Marsh et al., owners and occupants of prop- 
erty located upon Commercial and Causeway 
streets, upon the line of the tracks of the Union & 
Marginal Freight Railroad, and teamsters and 
expressmen of this city doing business upon those 
thoroughfares, representing that the use of steam 
power upon said railroad track is a detriment to 
their business and a damage to their property; 
tb at the speed at which the engines are run en- 
daugexs both life and limb, and they ask that 
horse power may be substituted in those streets in 
place of steam; and thev further ask for a hear- 
ing in regard to this matter. 

Referied to the Committee on Pavmg. 

THE PARK QUESTION. 

Alderman Prescott moved a reconsideration of 
the vote of the last meeting by which the amend- 
ed order for the Mayor to petition the General 
Court for authority "to purchase or otherwise take 
land within the limits of the city" for purpose of 
public parks, was rejected. 

The order as rejected is appended, with the 
amendments in brackets: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to petition the General Cou'-t, now in session, 
for the passage of an act authorizing the city to 
purchase, oi otherwise take, lands within the 
limits of the city for the puipose of laying out 
public parks, and also authorizing the assessment 
of betterments upon the adjoining lands benefited 
by the establishment of such parks; [provided, 
however, that no expenditure shall be author- 
ized' or made for the purchase or improvement of 
any land exceeding in amount the sum raised by 
taxation and appropriated by the City Council 
for that purpose, and all money actually received 
by the city for betterments assessed upon adjoin- 
ing lands] ; [said act nor, to take effect unless ac- 
cented by a majority of the legal voters present, 
and voting thereon at meetings duly called for 
that purpose ic the several wards]. 

Alderman Prescott— Inasmuch as one member 
of the Board [Alderman Harris] is absent this af- 
ternoon ; inasmuch as this whole matter of a pub 
lie park and improved sewerage for our city i ~ 



84 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



now receiving very general discussion both by the 
people and the puolic press; and inasmuch as I 
desire further time to present some facts and 
statements to this Board in regard to tliis impor- 
tant matter, I move that the further consideration 
of the motion to reconsider be specially assigned 
to tbe next regular meeting of the Board <tt five 
o'clock P. M. 

Alderman Power — I hope that neither of the 
motions will prevail. It does not make the 
slightest difference about a member of this Board 
being absent. Gentlemen have discussed this 
matter thoroughly. The member who is absent 
does not need any further light as to the action 
he should take upon it, and before going away he 
provided tor himself. I hope the motion to assign 
will not prevail, and that the matter will he dis- 
posed of now. I call for the yeas and nays on the 
question. 

Alderman Prescott — The Alderman from Ward 
12 has stated that because one member of the 
Board is absent is no reason why we should Dot 
take a vote this afternoon. I stated other rea- 
sons for postponement. I said chat inasmuch as 
this matter was receiving a general discussion by 
the people and press; and that as I desired to 
bring some facts and statements to the Board 
which I am not prepared to do this afternoon, I 
would ask the courtesy of the Board that the mat- 
ter may be specially assigned to the next regular 
meeting. 

Alderman Power— I have heard those arguments 
before. The gentleman has had one week, he has 



had ample time to produce his evidence. I hope 
this matter will not be delayed, hut that the mo- 
tion will be rejected and the matter settled. 

Alderman Prescott — It seems to me that the Al- 
derman from Ward 12 is very much afraid of an 
investigation of the facts in regard to this matter. 
If not, why should he oppose further considera- 
tion of the subject at a future meeting of the 
Board? Perhaps there may he some statements 
made and facts furnished which may influence 
the mind of the absent member. Such a postpone- 
ment will not commit the Board. 

Alderman Power — I contend th°t it will commit 
the Board. There is where all the danger lies— 
the taking of one single step into this, measure. 
This is one of those ruses that I, having had four 
years' experience in this Board, am perfectly fa- 
miliar with, and I trust the other members are 
also familiar with it. 

Alderman Bigelow — My friend, Alderman Har- 
ris, is absent. He differs from me upon this sub- 
ject, and, as I have agreed to pair off with him, I 
ask to be excused from voting. 

Alderman Bigelow was excused hy general con- 
sent. 

The motion to specially assign prevailed — yeas 
6, nays 4. 

Yeas — Aldermen Clark, O'Brien, Prescott, 
Quincy, Stebbins, Worthington — 6. 

Nays — Aldermen Burrage, Pope, Power, Viles 
—4. 

On motion of Alderman Prescott, the Board 
adjourned. 



85 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

FEBRUARY U5, 1875. 



Regular weekly meeting at half-past seven 
o'clock B. M., Halsey J. Boardman, President, in 
the chair. 

PAPERS FBOM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN FOR 
CONCURRENCE. 

Request of Overseers of the Poor, and petitions 
of Colonel B. F. Finan for regimental armory for 
Ninth Regiment, William Bohrman, Ellen Charl- 
ton and Fitchburg Railroad Company. Severally 
referred. 

Order to set apart such a lot of land on Canal 
street, Charlestown, as shall be required for the 
erection of a stable for the Health Department. 
Passed. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order that the expense of a phonographic re- 
port of the inquest on the fire at 145 Court street— 
$255 — be allowed and paid from the appropriation 
lor the Fire Department. Passed in concurrence. 

Order placing the salary of the Fourth Assist- 
ant Solicitor at $2500 per annum, begin aing at the 
date of his appointment. Passed in concurrence. 

Report and oiders establishing the salaries of 
city officers for the current year (City Doc. No. 23). 
The first order took its second reading and was 
passed in concurrence. The President proceeded 
to read the second order, but on motion of Mr. 
Wilson of Ward 12 the several remaining orders 
were read by their gener?! titles and severally 
passed in concurrence, without objection. 

ELECTIONS. 

The following elections occurred: 
Superintendent of Dover-street Bridge. Certifi- 
cate of the election, by the Board of Aldermen, 
of Angus Nelson as Superintendent of Dover- 
street Bridge, in place of Francis M. Hughes, 
chosen by this Council. Messrs. Barry of Ward 7, 
Wadsworth of Ward 4, and Anderson of Ward 3 
were appointed a committee to receive, sort and 
count votes. They reported- 
Whole number of votes 61 

Necessary for a choice 31 

Angus Nelson had 36 

Francis M. Hughes 25 

And Mr. Nelson was declared elected in concur- 
rence. 

Second Assistant Assessors. Messrs. Page of 
Ward9,Wilson of Ward 12 and Willcutt of Ward 17 
were appointed a committee to receive, sort and 
count votes. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 stated that Edward J. Hol- 
land, whose name was printed on one of the tick- 
ets as a candidate from Ward 5, was not a candi- 
date for the office. 

The ballot proceeded, and on motion of Mr. Par- 
ker of Ward 14 a recess was taken, after which 
the committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of ballots : 69 

Necessary for a choice 35 

Ward 1. 
George Shackford, 52; Isaiah Whitten, 67; John 
Hartnett, 16; W. F. Brooks, 1; C. R. McLean, 1. 

Ward 2. 
James E. Toner, 68; William N. Starrett, 68; 
Michael Barr, 1 ; C. F. McDevitt, 1. 

Ward 3. 
Artemas R. Holden. 36; Joseph Allen, 11; Mi- 
chael F. Wells, 22. 

Ward 4. 

Martin Dowlicg, 69; W. S. Whitney, 67; Dennis 
F. Ryan, 1. 

Ward 5. 

Roger H. Scannell, 60; John J. Murphy, 66; P. 
J. Hascine-s, 3; Edward J. Holland, 3; Benjamin 
Callender, 1 ; H. L. Bowker, 2. 

Ward 6. 
John T. Prince, 68; L. R. Cutter, 1. 

Ward 7. 
Dudley Pray, 41; Dennis Moore, 50; Jeremiah 
Sullivan, 36; William Gallagher, 1. 

Ward 8. 
I»aD. Davenpoit, 68. 



Ward 9. 
Francis R. Stoddard, 69; Frederick A. Wilkins, 
65 ; James Standish, 2. 

Ward 10. 
F. S. Risteen, 68; M. Cunniff, 1. 

Ward 11. 
William B. Smart, 65; S. S. Cudworth, 4. 

Ward 12. 
Thomas Leavitt, 64; John E. Huntress, 56; M. H 
Keenan, 18. 

Ward 13. 
Edward W. Dolan, 68; Edward Kelly, 1. 

Ward 14. 
Elbridge G. Scott, 68; William H. Mcintosh, 
68; Edward Kelly, 1; J. W. Steere, 1. 
Ward 15. 
John W. Steere, 46; John C. Coombs, 43; J. F. 
Atwood, 8; Edward Kelly, 35; John McElroy, 1. 
Ward 16. 
George W. Conant, 68; E. H. R. Ruggles, 68; 
Richardson Hutchinson, 65; Sylvester Hubbard, 
4 ; Aaron D. Capen, 1. 

Ward 17. 
George H. Williams, 53; Edward M. Skinner, 47; 
Altien Bartlett, 36. 

Ward 19. 

Richard B. Smart, 52; Jacob F. Taylor, 16; Wil- 
liam B. Smart, 1. 

Ward 20. 
Dennis G. Quirk, 69. 

Ward 21. 
Isaac W. Derby, 68; Henry Dana, 1. 

Ward 22. 
D. D. Taylor, 69. 

And the following-named persons were declared 
elected in concurrence : 

Ward 1— George Shackford, Isaiah Whitten; 
Ward 2— James E. Toner, William M. Starrett ; 
Ward 3— Artemas R. Holden; Ward 4— Martin 
Dowling, W. S. Whitney ; Ward 5— Roger H. Scan- 
nell, John J. Murphy ; Ward 6— John T. Prince; 
Ward 7— Dudley Pray, Dennis Moore; Ward 8— Ira 
D. Davenport; Ward 9— Francis R. Stoddard, 
Frederick A. Wilkirs; Ward 10— F. S. Risteen; 
Ward 11— William B. Smart; Ward 12— Thomas 
Leavitt, John E. Huntress; Ward 13— Edward W. 
Dolan; Ward 14— Elbridge G. Scott, William H. 
Mcintosh; Ward 15— John W. Steere, John C. 
Coombs; Ward 16— George W. Conant, E. H. R. 
Ruggles, Richardson Hutchinson; Ward 17— 
George H. Williams, Edward M. Skinner; Ward 
19— Richard B. Smait; Ward 20— Dennis G. Quirk; 
Ward 21— Isaac W. Derby; Ward 22— D. D. Tay- 
lor. 

THE SUDBURY RIVER SCHEME. 

The President called attention to the notice of 
intention to move a reconsideration of the vote 
whereby at the last meeting were passed the or- 
ders appropriating $1,500,000 for extension of the 
Cocnituate Water Works, ana granting authority 
for said extenfion [Reprinted City Doc. No. 20, 
1875, with amendments of the Board (if Aldermen 
thereto], and said that a motion was in order. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 — I had the honor of giving 
notice in the manner required by the rule 
of n~y intention to move a reconsideration of the 
question low brought to the attention of the 
Council by the Chair. My reasons for doing that, 
Mr. President, were, as has been well known, that 
I have always invariably opposed the introduction 
of water from Sudbury River by way of 
Farm Pond. j.'hat has been the whole point of my 
opposition during the last year and is the point of 
my opposition today so far as that opposition 
rests in my own eyes. I have had no change of 
opinion, sir, upon the subject. I believe now as 
I believed then, that the carrying out of the plan 
of creating a new conduit from Farm Pond 
would be an unnecessary expenditure of money, 
and that the amount of water needed for an ad- 
ditional supply for the city could be obtained by 
means which have been suggested in opposition 
to this Sudbury scheme. At the meeting of the 
Council before the last, the honorable gentleman 
from Ward 12 [Mr. Wilson] who is a mem- 
ber of the Water Committee, rose in his place and 
stated that he required more time to consider a 
subject as important as this, and made a 
somewhat lengthy speech, asking at the same 
time that the measure be put over and its consid- 
eration further postponed for another week, in 
order to give him more time. I believed that, sir 



FEBRUARY 25, 1875 



86 



to be a reasonable proposition : I advocated it, it 
was carried and the matter was laid over until the 
next meeting of tke Council, which was the last 
meeting, one week since. Tne matter was then 
brought before rlie Council, sir, and the gentle- 
man troru Ward 12 did not rise in his place to 
offer any new and additional reasons why he be- 
lieved theplan to be objectionable. JNothingwhat- 
evei was said, sir, substantially, upon the subject, 
and a vote was taken. Desiring, sir, as I always 
do, »o advocate what I believe a majority of the 
people— and more especially a majority of the 
City Government, who have the inattor directly in 
charge— desire, I voted, sir, with the majority, 
the great majority, sir. I die it thru, sir, with a 
mental reservation, knowing it was my right that 
if any additional reasons should bs givsn by the 
gentleman or anybody else, during the week, in 
favor of his plan or in opposition to tbe Sudbury 
scheme, the-opportunity then would be given to 
have the matter debated. From that day to this, 
sir. no gentleman has spoken to me with regard to 
it, or intimated a desire to debate it here at this 
meeting in opposition to that scheme. Now, sir, 
that being the condition of matters at pres- 
ent, and desiring always to do that which 
shall be in accord with the general senti- 
ment of the people, tor the time being, to say 
nothing, of what may have been the cause of my 
great— or what may have been then— opposition 
during the past year, I am prepared to favor the 
increase. Taking it, sir, at the present moment, 
I believe that the people of Boston are in favor 
of an additional supply of water. And, repeating 
that which I have said before, both this evening 
and on former occasions — that I was always ready 
to talk and vote for an appropriation of money 
for an additional supply of water, having my 
choice of the way in which it s hould be brought 
here, and being always in favor of doing that 
which I believed to be for the best interest of the 
city, I shall advocate the Sudbury scheme as it 
stands today and shall withdraw entirely the no- 
tice which I gave of intention to move a, reconsid- 
er ? tion. 
The President— Th3 notice is withdrawn. 

SWETT STREET. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 7, the Council 
proceeded to consider the special assignment for 
eight o'clock, viz., order for a loan of $476,000 for 
widening, building and extending Sw-_tt street 
from Albany street to Dorchester avenue, the 
question being on the passage of the order. 

Mr. Page of Ward 9— Since the last meeting of 
the Council I ht,ve taken occasion to look into this 
laying out and extending of Swett street, for the 
purpose of ascertaining the position of the city 
in the matter. I have come to the conclusion 
that so far as I can interpret the laws and or- 
dinances on the subject, the city does not 
stand in the position that I supposed it 
occupied, when I spoke a week ago tonight. In 
my judgment it is perfectly competent for this 
Coui.cil to go into the merits of this question of 
laving out and extending Swett street just the 
same as though last year's Council had iiot con- 
cuired with the Street Commissioners in taking 
the lano and laying out the street. In my judg- 
ment that action of last year's Council did not so 
commit this Government that we are prevented 
from reconsidering it or from using whatever 
judgment we see fit, either in indorsing the acts 
of last year's Council or rejecting or changing 
that action, as we choose. I am free to say that — 
believing that to be the state of the matter— I, for 
one, am opposed to the passage of this order, and 
would much prefer to go into the merits of the 
question and discuss the advisability of lay- 
ing out the street. I find by referring 
to the General Statutes, that no damage can be 
paid, and no person can claim any damage for the 
laying out of a street until the land over which 
the roadway or highway is to pass has been en- 
tered upon or taken possession of for the pur- 
pose of constructing the street. The land over 
which Swett street is to pass has not been taken ; 
no entry has been made upon the property, and no 
representatives of the city of Boston, as I under- 
stand it, are authorized to make such entry or to 
take any steps toward carrying out the act of last 
year's Council until they have some money to do 
it with. I think it is hardly proper at this state of 
business, in the present condition of the city 
finances, and during the depression of trade, 
to authorize a loan of $475,000 or $500,000 for the 
purpose of carrying out this improvement, which 
can well afford to wait. I think it would hardly 



be cesir.ible for the city to go into this expendi- 
ture at the present time, and, therefore, 1 hope 
the order will not pass. 

Mr. Clarke ot Ward 15— We are required by 
this order to provide the means ror widening and 
extending Swett street from Albanv street to Dor- 
chester avenue, at an expense of about half a 
million dollars. The Board of Street Commission- 
ers reported their action upon this matter to the 
last City Council Oct. 22, and it was referred to 
the Joint Standing Committee on Streets. It re- 
mained in their hands until December 14, only 
fourteen days before the last meeting of the Coun- 
cil, and when the Council had other matters of 
more consequence to act upon. It should then 
have been referred to this City Council for proper 
investigation and action, but it was hurried 
through the Council at their last meeting, and we 
are now called upon, to furnish this larg° amount 
tor the construction of the street and to father 
this scheiie, the cost of which is to be included in 
our expenditures. This nroposed street is a cross 
street commencing at Albany street and moving in" 
a northeasterly direction across the South Bay to 
Dorchester avenue in South Boston, and will be of 
no benefit to the Roxbuiy District for many years 
unless the Legislature adopt a pl?n for the termi- 
nal facilities of the railroads to deep water at 
South Boston, as is proposed And while it will 
be of no great benefit to Roxbuiy, and may be 
of some benefit to South Boston, r. either the Street 
Commissioners nor the Joint Standing Committee 
on Streets, in their report', say that public neces- 
sity for travel requires that this street should be 
made at this time. In the other branch, a few 
nights since, it was argued by the Alderman from 
Ward 12 [Alderman Power] against a great public 
improvement on the Back Bay, as proposed, — and 
which concerns tbe whole city,— that during the 
present depressed condition of business and the 
finances of the city we must use the great- 
est economy; and he stated that in his 
committees he had advised that the appro- 
priations for the coming year be cut down, 
and some of them at one half less than last year, 
as reasons why authirity should not be procured 
from the Legislature to allow the people to vote 
upon that matter ; also that "he was opposed to 
spending money for anything except it is demand- 
ed by absolute necessity" ; and again he says, "I 
desi' e to have it appear as part of the record that 
I am opposed to any measure that will involve the 
expenditure of money at this time, the city being 
heavily in debt, the taxes for municipal purposes 
very high, and all kinds of business in an unusual- 
ly depressed condition" ; also that the petitioners 
and advocates of that measure were land specula- 
tors. 'Now, sir, foi these very reasons at our last 
meeting I did expect that the chairman of the 
Committee on Streets from this Council, being 
from one of the South Boston wards,would at least 
move to have this order laid on the table until 
warm weather, when we shall have been thawed 
out, and perhaps found that the world still re- 
volves around the "hub," and that it is advisable 
to go ahead again. I was very much surprised, 
after making that motion, that he should oppose 
it and press a favorable action upon the order 
at that time, upon the ground of economy. Now, 
sir, let us examine this matter a little further. 
Who are the projectors and parties particularly 
interested in tbe extension of this street? Whv, 
sir, land companies and land speculators, and 
some of them the same parties the Alderman re- 
ferred to as owners in the lane's upon the proposed 
Back Bay park, and who he said are pressing 
them upon the city to buy, in order to build up 
their broken fortunes. I thought he would 
like to know this fact, as I believe he sup- 
ported this measure, and that only a few 
weeks ago. No argument upon economy then! 
Let us see what we have done for South Boston 
the past year. I see by tbe report of the Superin- 
tendent of Streets (City Document No. 27, page 
33), there was expended by the Paving Department 
in the city proper, $396,644.92; in Roxbury, $184,- 
283.02; in S ruth Boston, $151,606.96; in East Bos- 
ton, $97,624.15; in Dorchester, $103,224.01; in 
Charlestown, $101,357.67; in West Roxbury, $87,- 
546.16. There was expended upon streets in Sonth 
Boston $53,982.81 more than in East Boston, $48,- 
382.95 more than in Dorchester, $64,060.80 more 
than in West Roxbury, $80,593.48 more than in 
Brighton , and $50,249.29 more than in Charlestown. 
Now, sir, let us examine one item of paving. I 
find there was expended in South Boston for wood 
paving, $32,755.51; for granite blocks, $51,177.26; 
total, $83,932.77. In Charlestown— granite blocks, 



87 



COMMON COUNCIL 



$55,037.99, and no wood. In East Boston- 
granite blocks, $13,861.52, and no wood. In 
Roxbury, Dorchester, West Roxbury and Biigk- 
ton, no paving, and in tbe city proper, for granite 
blocks, $106,128.74, for wood, $4,755.60. South Eos- 
ton had about one-balf as much as was expended 
in the city proper for small granite blocks, and 
$27,999.91 more wood paving— a luxury that none 
of the other districts enjoyed the past year, if 
they ever do. Allow rue for a moment to refer to 
the report of the Superintendent of Sewers for 
the past vear. [City Document No. 17.] There 
was expended in Cliarlesto-m, $3,894.37; in East 
Boston, $11,965.35; in Dorchester, $12,032.54; in 
the city proper, $18,337.88; in South Boston, $28,- 
600.34, making $10,262.46 more in South Boston 
than in the city proper; $16,567.80 more than in 
Dorchester; $16,634.99 more than in East Boston, 
and $24,705.97 moie tban in Charlestown. I refer 
to these places because they border upon tide 
water. 1 doubt not that the expenditures were 
necessaiy. Then again, let us lefer to 
the Auditor's monthly exhibit, [Docu- 
ment No. 21] for Special Appropriations. 
We find the Eastern-avenue and Bridge Loan 
$200,000; Broadway Bridge foundations, $110,295. 
Then of the $1,000,000 Broadway-extension Loan 
we have $80,680.21 unexpended. This Broadway- 
extension project has a foothold. Is it to be ex- 
tended to Cambridge? We shall have the South 
Boston Protective Association after more loans 
before the year is out. Then again, South Boston 
wants tbi* year $200,000 or $300,000 for a school- 
house. It is rpfreshing, sir, to hear the clarion 
notes of economy first coming from the Alderman 
from Ward 12. Perhaps we can borrow this unex- 
pended balance of $80,680.21 from the Broadway- 
extension Loan, and the $54,150.99 unexpended 
Broadway Bridge Foundation Loan to divide up 
amongst' the rest of the wards, rather than 
come to a dead stand. i see that by 
Sweet street crossing the Hartford & Erie 
Railroad at grade we shall save $100,000. 
With the small amount of travel which will re- 
quire to be accommodated for a number of years, 
is it not advisable to get the proper authority to 
cross at grade? The new proposed Junction Rail- 
road to connect the Hoosac Tunnel line and other 
roads with South Boston flats, by tunnelling Tel- 
egraph Hill, has so far progressed, I understand, 
that the stock has been subscribed for. When 
this load is made, the Hartford & Erie may pos- 
sibly give up thtir present route through South 
Boston and come in over the new route. Then 
this proposed expenditure for raising the grade 
would be worthless, besides the damage it would 
cause to that locality. The committee, in their 
report, say that, among the concessions granted 
by the owners of these lands, they release all 
grade damages, including the right to slope the 
filling- on their lands. I would like to know 
haw they could abut upon the line of the street if 
they did not. 1 do not think they would object if 
the city filled up ail their flats. There are several 
large improvements called for and which will soon 
come before us, such as the Home for the Poor, 
or Austin-farm project, and the removal of the 
House of Correction from South Boston. Ithiuk 
the Home for the Poor should be moved, but not 
to tbe Austin farm; and the House of Correction 
ought to have been moved years ago, and the* land 
u?ed for business purposes." Then Columbus ave- 
nue, the finest we have in the city, ends at a board 
fence. Boylston street should be extended to 
Brookline avenue, and lelieve the crowded travel 
over Beacon street. Then Ruggles street sbould 
be extended to Brookline avenue, and Longwood 
avenue to Washington street. I do not wish it to 
be understood that 1 am wholly opposed to the 
extension of Swett street, or to anything that will 
add to the prosperity of South Boston, or any 
other portion of the city. She has remarkable 
facilities, if properly developed, for the increase 
of our commerce and manufactuiing interests; 
but it seems to me proper that we should defer 
rhis matter until after the Auditor reports upon 
the annual estimates of appropriations, and if 
other proposed improvements for the benefit of 
other portions of the city are to be thrown into 
the basket, I wish this one to keep them 
company. For The health of the people, 
both the Back Bay and South Bav should be 
tilled up, or something done by the city to 
abate these nuisances, and it is a disgrace to the 
city that that territory, so near the city proper, 
should have remained so long worthless and use- 
less, while its owners have been ruined by its ex- 
cessive taxation, year after year, upon a specula- 



tive valuation, without one dollar of the large 
amount of taxes improperly assessed expended 
upon it. There is nojusticeinit. [tisafraud. Atthe 
last meeting, when I termed this a wild scheme, 
I was not allowed time to explain. I meant that 
it was a wild scheme compared with other more 
needed improvements, which ought to teceive 
your attention first; and if, upon a false theory of 
economy, they are to be postponed this year, 
there is no reason why this should be passed at 
this time. For sanitary reasons, the city should 
adopt some plan to have this territory fillod 
up, and then it will be but a little expense 
to lay out the larger portion of this street, 
and I tru^t some legislative action may 
be procured for this ena, if found necessary. 
The cost of this project will extend seven or 
eight important avenues leading westward 1o 
Brookline, and which will increase ths taxable 
piopeity twenty times as much as this street. In 
regard to the economy of doing it at the present 
time on account of the cheapness of labor, 1 pre- 
sume every gentleman here well knows that all 
the gravel will be brought in by cars, and that the 
principal part ot the labor will be performed out 
of the city, and tnat steam shovels will be used 
on the hill in taking the gravel out, and perhaps 
a dozen men could do all the levelling of gravel 
on the street. So far as the matter of economy is 
concerned I think it is hardly worthy our atten- 
tion. 

Mr. Guild of SVard 6— There seems to be some 
little diffeie nee of opinion among gentlemen of 
this Council m regard to the position of the city 
in this matter. I certainly had a conversation 
with a gentleman whom I considered an expert 
official— one for many years in the service ot the 
city — and he was of the opinion that the order for 
laying out the street having been passed by the 
Street Commissioners ano the City Council, and 
agreements having been entere J into, the city is 
so far committed that it would be absolutely nec- 
essary for us to provide the means to carry out 
those" contracts. But since then, it seems' that 
further inquiries show that no actual en- 
try has been made upon the street ex- 
cept upon paper, and there seems to be 
a question whether tlie city cannot recede, or hold 
the matter securely in abeyance. From that it 
seems to me to be necessary for some action to be 
taken in order that we, at least some of us — I must 
confess that I would like some information on the 
subject— may find out exactly what is the position 
of the city. Certainly, m the Finance Committee 
we were instructed that unless we did go on, the 
city would be liable for damages and fiat suits 
would be immediately entered. H that is the 
case, sir, it would seem that we must go on, we 
are so far committed ; but if not, I think we ought 
to postpone the matter until we can get advice from 
the City Solicitor. If there is a chance to bold it in 
abeyance, that gentlemen may satisfy themselves 
that now is the time to make that improvement, 
they should have that opportunity. As I paid be- 
fore, I have been informed that the city is com- 
mitted to the improvement,and gentlemen opposed 
to it aie in the position of one who, having been 
absent from his business for several months, 
found that his associate had built a large waie- 
house for a business which he hoped to do in five 
orsix years' time, and that he had got up the first 
story, and on reasoning with his business asso- 
ciate, saying he did not need such accommoda- 
tion, he was informed that the contracts had been 
entered into a:.d all he had to do was to pay for the 
woik. We were informed that the city was in this 
position, but trom the leniarks of gentlemen at this 
and a former session, I should infer that we are 
not. I shoul 1 like to be informed as to the effect 
of our action. 

Mr. Jaques of Ward 9—1 trust this measure will 
not be pressed to a vote tonight. There is a dif- 
ference of opinion in regard to the situation of 
the city in relation to this measure. I have en- 
deavored during the last two or three days, by a 
studv of the ordinances and such infoimation as 
I could get from the City Solicitor's office, to gain 
some information in regard to those points. So 
far as I have been able to learn, it seems to me 
that the id?a advanced at our last meeting in re- 
gard to the position of the city — that it is commit- 
ted to this measure beyond recall— is not correct. 
I do not. think that all the pioceedings neces- 
sary to put us in that position have been com- 
sum mated. The laws ann ordinances relating io 
the laying out of streets seem to contemplate a 
series of steps, the taking of all of which is neces- 
sary to consummate such a project as this. Firs t 



FEBRUARY 25, 1875 



88 



£ 



the Street Commissioners take action ; that actioD 
is concurred in by a majority of the City Council ; 
the matter in then referred to the Fiiance Com- 
mittee in regard to the appropriation ; then the 
appropriation itself, to he passed upon, requires a 
two-thirds vote. Now, if gentlemen will notice in 
these proceedings that, if they are not all taken as 
a whole, th.-re is a manifest inconsistency almost 
amounting- to an absurdity in the position that a 
majority of the City Council can commit the city 
to such a measure, while to make the ap- 
propriation a two-thirds vote is required. 
Njw, what is the use of requiring a two- 
thirds vote it we cannot help ourselves? I con- 
sider that the two-thirds vote was intended to be 
used in the discretion ot the Council, as a sort of 
veto pow r — as, for iustanue, if the Finance Com- 
mittee shoubi report, taking into account all the 
conditions, giving then- reasons why the city can- 
not afford to pass this or that measure, and the 
Council, having considered that repoit, might 
then vote that it is not expedient to make the 
appropriation. Now, allusion has been made to 
the Finance Committee, and to instructions being 
given to chem. I believe that the city has fallen 
into a loose and false practice in regai d to that 
thing. 1 have the houor to be on that committee, 
and wheu this question came up — most of them 
toeing new members— they wanted to understand 
what their position was, and whether they were to 
act merely as the instruments of the Council and 
frame the order, or -whether they were to con- 
sider the expediency of the measure, and report 
accordingly. In the orainance establishing a 
Fiuance Committee [page 216, section 7], after pre- 
scribing their duties, it says, "And consioerantt re- 
port on all subjects relating to the finances of the 
city." Now if they are simply to frame these or- 
ders without expressing any opinion, what is the 
meaning of the words "consider and report"? 
However, I merely say that in passing. What I 
would like to ask of the CounMl is to defer action 
upon this subject for one week more. Ceitainly 
no harm can be done by it. The work will not b3 
commenced in that time; we have a year from 
next July to complete that work in, and one 
week's delay will do no harm. Meantime I 
should like' " to offer an order which con- 
templates asking tae City Solicitor's opin- 
ion as ^o the nature of the liability which the 
city has in case it does not enter upon the land 
and build this street. I want that opinion for two 

reasons: Firs To know just how we stand upon 

that question. We have authority from members 
on one siie and the other, e.qually cntitl-dto 
stand as such, and we can get the City Solicitor's 
opinion only in some such way. It is of vast im- 
portance as applied to this particular measure, 
for we can jucge better how to treat the subject 
on its meiits after we get the opinion. Second — 
We want it settled for all time, whether action 
taken in this way means one thing or another; 
whether all these steps are to be taken in part or 
as ? whole, and whether a majority of the City 
Council can commit the city to a measure the ap- 
propriation for which requires a two-thirds vote. 
Therefore, I move that this subject be specially 
assigned to next Thursday evening at eight 
o'clock, aid at the proper time I will offer the 
order alluded to. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7—1 have no objection to the 
special. assignment; in tact, I didn't come here 
tonight prepared with any set speech or any 
amount of figures, as the gentleman fiom Ward 15 
did, as I did not anticipate that he w-s coining 
here to attack South B as con in regard to the 
amount of money expended theie. By his re- 
marks he would g ! ve the Council to understand 
that this is altogether a South Boston improve- 
ment, while everybody who has been in the Coun- 
cil during the past ft w yeais knows it is as much 
for the interest of the people of Dorchester and 
Roxbury as it is for South Boston. I have no de- 
sire to press this matter tonight Perhaps at the 
next meeting I will be as fully prepared with fig- 
ures as the gentleman fiom Ward 15 was tonight. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 15— I would like to amend 
the motion by making it to lay the order on the 
table till the firjt meeting of the Council in June. 
We can then have time to look into the matter, 
visit the territory, and see whether it is necessary 
to spend this nio^ey to carry out the project. 

Mr. Train — 1 hope the amendment "ill not pre- 
vail. I have no objection to this matter being 
specially assigned, and 

The President— lhe amendment of the gencle- 
man from Ward 15 is equivalent lo an adjourn- 



ment, and the Chair will take the sense of tbe 
Council on the longest time first. 

Mr. Train — I have no objection to having this 
matter assigned to next Thursday evening, but it 
seems to have taken on anew complication en- 
tirely. It has departed from tr.e expediency of 
the measure to the proDriety of the Councl of 
last year going into the question, and to whether 
this Council is obliged to indorse their action. 
As I said before, I will net attempt to make any 
extended remarks, because I am willing to have 
this legal question settled ; but that does not af- 
fect the fact of the necessity for carrying this 
matter through last year. We did not stand at 
any technicalities then ; but we took the giound 
that it was for the interest of the city of Boston — 
not a local measuie at all, but for the interest of 
all. I hope the amendment wnl not prevail. 

The question was put on postponing further con- 
sideration of the subject till June, and it was lost. 
The order was then especially assigned for eight 
o'clock P. M., next Thursday. 

Mr. Jaques of Ward 9 offered the following, 
vihica the President ruled inadmissible at that 
stage of pioceedings, but at the suggestion of Mr. 
Flynn of Ward 7, who said it was germare to the 
subject, and hoped, it would be entertained, the 
order was entertained by general consent: 

Ordered, That the Committee on the Judiciary 
be requested to obtain the opinion of the City 
Solicitor as to the nature of the liability on the 
part of the city in case Swett street, upon T/hich 
partial actioa was taken by the City Council in 
1874, is not enteied upon and built, and report at 
the next meeting of the Council. 

Mr. Flvnn of Ward 7 — It appears to me that a 
part of this order ought to be stricken out, — that 
is, the clause relating to the entry. I believe the 
city has entered upon a part of it, the deeds are 
ready to be approved by the City Solicitor, and 
the parties are waiting for their pay. Part of the 
street has been entered upon and taken, and the 
work is ready to be carried through whenever the 
appropriation is made. 

Mr. Jaques ot Ward 9— My object was to make 
the order as general as possible, that we might 
have the City Solicitor's opinion exactly as to how 
the matter does st <nd, in every point. Therefore, 
the statement that certain things have been done 
would not be any cause for varying the wording 
of the order. We want this statement to come in 
an authoritative way from the City Solicitor's 
office, and then it can be considered in this Council. 

Mr. Clatke of Ward 15— It s-ems to me, sir, that 
this matter ought to be referred to the Finance 
Committee, to ascertain and ;eportif the city is 
legally liable for any expenditure of money upon 
Swett street at this time, and if so, to what 
amount? That would bring the whole matter be- 
fore them ; thev could asce r tain the legal points 
from, the City Solicitor, the committee could learn 
just what has beet done, we should know then 
just the amount the city is liable for, and if liable 
we can vote the money. 

The order was passed. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 15 offered an order referring 
the sub j ect of the Swett-street loan to the Com- 
mittee on Finance. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 raised the point that the 
matter had already been specially assigned, and 
the legal question had been leferred. 

Mr. Train of Wars 13 suggested that the City 
Solicitor could learn from the Street Crmmission- 
ers just wliat had been done, and he could report 
on the legal question. 

Mr. Claike withdrew the order. 

REVISION OF THE WARDS. 

On motion of Mr. Wbitmore of Ward 4, the 
Council proceeded to comider the special assign- 
ment for 8y 2 o'elock, viz., Order to amend the pe- 
tition for a new number of wards, to provide that 
each ward shall elect two members of the Com- 
mon Council and two members of the School 
Committee. 

Mr. Whitmore obtained leave to amend the or- 
der by adding "and that the number of wards be 
fixed at thirty-six," so that it lead as follows : 

Ordered, That his honor the M"yor be request- 
ed to amend his petition concerning the number 
of wards, now before th^ Legislature, so that after 
the new r,i vision of wards each ward shall elect 
two members of the Council and two members of 
the School Committee, and that the number of 
wards be fix^d at thirty-six. 

The question wis uoon the passage of the order. 

Mr. Whitmore— This question was brought up 



89 



COMMON COUNCIL 



by me at the Isst meeting aud I made a few state- 
ments in regard to the importance of taking ac- 
tion ai the present time, and I beg the Council to 
excuse me for i epeating one or two of the argu- 
ments I then use:. As to the necessity for a new 
division of the wards, there can be no doubt. I 
have here an official report made by the chairman 
of the Board of Registration of Voters, stating 
that Ward 1 has on the list 5140 voters and Ward 
12, 4627, while Ware. 5 has only 1183 and Ward 19 
only 1151. That statement I tbink is sufficient 
in itselt to explain the necessity for a new divi- 
sion of the wards; but for the information of the 
members I will furnish the full report of the num- 
oer of voteis on the li;ts of 1874, prepared by the 
Registrars of Voters— 

AVard Printed. Written. Total. 

1 4.935 205 5,140 

2 2.346 576 2,922 

3 2,508 206 2,714 

4 1,907 122' 2,029 

5 1,094 89 1,183 

6 2,522 177 2,699 

7. ?,432 280 2,712 

S 2,022 133 2,155 

9 3,095 121 3,216 

10 2.795 100 2,895 

11 3.650 88 3,738 

12 4,419 208 4,627 

13 1447 88 1,535 

14 2,805 99 2,904 

15 2,585 188 2,773 

Hi 3,152 109 3,261 

17 1,995 192 2,187 

19 1,042 109 1,151 

20 1,954 250 2,204 

21 2,361 200 2,561 

22 2,273 166 2,439 

53,339 3,706 57.045 

As tie matter no^v stands, we Jean make this 
division -"mly once in ten years. If it is 
not clone this year we cannot do it for ten 
years, and the inequalities will increase dur- 
ing that term. As the charter now stands, we 
are obliged, after the new division, to have four 
Common Councilmen and six School Committee- 
men from each wtrtl, although at present all the 
twenty one wards do not have the full number 
which we should then have. We have at present 
a representation equivalent to eighteen and one- 
half wards — seventy-four members instead of 
eighty-four. Unless some action is taken at this 
time, at the next division we shall have to leduce 
the number of wards or increase the number of 
the Council. I presume, sir, that there is no good 
argument to be given for postponing this matter. It 
was said by one or two at the last meeting that this 
matter might be well postponed until the new 
charter came up. But UDless gentlemen are per- 
fectly sure that that chaiter will be passed by 
this Council and the Legislatme this season, and 
adopted by the people, it would not be safe to 
postpone the consideration of a matter which can 
only be done this year. I presume tbat, after 
further consideration, those gentlemen will hardly 
press that argument at this time. We have plenty 
of time to attend to it now, and now is" the proper 
time to act upon it. The main question involved 
is in regard to the number of Councilmen. If we 
wish to maintain the number of Councilmen at or 
about the present number, we cannot have more 
than eighteen wards, or nineteen at the extreme, 
and if we wish to diminish the number 
of Councilmen we must have still fewer wards. 
For that reason I put in the amendment that the 
number of Councilmen fiom each ward be fixed 
at two, which will not incres.se the total of the 
Council. The Committee on the Revision of the 
Wards reported through its chairman to the Board 
of Aldermen an order by which the Mayor peti- 
tioned for an amendment to the charter, allowing 
the Council to divide the city into any number of 
wards hereafter to be decided by the Council. At 
the present time it is our duty to fix the number 
of wards we desire. The Legislature will not 
leave the matter in an uncertain proposition, of 
course. The question is whether we shall 
have twenty-four or thirty-six wards, with 
two or three members of the Council and School 
Committee from each. A certain advantage is to 
be derived from having small wards, which will 
be palpable to every one. We ate in a position 
now in regard to our wards different from any 
that we have been in before. The wards now are 
so large, particularly those recently added, that it 
is extremelv inconvenient to have but one polling 
place in each. We have, indeed, petitioned the 
Legislature to enable us to have more than one 
polling place in a ward; but if you establish them, 



what is that but having another ward ? It i« very 
evident that Dorchester and West Roxbury, 
where the territory is measured by miles, and tlie 
population is scattered, with no distiact centre, 
will not long be content with a single polliog 
place, and within fi ve years we shall have to ask 
for power to establish more than one voting pre- 
cinct for each ward. It seems to me, tnerifo;e, 
that it is proper to divide the city into smaller 
wards, and that it is de irable to increase the 
number from twenty-one to twenty- four, or per- 
haps thirty. If u e fix the number at twenty-four 
or thirty, we have at once, as a parr of the action, 
to alter the number of Common Councilmen or 
School Committeemen, otherwise the sum total 
of each w.ll oe too alarmingly,, large to be consid- 
ered for a moment. With the present number 
from each ward, ve should have 180 School 
Committeemen here, and 120 Councilmen, and 
that of course, would be out of the ques- 
tion. The question chiefly for the Council to 
consider is this — Do we desir? to reduce the num- 
ber of the Council? The order which was put in 
first, in the Board of Aldermen, under instruction 
from the committee, looked to a reduction of the 
Council to sixty, about one-sixth. If that is the 
de ire of the Council, it would be a piece of self 
denial which would go far to close the mo'itbs of 
our adversaries in case we io not adopt the new 
charter, and would show that members v. ere not 
too desirous of retaining place. It was the senti- 
ment of the Board of Aldermen that the action 
on the representation from each ward should be 
initiated in this branch, and I think there should 
be some distinct understanding, by vote of the 
Council, whether they desire to reduce or in- 
crease the number of waids and give som» ex- 
pression of their preference on the subject 
of representation. If the first amendment I 
offered can be acted on, I think the other can be 
easily disposed of. For that reason I desire to 
have the question first taken upon the largest 
number of wards, namely, thirty-six; tecause if 
we conclude to fix the number of wards at thirty- 
six, it is very certain that we shall proceed to fix 
the number from each ward at two, for we cer- 
tainly should not make it three or four. 

Mr'. Crocker of Ward 6— Do I understand the 
gentleman to say that he considers it necessary to 
fix the number of wards? It had not occurred to 
me that we could not ask the Legislature for au- 
thoiity to divide the city into a certain number of 
wards, not less than twenty-four nor more than 
thirty six, so that we might leave the question of 
the exact number to be determined hereafter, 
when we come ' to consider this whole matter, 
which will come up in the new charter, and when 
we shall have new light upon it. It is rather pre- 
mature now, it seems to me, to say just how many 
wards and how many Councilmen we shall 
have. If we are to have two members from 
each ward, and have thirtv-six wards, it 
strikes me that we shall have a larger Coun- 
cil than nowj while if we have more annex- 
ation — which is quite probable in the next few 
years — the number would be still larger. It did 
not occur to me that it would not be practicable 
for the Legislature to authorize the city to divide 
the city into a number of wards nor exceeding 
thirty -six, or less than twenty-four, and leave the 
question of representation to be determined here- 
after. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 4— In reply to the inquiry 
of the gentleman from Ward 6 I have to say that 
I have made some investigation of the charters of 
cities in thi« Commonwealth, and it seems to be 
th=, invariable rule for the Legislature to deter- 
mine the number of wards in the charter. In fact 
the law under which we proceed to redistrict the 
city and rearrange the boundaries of the wards ex- 
pressly states that in no case shall the city lay out 
more wards than are allotted to it; by its charter. 
For that reason it seems hardly probably that the 
Legislature will abandon a universal practice and 
grant the city of Boston at this time a shifting- 
limit from twenty-four to thirty-six, when its 
policy has heretofore been to fix the number of 
ward's at what seems proper and to sta^nd by it. 
Of course it is within the bounds of possibility 
that the Legislature will do it; but I can see no 
reason why they would. I can see no argument 
for their changing an established rule. The Legis- 
lature may say, "You don't know your own minds : 
we will exercise the power for you." I am not 
awaie that there is any matter of greater impor- 
tance than this pressing upon us now. If 
we do not vote upon it tonight we can postpone it 
till the next meeting and discuss it then. As to the 



FEBRUARY 2 5, 1875 



90 



idea that we might postpone it till the new char- 
ter comes up, I have this much to say: We are 
living at present under the old charter, and it is 
the opinion of miny gentlemen listening to me at 
this moment that we shall continue to live under 
that charter for some years to come. It is not 
wise to consider that the new charter will be 
adopted within the next two months by both the 
city of Boston and the Legislature; and without 
appealing to the Legislature we cannot have more 
Wan twenty-one wards. In fact there is consid- 
erable legal difficulty in saying we can have more 
than sixteen wards, and each waid must have four 
Councilmen and six School Committeemen. 
However great a blessing the new charter 
will be, and however certain the committee may 
be of its adoption by the city and Legislature, still 
I cannot think but that they will admit that we 
have a duty to perform in this matter, and that 
we should not neglect it. Let us discharge this 
present duty, and when the new charter comes up 
we can discuss it, a.od by disposing of this topic 
now we shall be saved the necessity of acting 
upon it then. For the reasons, then, that I do not 
think the Legislature will give us the opportunity, 
and that it is an obvious duty to consider the mat- 
ter now, I hope that action will not be postponed 
till the new charter is reported on. 

Mi. Crocker of Ward 6- My only question was 
whether it is necessary to determine the number 
of wards. The gentleman says the number of 
wards is fixed in other city charters. It is true 
that in the old charter the number of wards was 
fixed at twelve, and stood at thai ; but in this case 
there.i* a particular reason why -• e are not pre- 
pared to act. We can say to the Legislature, " We 
are going to consider the whole question, acd are 
not now prepared to say whether the number of 
wards shall be twenty-four or thirty-six; we want 
a little time to think about ii." The Legislature 
does not care whether we divide Boston into twen- 
ty-four or thirty wards, and it does not occur to 
me why they would insist upon our having twenty 
or thirty-six. It seems to me to be a matter of 
perfect indifference to them. I foretell them that 
we have some good reason, and would like to have 
this matter left open, so that it may have a mar- 
gin of from twenty-four to thirty-six. I do not 
see any reason why it should cot be done. 

Mr. Peabody of Ward 9 — As I understand it the 
committee have fixed upon thirty-six as the out- 
side limit of the number of waids — making that 
their outside preference. It occurs to me that 
possibly some of the Council would prefer — as it 
seems to me" I should— to vote first upon the 
smaller number of wards, and if that does not 
rceet with approbation, then we can vote for 
the larger number. In order to meet that desire, 
if it exists in the Council, I move t^ strike out the 
word "six," which would reduce the number of 
wards to thirty. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 4—1 should like the opin- 
ion of the Chair as to the method in which that 
amendment will be put, as it is virrually substi- 
tuting one number for another, aud I suppo-e the 
larger number is to be voted upon first. 

The President — Under the rule the larger num- 
ber would be in order to be voted upon first. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6— If I remember correct- 
ly, the order as it came originally from the com- 
mittee limited the number of waids to thirty, 
and the change from thirty to thirty-six was made 
by the gentleman [Mr. Whitmore] who introduced 
this order. If I am not right I would like to 
be corrected by the gentleman. The origi- 
nal order to request the Mayor to petition 
the Legislature was for a number of wards 
not exceeding thirty, and beyond that we have 
had no expression of<-the views of the com- 
mittee excepting the opinion given by the gentle- 
man from Ward 4, at the last meeting of the 
Council, ivhen he said, if I remember correctlv, 
that all the committee could report would be 
either twenty wards, with three members each, or 
thitty wards, with two members each. Consider- 
ing that that would be substantially the report of 
tne committee, who would leave us the alternative 
of determining whether the number should be 
twenty or thirty, I withdiew the motion I made to 
refer the order to the committee and moved its 
special assignment for tonight. I do not intend, 
Mr. President, to say anything upon the subject 
of the number ot wards, tor really — to express it 
pethaps forcibly, but not elegantly— I feel that I 
am rather in a muddle in reaard to it. But, with- 
out having matured the subject, I feel that the 
outside limit should be thirty wards, and that we 
should then have a I ufficientty laige Council and 



School Committee if we had two members from 
each ward. 

Mr. Fitzgerald of Ward 7—1 hope, sir, that this . 
matter will be fully discussed here before we pass 
this order. I have some views on this subject 
which I stated when it was discussed at length in 
the committee on the new charter. "Under our 
ward system, as it exists today, we elect four 
membeis of the Council and six of the school 
board, and three of the Legislature in the greater 
number of wards; and v. e have a caucus to nomi- 
nate the whole of them. What is the consequence 
of all this? Under this system, by which four 
members are elected to this branch, six to the 
School Committee and three to the Legislature, 
you have a small room in which to crowd the 
30,000 inhabitants of a waid; and under the 
caucus system you nominate four or three men 
for each body, one or two of whom maybe good, 
and the othsrs indiffeiently so; they are all put 
upon one ticket, the strong n>en on which carry the 
weak men through and elect them. Now, sir, I 
say that if there is a necessity for change you 
should arrange the wards of this city so as to 
make a compact little ward of each, where the 
people will know each other and can canvass the 
chat acter and capability of every man, and the 
number elected from each ward should be so 
small that if an unfit man is nominated a split 
ticket will defeat him. If every candidate has to 
stand on his own bottom the men of both parties 
will be atte tive to the persons whom they select 
for office, and the best men will be elected to go 
to each and every one ot the branches of the 
Government. On that account I am in favor of 
small wards in our city. I think that thirty-six 
wards are none too few. I do not believe in re- 
ducing the number in the popular branch 
here. My experience has been that the larger 
you make one branch ot a legislative body, the 
better protection there is against bad legislation ; 
and the smaller you make one branch, the easier 
it is to log-roll and carry thiougb jobs. I believe 
in having this branch of the Council reasonably 
large, and if we would elect one Councilman from 
fojty-eight or fifty warns it would be better. But 
I believe we shouhl so divide the city as to- elect 
not more than two fiom each ward, leaving the 
whole number in the Council and School Board 
the same as now. If you increase the number of 
wards and elect a smaller number from each, vou 
will secure better men. For that reason, I am in 
favor of thirty-six wards. We might petition the 
Legislature to divide the ci*y into not le^s than 
thirty-six wards, nor more than forty- eight, but I 
am opposed to putting it down to twenty-tour. 
With those convictions, sir, I shall vote for the 
order of the gentleman from Ward 4, fixing the 
wards at thirty-sis. 

Mr. Train of Ward 13— As it is getting late, and 
as we have had some ideas advanced which are 
certainly new to me, I move that further con- 
sideration of the subject be specially assigned to 
next Thursday evening at 8y 2 o'clock, and then I 
think we shall be ready to vote upon it. 

Mr. Whitmore of Ward 4 — I wish to make an 
explanation in replyjto the inquiry made by the 
gentlemau from Ward 6, as I would like to have it 
go upon record at this time. The committee 
voted o instruct their chaiiman to report two 
propositions to the Board of Aldermen, viz., chat 
the May«r should petition for l.-ave to divide the 
city into wards not exceeding thirty, the 
number to be fixed hereafter; also for 
two members of the Council and School 
Committee from each ward. That report 
will be found upon the records of the Al- 
dermen and in the remarks of Alderman Quincy. 
The Aldermen passed upon the first part of the 
order, and it came down here and we concurred in 
it, and the petition has been sent in. I wish it to 
he distinctly understood that the change to thirty- 
six is made on my own responsibility. 

The order was specially assigned for next. Thurs- 
day evening at half-past eight o'clock. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

By Mr. Thacber of Ward 15— Petitions of Mar- 
tin Hayes, foi extension of time in which to build 
on land on Fourth street, and Alfred Newhall, 
for extension of time in which to build on lot on 
Albany street. Severally leferred to the Joint 
Committee on Public Lands. Sent up. 

LABORATORY FOR ROXBURY HIGH SCHOOL. 

Mr. Psgeof Waid 9 submitted a leport from 
Committee on Public Instruction, on request vf 
School Committee, recommending the passage of 
the following: 



91 



COMMON COUNCIL 



Ordered, 'that the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authoiized to fit up a vacant room in the 
basement of the Roxbury High School as a labora- 
tory ; the expense to be chargedgto the appropria- 
tion for Schoolhouses, Public Buildings. 

Read once. 

SEWBUET STKEET PRIMARY SCHOOLHOUSE. 

Mr. Burditt of Ward 16 submitted the following 
(City Doc. No. 31): 

The Committee on Public Buildings beg leave to 
represent that an additional appropriation is re- 
quired for the primary tschoolhouse, Ward 9, be- 
fore che same can be put under contract. Ihe ap- 
propriation, as made by the City Council last year, 
for building was ,$40,000, jpioviding for a build- 
ing of six rooms, as per request of Committee on 
Pu'clic Instruction. Plans -were prepared, fur- 
nishing the accommodation as desired, but failed 
of an approval by said committee. Since then 
more school accommodations have been demand- 
ed in that neighborhood, and plans have been pre- 
pared for a building containing nine rooms, in 
place of six, which have been approved by the 
Committee on Public Instruction; hence, Llie in- 
crease in cost. 

Estimates have bPen received for doing the 
work, and it is found that an additional appropri- 
ation will be required of $5,000. before contracts 
can be awarded and work commenced. 
Statement of Appropriation. 
Appropriation for primary schoolhousc, New- 
bury street $40,000.00 

Expended for plans 500.00 

Unexpended balance $39,500.00 

Additional appropriation required 5,003.00 

$44,500.00 
They would, therefore, respectfully request an 
additional appropriation for primary schoolhouse, 
Newbury street, of $5000. 

For the committee 

Charles A. Burditt, Charman. 



Referred to Committee on Einance. Sent 
down. 

UNION OF MYSTIC AND COCHITUATE WATER 
BOARDS. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6, for the Committee on 
Ordinances, who were requested to consider and 
report, if they deem expedient, an ordinance to 
unite the Mystic and Cochituate water boards, 
submitted a report recommending the passage of 
the following: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to petition the General Court, now in session, 
for the passage ot an act in amendment ol chap- 
ter 179 of the acts of the year 1874, so that the 
Boston Water Board, when established as pio- 
vided theiein, may be empowered by the City 
Council to act as agent of the city in doing those 
thiogs which the city is now authorized to do in 
relation to the making of lands, water rights and 
other property and the establishment and main- 
tenance of works and appliances for supplying the 
city of Boston and other cities and towns with 
pure water. 

Read twice and passed. Sent down. 

BETTERMENTS ON NORTHAMPTON-STREET DIS- 
TRICT. 

Mr. Train of Ward 13, from the Joint Special 
Committee on Northampton-street District, sub- 
mitted the following: 

Ordered, That in the settlement of damages 
with the owners of estates parts of which have 
been taken during the year 1874, for the layingout 
or extension of Thorndike street, East Lenox 
street, or Hunneman street, the Joint Special 
Committee on the Northampton-street District be 
authorized to assume any betterment growing out 
of said laying out or extension that may be justly 
chargeable to such estates. 

Ordered to a second reading. 

On motion of Mr. Burditt of Ward 16, the Coun- 
cil adjourned. 



92 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

MARCH 1, 1875. 



Regular weekly meeting at four o'clock P. M., 
Alderman Clark, Chairman, presiding. 

JURORS DRAWN. 

Three grand jurors were drawn for the March 
term of the United States District Court. 

EXECUTIVE NOMINATIONS CONFIRMED. 

Commissioner on Cambridge Bridges — Frederic 
"W. Lincoln. 

Special Police Officers — Robert B. Graham, 
Home for Little Wanderers, Baldwin place; "Wil- 
liam H. Flint, Traders' National Bank. 

Police Officer— Charles E. Bullard. 

Measurer of Wood and Bark — Edward Seaver. 

PETITIONS, ETC., REFERRED. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Board. H. A. Wetherbee, for leave to occupy a 
new wooden stable for one horse on Shawmut 
avenue, No. 1293. 

Jolm Roche, for leave to occupy a new woodeis 
stable for three horses between Dorchester ave- 
nue, Pleasant and Creek streets. 

To the Committee on Bridges. Proposition by 
the Boston & Lowell Railroad Company and 
Mystic River Corporation, for filling the flats 
Kinder Chelsea Bridge before the improvements 
bow in progress are completed. 

To the Committee on Servers. Hannah Dudley, 
for abatement or postponement of assessment for 
sewerage on Centre street. 

To the Committee on Licenses. William A. Mad- 
dox et al., for license as auctioneers. 

To the Committee on Paving. Bridget McCaw- 
ley, for abatement of assessment for a sidewalk 
on Bolton street. 

John E. Blakemore et al., that Ashland street, 
Ward 17, be put in order. 

Samuel H. Russell, trustee, to be paid damages 
for change of grade of Milk street. 

William B. Hewitt, for leave to close Ohio street 
to public travel. 

Massachusetts -General Hospital and Ro«ve 
Brothers, to be paid for damages for change of 
grade of Washington street. 

John Gormley, Orsamus Nute, Albion J. Tuttle, 
for leave to sprinkle certain streets in this city. 

A. Loring, that Spring-park avenue,Ward 17, be 
put in order. 

Frank C. Pratt, to be paid for grade damages on 
Weston street. 

To the Joint Special Committee on the North- 
ampton-street District. Notice from John E. 
Fitzgerald, of dissatisfaction with the ass9ssment 
of the expense for raising the grade of his estate, 
42 Prescott place, and surrender of said estate. 

METROPOLITAN RAILROAD. 

A petition was received from the Metropolitan 
Railroad for the right to lay an additional track 
in Washington street from Temple place to Milk 
street; in Milk street from Washington street to 
Devonshire street; in Devonshire street from 
.Milk street to State street ; across State street to 
New Devonshire street, and in Ntw Devonshire 
street to connect with the track of the Middlesex 
Railroad now laid in New Washington street, with 
suitable turnouts, curves and connections. And 
for the right to construct a curve track to connect 
the southerly track on Hanover street with the 
track of Middlesex Railroad on New Washington 
street. Also for a track in Federal street, begin- 
ning at a point near the Boston, Hartford & Erie 
Railroad station, across Summer street, and 
through Federal street to Milk street, thence 
through Milk street to Devonshire street to con- 
nect with the track petitioned for in Devonshire 
street, with suitable turnouts, curves and connec- 
tions. 

Referred to Committee on Paving. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order to allow J. Arthur Peck to erect a wooden 
building on wharf of the Boston & Lowell Rail- 
road Company in Charlestown. Passed. 

Order to allow the sum of $2000 for clerical as- 
sistance in office of Inspector of Buildings. 
Passed. 

Severally sent down. 



Order to pay Robert McDevitt and Thomas Ha- 
ney $1009.12, for Bowdoin-street damages, Ward 
16. Passed. 

RENUMBERING OF WASHINGTON STREET. 

The order for the Superintendent of Streets to 
renumber Washington street, commencing at 
Haymarket square and continuing through Rox- 
bury to West Roxbury, was considered under the 
head of unfinished business. 

The Chairman read a remonstrance, signed by 
Charles J. Eaton and sixty others, owners and oc- 
eupants of estates on the west side of Washington 
street between Dover street and Blackstone 
square, "the most of whom have only recently 
seen the last of the expense and great and long- 
continued confusion and annoyance consequent 
upon one renumbering of the street" ; also a re- 
monstrance against the renumbering signed by 
Carter, Harris & Hawley and a hundred or more 
other owners and occupants of stores on Wash- 
ington street seuth of Corn hill. 

The order was recommitted and the remon- 
strance referred to the Committee on Paving, on 
motion of Alderman Worthington, with the re- 
quest that thty give all parties interested a hear- 
ing. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petitions of Alfred Newhall and Martin Hayes, 
and request of Committee on Public Buildings for 
an additional appropriation of $5000 for the erec- 
tion of a primary seboolbouse on Newbury street, 
(City Doc. No. 31). Severally referred. 

Order to authorize the Committee on the North- 
ampton-street District, in settlement of damages 
for the new streets laid out on said territory, to 
assume any betterments connected theiewith. 
Passed. 

UNION OF THE WATER BOARDS. 

An order, appended to a report of the Commit- 
tee on Ordinances, for the Mayor to petition the 
Legislature for an act amending the act author- 
izing the establishing the Boston Water Board, so 
that said board, when established, may be em- 
powered to act as the agent of the City Council in 
taking lands, water rights, etc., for extension of 
water works, came from the Council for concur- 
rence. 

Alderman Worthington— It seems to me that we 
are asking the Legislature to confer upon a com- 
mission of three or five or eight a power that 
should remain entirely in the hands of the City 
Government of Boston. The seizing of water 
rights, the taking of land and buildings, and the 
building of conduits are matters of immense 
importance to the city. Many believe the 
present scheme will cost from $10,000,000 to $12,- 
000,000; I have no doubt it will cost $10,000,000: 
and are we going to commit to a commission of 
this Government the final decision of such an im- 
portant matter? We should not petition the Legis- 
lature for any power that will take from the City 
Council the right to act upon such a question ; 
we should not petition to have that power con- 
ferred by the Legislature upon any committee 
or board, but it should be retained in the City 
Council, wrio are abundantly able to judge of it. 
It is of such importance that every member of 
this Bond of Aldermen should inform himself, 
and no one should vote upon it without getting as 
much information as he would if he were one of 
the commission. I therefore hope tnat the order 
will not pass, but that the right will remain with 
the City Government as it is now, and not be con- 
ferred upon any committee or commission to 
make selections of land and water rights and make 
appropriations necessary for this work. 

Alderman Quincy— I agree fully with the Alder- 
man, but I think I can explain to him that this ac- 
tion is in restriction of the power of the Water 
Board and an enlargement of the power of the 
City Council. His understanding of the order, as 
it reads, is very natural, as it would seem that it is 
intended to give more power to a certain board 
which ii is proposed to create, — whereas it is in- , 
tended tc limit their power and make it certain 
that they are to act as the agents, when so instruct- 
ed by the City Government. The order under which 
this report in Bart is offered reads as follows: 

"Ordered, That the Committee on Ordinances 
be requested to consider and report, if deemed ex- 
pedient, an ordinance to unite the Cochituate and 
Mystic water boards." 

la the absence of any instructions as to what 
sort of an ordinance should be reported or what 
sort of a union recommended, the committee re- 
garded the whole subject as before them, presum- 
ing that if the Council had desired to instruct 



MARCH 1, 187 5 



93 



them on any particular point, such as numbers, 
tenure of office, mode of. appointment or election, 
payment or non-payment, they would have clone 
so. In this view and in order to a propei under- 
standing of the situa tion those of the committee 
who are new members, including the chairman, 
thought it their duty to sturly the records in oiuer 
to understand the reason of ihe last year's failure 
of trie attempt to unite these two boards, and 
this is what we found: February 9, 1874, the 
chairman or the Water Committee offered an 
order, "That the Joint Standing Committee on 
Water he requested to consider and report 
upon the expediencv of providing hy ordinance 
for the estahli: huieot of a single board to exer- 
cise ihs powers now vested in the Cochituate aud 
Mystic water boards, the members of which shall 
be appointed hy the Mayor, with the approval of 
the City Council, and compensated for their ser- 
vices." That ordei was passed Feb. 1G, and passed 
in the Council Feb. 19. On this order the commit- 
tee reported jn part March 9, reciting that a 
change is desirable to secure economy and effi- 
ciency, and without attempting then to designate 
the form of the organization, recommended that 
his Honor pt- cition the General Court "for an act to 
enable the City Council of Boston to estaolish a 
water board, and tocouler upon it authority to 
exercise all or any of the powers, now vested by 
statute and ordinance in the Cochituate Water 
Board and the Mystic Water Board, or in die City 
Council, in relation to the supply and distri- 
bution of pure water." That oicler was 
passed in this Board March 9, and in the 
Council March 12 On April 16 the Water Commit- 
tee reported that an act had been passed and rec- 
ommended an ordinance, under the same which 
was referred to the Committee on Ordinances the 
same day without instructions. On May 18 that 
committee made two reports — the majority that 
the ordinance ought to pass in a new draft, the 
minority that it ought not to pass. [City Docs. 53 
and 54.] After long debates the ordinance as re- 
ported by the majority was passed in the upper 
branch, June 29, but was rejected in the Common 
Council July 16, and a motion to reconsider laid 
upon the table. Upon an attentive purusal 
■of the debates it appeared that apart 
from the general objections to paid and ap- 
pointed boards the principal objecti in to 
an organization under this act lay in the 
phraseology of the second clause of the second 
paragraph of the first section, under which it was 
claimed that the proposed board was given, as it 
were, a power of attorney to do all that the 
City Council may by law do in this matter without 
further instructions. The City Solicitor gave his 
official opinion that such was not the construction 
of the act, and that the proposed board would be 
constituted an ?gent simply to take instructions 
and not to act without them. But it appealed 
that Mr. Henry W. Paine and other distinguished 
lawyers were of a different opinion, and in fact, 
on reading the two clauses of this paragraph a 
striking difference appears, which it might cer- 
tainly be argued implied an intention to grant 
more extensive powers by the second than by the 
first clause. The first clause reads. "The said board 
may be empowered by said City Council" to do so 
and so, and the second clause contains "and is also 
empowered to act as the agent of the city" in 
doing all things which the city may do in relation 
to taking lands, etc. Now it is evident that had the 
words "maij be" been used in both clauses this 
objection that the agent was set above the prin- 
cipal would fall to the ground. And the com- 
mittee are informed that they were so used in the 
act as drafted and reported, Cut that the change 
was made in the committee on bills in the third 
reading for no particular reason except for 
brevity. Now the proposed order simply con- 
templates a restoration of the words "may be" of 
the fiist draft in place of the word "is," after 
which the committee will go on to consider the 
expediency of organizing under the act so amend- 
ed, and they have alreidy appointed a hearing for 
gentlemen who desire to oppose the same. The 
passage of this order binds us to nothing what- 
ever, but puts the act in such a condition that if 
the City Council should conclude to organize un- 
der it, we may do so safely. 

Alderman Harris — No matter whether such leg- 
islation is necessary or desirable, I cannot but 
express my dissatisfaction at the order now before 
us— emanating as it does from the committee of 
whom the learned Alderman from Ward 4 is chair- 
man. I am somewhat surprised that it should 
have been reported. It will be remembered that 



the subject referred to the committee was simply 
to consider the expediency of unitins: the Cochit- 
uate and Mystic boards. Now my point, Mr. 
Chairman, is this, viz., that a distinct specific sub- 
ject was referred to the committee, which seems 
to be ignored, for they report an order asking that 
his Honor the Mayor maybe authorized to peti- 
tion the Legislature to amend one of the statutes 
— a matter foieign to what was committed to them 
to consider. Here there seems to be a new de- 
parture. Therefore I trust the order will not pass, 
and I shall vote against it. 

Alderman Quincy— We were undoubtedly or- 
dered to consider and report, if deemed expedient, 
an ordinance to unite the two boards, and it 
would have been perfectly competent for the City 
Council to instruct us not to report an ordinance 
under an existing statute which we found on the 
statute book. But in considering the whole mat- 
ter we found an ordinance upo.s the records con- 
templating such a union of these two boards, and 
we supposed we had a right to consider it. If it 
was intended for us to ignore that act altogether 
it would have been perfectly competent for the 
City Council to instruct us. " In the absence of 
such instructions we considered that the whole 
matter wa; before us, ind I think we should have 
erred in our duty if we had ignored the proceed- 
ings of last year. 

Alderman Prescott moved that the order be 
laid on the table. 

Lost hy a rising vote — 4 for, 7 against — and the 
order then passed in concurrence. 

COMMUNICATIONS FROM CITY OFFICERS. 

City Messenger. Communication transmitting 
notice of appointment of Foster M. Spurr as first 
assistant, and Henry B. Lotts as second assistant, 
for the ensuing year. Appointments confirmed. 
Sent down. 

Resignation. The following was received, read 
and referred to the joint specKl committee to 
nominate candidates for overseers of the poor, 
and sent down. 

Boston, Feb. 27, 1875. 

Hon. Samuel C. Cobb, Mayor of Boston : Dear 
Sir — I hereby resign my place as an Overseer of 
the Poor. The law of 1873 requres me to do this 
or hazard my own interest and tnat of my asso- 
ciates in business. I am grateful to the several 
City Councils who have honored me by so of ten 
electing me to an office of so many responsible 
and delicate duties. While I regret, very much, 
the severing of my official relations with the gen- 
tlemen with whom I have been associated so long 
and sopleasantly , and whoml esteem for their own 
worth, and for the intelligent and faithful manner 
in which they have devoted their time and talents 
to the duties of their office, I hope the provision 
for the appointment of Overseers of the Poor, as 
recommended by the commission to revise the 
city charter, will be retained, as that seems to 
offer the surest guarantee that through its opera- 
tion the best men will be secured to deal with one 
of the most difficult and important questions 
likely to arise among municipal affairs. 
Very respectfully, 

Joseph Buckley, 
steam engine. 

A petition was received from W. & J. Strider, 
for leave to locate and use a steam engine and 
boiler at 1755 Washington street, and an order 
was passed for a hearing thereon to all parties 
objecting, on Monday, March 22, at four o'clock 
P. M. 

WEIGHERS AND INSPECTORS OF LIGHTERS. 

Alderman Harris submitted a report from the 
joint special committee to nominate candidates 
for Weighers and Inspectors of Lighters, recom- 
mending the election of the following named: 
Edward Hatch, inspector in chief; John Kenney, 
John J. Caddigan, John C. Brooks, assistant in- 
spectors. 

The report was accepted, and on motion of Al- 
derman Harris the Board proceeded to an elec- 
tion. Aldermen Harris and Pope were appointed 
a committee to collect ana count votes. They 
reported- 
Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary for a choice 7 

Edward Hatch had 12 

John Kenney 11 

Joh2 J. Caddigan 9 

John C. Brooks 9 

Charles C. Davis 5 

John Coughlin l 

And Messrs. Hatch, Kenney, Caddigan and Biooks 
were declared elected. Sent down. 



94 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



STREET DAMAGES. 

Alderman Harris, for the Committee on Streets 
on the part of the Board, submitted orders to pay 
for street damages as follows: 

Sarah P. Tucker, $3458.10, for land taken in 
name of James Tucker, 2d, by widening of Bow- 
doin street. 

Lucy II. Spooner, $5870, for land taken, etc., by 
extension of Columbus avenue to Park squaie,an'd 
also for 'mange of grade of said avenue. 

Jeffrey Richardson, $14,292.92, for land taken, 
etc., by extension of Columbus avenue to Park 
square and for change in gjade of said avenue. 

George H. Pike, $33.25, for land taken, etc., by 
extension of West Cottage street. 

Ann C. G y, $1776, for land taken, etc., by ex- 
temiou of West Cottage street. 

William R. Gs y, $2000, for land taken, etc., by 
extension of West Cottage street. 

Severally read once. 

DAMAGES FOE SEWER. 

Alderman Harris, lor the Committee on Sewers 
submitted the following: 

Order to pay Betsey J. Pope $221.90 for land 
taken and damages occasioned b.y the construc- 
tion of a sewer "between Dudley and Quincy 
streets, long the valley of the brook which was 
formerly tbe division between Roxbury a id Dor- 
chester," and for the diversion of the waters of 
said brook throueh said sewer, byaiesolve and 
order of the Bo id of Allernien Aug. 19, 1874. 

Read twice and passed. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Bigelow, for the Committee on 
Licenses, submitted reports as follows: 

Intelligence Ufflces Licensed — Diana C. Lang, 69 
Warrenton street; George Brown, 11 Montgomery 
place (transfeired from Warren M. Baker). 

Pawnbroker Licensed— Charles E. Dole, 10 Port- 
land street. 

Minors' Applications Granted— Sixteen news- 
boys. 

Auctioneer Licensed— Albert S. Eaton, 72 North- 
ampton street. 

Wagon Licesise Granted— Alonzo G. Stockwell, 
18 Eustis street. 

Hack License Granted— Cbailes N. Dean, 40 
Water street. 

Severally accepted. 

ACCOUNTS OF COLLECTORS TO BE EXAMINED. 

Aldeimau Bigelow offered the following: 
Ordered. That the Committee on the Treasury 
Department on the part of the Board o? Alder- 
men be authorized and directed to examine the 
accounts of the deputy collectors of Taxes con- 
nected with the City Treasurer's office; and also 
the accounts of the collectors who became con- 
nected with said office by the annexation of ad- 
joining cities and towns. 
Read twice and passed. 

WIDENING SCHOOL STREET. 

The following was received: 

To the Honorable City Councd— The Board of 
Street Commissioners have received a petition for 
the widening of School street. As the expense 
would be great, and as legislation is necessary to 
enable the city to erter upon the church estate at 
the corner of Tremont street — under the only 
practicable method of widening the street, upon 
its northerly side — the commissioners respect- 
fully ask for the sense of your honorable body 
upon the present expediency of the improvement, 
before devoting their time and labor to the pi.epa- 
ration of the necessary orders i;nd estimates to be 
sent to you for approval. 

For the Boa id of Street Commissioners, 

Newton Talbot, Chairman. 

The Chairman— Is it the pleasure of the Board 
to refer the communication to the Joint Commit- 
tee on Streets ? 

Alderman Worthiugton— If I am not mistaken 
that matter has already been before a portion of 
the Committee on Street-!. I think it is the wish 
of the Street Commissioners to know whetner this 
Board of Aldermen are desirous of spending 
money this year to widen School street. It is a 
very easy matter for the commissioners to go on 
and make calculations of the value of land and 
arrange for the widening of School street, but I 
think they wish the Board of Aldermen to express 
their preference whether or not they desire it to 
be done this year. If it is desirable to go on 
spending money for widening streets as we have 
heretofore, the Board of Street Commissioners 
wish to know that. That is the point they wish to 



learn, and I hope the Aldermen will express their 
opinions, that the Joint Committee on Streets may 
know what the wishes of the Board are in regard 
to it. 

Alderman Power — I must confess that I do not 
quite understand this. I wa? under the impres- 
sion that the Street Commissioners were appoint- 
ed for the express purpose of considering these 
matters and to recommend what, in their judg- 
ment, it wa« expedient for the City Council to do. 
I cannot understand why they have any diead of 
assuming the responsibility of recommending the 
widening or giving tne petitioners leave to with- 
draw. The matter comes before us in rather an 
irregular way . 1 do not remember that a docu- 
ment ever came from them in that » ay bef oi e. I 
have always been under the impression that it was 
their expre-s business to consider the laying out 
and widening of streets, and it seems to me that 
they should go into this matter first, — they have 
fully as much time as this Boarn, — as they were 
selected and paid for that purpose. They should 
consider it and take the responsibility of either 
recommending that the work be aone or giving 
the petitioners leave to withdraw. 

Alderman Worthington — The Street Commis- 
sioners are perfectly willing to take the responsi- 
bility of recommending it, but they desire some 
expression from this Board of Aldermen as a part 
of the City Government, because you will bear in 
mind that the city of Boston now have no power 
to widen this street. Before we can do it we must 
obtain authority from the Legislature to take the 
land on the burying ground and move the church. 
It is idle for the Street Commissioners to make 
calculations and recommend that this City Gov- 
ernment petition the Legislature for that power 
if it is not the wish of the city to spend the money 
thisyeai. It will cost some four or five hundred 
thousand doJlatsto widen School street from Wash- 
ington street to Tremont strest, and the commis- 
sioners are entirely right in desiring to know what 
the wish of this Board is. The Mayor, in his in augu- 
ral recommended economy, and we are all endeav- 
oring to practise economy in making up the esti- 
mates for the coming financial year. Now comes 
this question, and the commissioners waut an ex- 
pression of opinion from this Board. Will this 
Board request them to lay out and widen 
streets as they have done heretofore? O*. do tl-ey 
want to practise economy? That is what is de- 
sired here today, and I think it is right and proper 
that they should have an expression of opinion 
from this Board of Aldermen. The commissioners 
have no hesitation in taking the responsibility, 
but it is idle for them to expend their time — anct 
they have a great deal to do— if nothing will come 
of it. If it is the intention of this Board to stop 
spending money in widening streets, it is idle for 
the commissioners to go on. Tney want the Hoard 
of Alderman to understand that we must petition 
the Legislature for authority to widen School 
street before it is done. 

Alderman Power— It seems to me that ev_n in 
that case the Sueet Commissioners should first 
give us a statement of the facts— what che ex- 
pense will be, and how much will be the cost of 
carrying ouc this project. After going all over 
the ground it will then be perfectly compete tit for 
them either to recommend that the thing should 
or should not be done. It is not possible for this 
Board to decide the matter when they don't know 
what the cost will be. They might, perhaps, think 
it economy to do it now, after some statement of 
the facts in the case,— and they might not. My 
notion of it is that it is not economy or prudence 
for the city to do it this year ; still, I don't know 
but that my mmd might be changed when I see a 
statement of just what it will cost to make tlis 
improvement. 

Alderman Worthington — We now have the opin- 
ion of one Alderman that it is not expedient to 
make this improvement this year. I hope other 
Aldermen will express their opinions in this way. 
I stated when I was up that it would cost four or 
five hum red thousand dollars. That is enough 
for us to know today, and there is not an Alder- 
man here toaay, ?/ho cannot express his opiuion 
whether or Mot we should go on and spend four 
or five hundred thousaud dollars to widen School 
street. That is all the commissioners ask. If you 
say economy, they will stop; if you mean go on, 
you will pass an order petitioning the Legislature 
for authority. 

Alderman O'Brien — I do not feel that I can vote 
intelligently upon this subject. I want more in- 
formation from the Street Commissioners. I d o 
not take it fcr granted that the cost is to be $400 ,- 



MARCH 1, 1875 



95 



000 or $500,000 ; it may be $1,000,000. If they want 
us to vote intelligently upou the subject, let them 
give us information. ' For my part I shall vote 
against any street improvements, for the present, 
if they are to cost anything like $400,000 or $500,- 
000. 

Alderman Power— The Alderman from the High- 
land District says the Aldermen know all about it. 

1 don't know anything about it. There is a very 
large estate near the church and I don't know 
whether the city will have to pay for that; I don't 
know the quantity of land to be taken, 'or the value 
put upon the land by the owners, or the value of 
thb structures. I have an idea, but it might be 
$400,000 or $500,000, or, as :he gentleman just said, 
it might be $1,000,000. 

Alderman Wortbington— I hope the Aldermen 
viill express their opinions upon the subject. I 
don't want any equivocation. Let us stare right, 
at the Beginning of the year. 

Alderman Power — I want information upon this 
subject. As we cannot get it fiom the Street 
Cocumissiooers, and as we can get it from the 
Joint Committee on Streets, 1 have no objection 
to its Dsing ieierred to that committee. . 

Alderman Stebbins — I move as an amendment 
that the reference be with instructions to report 
an approximate estimate of what the cost of the 
imorovemeat will be. 

Alderman Wortbington— They state that it will 
be between four and five hundred thousand dol- 
lars. I think the commissioners have informed 
the Committee on Streets on the pait of this 
Board that that will be the expense. When you 
talk about taking the church, there is a legal ques- 
tion for the Legislature and the courts to settle ; 
when you go down further and look at the build- 
ings there, we know whether to go forward or 
not. Wa all know it will cost $400,000; the only 
question is, Are you ready to spend the money? 
Let uc have an opinion upon that, that we may 
know whether to go to the Legislature or not. 
The Joint Committee on Streets will consider it if 
you so desire ; but that does not give the inform- 
ation the commissioners desire. We can go to 
the commissioners and ask them to figure upon 
it, and it will take at least a foi might. If 
you are going to do anvthin- this year, 
say so today. They simply ask us to 
get the power. That I approve of. I ap- 
prove of getting from the Legislature all the pow- 
er that we can for the improvement of the ciiy. 
But w° want to know where we are. I speak as 
one of the Committee on Streets. I know what 
they will ask when they come together: Is it the 
intention of the City Council of Boston to widen 
School street this year? That is all the commis- 
sionets and the committee ask. Give us an -ex- 
pression of opinion as to your intention. 

Alderman Burrage — How can we express Our 
views by a vote on this question as it now stands 
before the Board? 

Alderman Worthington — If any one opposes do- 
ing anything this year, let him voce against refer- 
ring this communication to the Committee on- 
Streets; if that is done we shall all understand 
that it is not the wish of this Board to spend four 
or five hundred thousand dollars in widening 
School street. 

Alderman Quiney— I have no objection co ob- 
taining my information fiom the Street Commis- 
sioners, and if they have come here and asked us 
to help them make up their minds, I bave no ob- 
jection to sending it to one of our committees. I 
am prepared to vote either way, in order to obtain 
the information. 

Alderman Barrage — It seems to me that the 
correct way is to refer it, ano then have the ques- 
tion properly before us, as it is not so now, in 
my judgment. 

The amendment of Alderman Stebbins was 
adopted, and the communication was referred to 
the Joint Standing Committee on Streets, with in- 
struetiotjs to report an approximate estimate of 
the cost of the widening. Sent down. 

PAVING ORDERS. 

Alderman Power, for the Committee on Paving, 
submitted reports with the following orders: 

Order to pay James Parker $4327.44, for grade 
damages on his estate 16 to 22 Kilcy street; said 
sum to be charged to the Burnt District Loan. 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer be directed 
to abate the sidewalk assessment of seventeen 
dollars and ninety cents against the estate of 
heirs of Hardy Leach, No. 376 Chelsea street, said 
heirs being unable to pay the same. 

Ordered, That the sum of $87.72, assessed to 



David Kevins, Jr., for sidewalk on Winthrop 
street, Roxbury, be abated, and the same assess- 
ed to heirs of George Blackburn. 
Severally read once. 

PERMITS FOR STEAM ENGINES. 

Alderman Power, for the Committee on Steam 
Eugines, submitted reports on petitions previous- 
ly interred to them, recommending that permits 
to use stationary engines be granted to H. F. 
WV.etler, at 71 Lincoln street, and Boston Gas- 
light Company at the coiner of Snowhill and Hull 
streets. Severally accepted. 

THE PUBLIC PARK QUESTION. 

On motion of Alderman Prescott the Board pro- 
ceeded to consider the special assignment for Ave 
o'clock P.M., viz., Alderman Prescott's motion 
to reconsider the vote by which the amended or- 
der for the Mayor to petition the General Court 
for authority "co purchase or otherwise take 
land within the limits of the city" for the purpose 
of public parks was rejected. 

Tha order as rejected is as follows, with the 
amendments in brackets : 

Ordered , That his honor the Maj or be i equested 
to petition the Genual Court, now in session, for 
the passage of an act authorizing the city to pur- 
chase, or otherwise take, lands within the limits 
of the city for the purpose of laying out public 
parks, and also authorizing the assessment of 
betterments upon 'lie adjoining lands benefited 
by the establishment of such parks; [provided, 
however, that no expenditure shall b- authorized 
or made tor the purchase or improvement of any 
land exceeding in amounr the sum raised by taxa- 
tion and appropriated by the City Council for that 
purpose, and all money actually received by the 
city foi betterments assessed upon- adjoining 
lauds] ; [said act not to take effect unless ac- 
cepted by a majority of the legal vote.rs present, 
and voting thereon at meetings duly called for 
that put pose in the several wards.] 

Alderman Pre»cott — The only leason I can give 
the B®ard, Mr. Chairman, for asking to have this 
matter again opened and discussed, is i he impor- 
tance that I place upon it. Agitated and dis- 
cussed for the last five years, recommended ear- 
nestly in the two messages of his honor the pres- 
ent Major, and having received the thorough in- 
vestigation of an able commission appointed last 
year, it seems to me rhat it is a subject which we 
should not pass by until we have examined it in 
all its details. The first movement ever made by 
the citizens of Boston looking towards the estab- 
lishment of a public park or parks was in the 
autumn of 18G9; and inasmuch as the bold state- 
ment has been made and repeated that this whole 
subject of pa-ks 9? as urged by interested specula- 
tors to fill their own pockets at the expense of the 
treasury of the city, [ desire to call attention to 
the names which were presented to this Govern- 
ment in that autumn of 1869, asking for the con- 
sideration of the subject. All of the names I 
will not read, but some of them are as follows: 
Gardner Brewer & Co., John S. Wright & Co., 
Francis Skinner & Co., George C. Richardson & 
Co., Faulkner, Kimball & Co., Dale Brothers & 
Co., Leland, Allen & Bate 5 :, Kidder, Peabody & 
Co., Blake Brothers & Co., William F. Weld, 
Franklin Haven, Georgv. Tyler Bigelow, and many 
otheis of the same stamp. This petition was re- 
ferred to a committee of the City Council consist- 
ing of three Aldermen and five Councilmen. 
They gave public notice in the newspapers of the 
date of a hearing upon the ^ubjrct to all who 
favored and opposed the project. I have here, in 
City Document 123 of the year 1869, tne full report of 
the bearings before that committee. Many leading 
gentlemen of the city appeared before that com- 
mittee and gave strong reasons why, in their 
opinion, this matter of a public park deserved 
favorable consideration from the City Govern- 
ment. I will not lead the entire list, but among 
those who appeared were George B. Emerson, 
Hon. Marshall P. Wilder, George B. Upton, Uriel 
H. Crocker, James Haughton, Horace B. Sargent, 
Hon. E. H. Derby, George W. Messing^r and a 
great many others. I fail to And a single person 
appearing before that committee to remonstrate 
against the city of Boston taking such action. 
The committee reported in December of the same 
year, and as their report is so short I will read it: 

"In order to obtain a definite and unmistakable 
expression of the popular feeling upon such an 
important subject, the committee, immediately 
upon theii appointment, invited all persons inter- 
ested, either for or against the project, to appear 
and state their views. Two public' hearings" were 



96 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



given, which were attended by a large number, of 
prominent gentlemen; and a full opportunity was 
afforded to every individual who had anything to 
offer upon the subject. Naturally tae're were 
many differences of opinion in regard to location 
and the quantity of land required; but it was 
clearly shown by the views expressed before the 
committee, and the communications and com- 
ments in the daily press, that the people were in 
fdvor of some action on the part of the City (iov- 
ernment looking to th - establishment, a t an early 
day, of one large park or several small parks in 
Boston or the immtdi ate vicinity. Much informa- 
tion and. many valuable suggestions were fur- 
nished to the committee, which are presented 
herewith, with the recommendation that they be 
printed for the futuie use of the Government.' It 
seems to be admitted by all that, as the popula- 
tion of the city increases, the necessity or afford- 
ing some additional means for healthy recreation 
will increase with it, and finally make it impera- 
tive. If that is the case, the duty of the Govern- 
ment at the present time is clear. Authority 
should be obtained from the Legislature, without 
dela\ , to take land for the purpose, and as soon as 
a suitable location— one sufficiently accessible to 
be enjoyed by all classes of oui citizens — can be 
fixed upon the land sbo Id be stcured. The work 
of laying out and improving the giounds may 
properly be delayed to suit the convenience of the 
Government, or' for a better condition of the 
finances of the city; but there can hardly be a 
question that the land should be secuied as soon 
as practicable." 

The committee unanimously iecommei.de I, in 
accordance with these views, the passage of the 
following order : 

"Ordeied, That his Honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to petrcioa the General Court, at its next ses- 
sion, for tne patsa-.- of an aci authorizing the 
City Council of BostOi. to purchase, or otherwise 
take, lands in Boston ^r its vicinity for the pur- 
pose of laying out one large park, or several small 
parks, for the benefit of the people." 

When this order came into the Board of Alder- 
men on Dec. 20, 1869, it passed two readings 
without an opposing voice. It went down 1,0 
the Common Council on the 23d of the same 
month, and passed there without any opposition 
whatever, and was approved by the Mayor of the 
city, Dec. 24, 1869. In the beginning of the fol- 
lowing year, 1870, a commission was appointed, 
composed in part, I think, of members of the Gov- 
ernment and parties not members of the Govern 
ment. Hon. William Ga<ton, afterwards Mayor 
of the city, and now Governor of the State, was a 
member of that commission. They reported a bill 
to the Legislature asking that the autl ority to 
take la'd be gi anted. The bill was amended in 
several particulars in the interest of towns in the 
neighborhood of Boston who wished to realize the 
benefit of this improvement themselves. A pro- 
vision was put in that the act should not take ef- 
fect until two-thirds of the people should vote in 
favor of it — two-thirds of those voting — at the fol- 
lowing State election. It was also provided that 
there should be a general board or park commis- 
sion appointed, in part by the State and in part 
by the city, to carry out the provisions of the act. 
These features of the bill estranged many friends 
of a public park and deterred them from voting 
for it. Among others I take the liberty of men- 
tioning the name of Hon. Henry L. Pierce, 
afterwards Mayor of Boston, who, though 
strongly in favor of parks for the peo- 
ple, did not feel like appointing a com- 
mission ^is provided by the Legislature. Yet, 
notwithstanding all this, when it was submitted 
to the people on Nov. 19, 1870, the vote of the 
sixteen wards was as follows: la favor, 9233; 
against, 5916. Sixty-three out of every 100 vote is 
w ere in favor of the act, but it did not become a 
law, for it required 66% out of every 100 voters. 
Thirteen of the sixteen wards voted for the act, 
Wards 1, 12 and 16 voting against it. Those voting 
strongest m favor of it weie the wards which pay 
the largest taxes. The valuation of Boston in 
that year (1870), was $584,000,000; the valuation 
of the tnirteen wards voting in favor of 
this act was $534,000,000; the valuation of 
the three wards voting against it was only 
$50.000,000— so that ninety per cent, of the 
valuation of Boston voted in favor of accepting 
that act. The wards to which we are inclined to 
look for men of intelligence and character and 
high standing voted very strongly in favor of the 
act. Ward 4 went 601 for, 320 against; Ward 6, 
806 for, 228 against; Ward 8, 550 lor, 172 against; 



Ward 9, 623 for, 368 against; Ward 10, 794 for, 269 
against (I trust the Alderman from Ward 10 will 
remember these figures); Ward 11, 739 for, 382 
agaiost. 

Aldeiman Burrage — 1869 and 1874 are two differ- 
ent years. 

Alderman fresco tt— During the following year 
nothing was done in regard to the matter, in 
1871 ana 1872 Mr. Gaston was Mayor of the city. 
In the fall of 1872 came the disastrous conflagra- 
tion woich swept av/ay alaige portion of the bu.-i- 
ness part of the city. In 1873, when Mr. Pierce 
assumed the position of Mayor, the city was in no 
position, after such a calamity* to take hold of 
any such proposition; but in 1874, when hi^ hon- 
or the present Mayor was inaugurated, he dis- 
tinctly stated his views in regard to a park itj his 
inaugural address. The subject was reteued to a 
committee of the C;ty a Goverument, and eventually 
a commission, composed i-r part by members of 
the Government, aod some outside persons, was 
appointed, to whom this matter was leferred. 
They gave ihree public hearings m the month of 
June, and as the Alderman from Ward 12, in 
his lemarks, when this subject was first opened, 
stated that this w^s, meiely a scheme of land 
speculators, who were all the parties taking an in- 
terest in the matter, I have taken occasion to look 
at the reports of those meetings. The first meet- 
ing was held June 13, the second on the 17th and 
the third on the 20th. They were called for the 
large committee room, but the number in attend- 
ance was so large that they adjourned to the 
Common Council chamber. In looking over the 
reports of the hearings given in the newspapers 
of the day, I do not find that a single person went 
there to object. The hearings were "advertised; 
friends ami opponents of the measure were in- 
vited to these meetings to express their views. 
Inasmuch as the character of those who have 
interested thimselves in this enterprise has 
been called in question, I should like to direct the 
attention of the members ox the Board to the 
names of the parties v/ho appeared there: Uriel 
H. Crocker, B,. H. Dana, Jr , Edward Adams, Mr. 
Odiorne and others appeared at the first hearing. At 
the secona hearing the first peison who appeared 
was Thomas Hills, chaii man of the Board of As- 
sessors of the city of Boston ; E. S. Bernard, T. C. 
Amory, Horace B. Sargent, Mr. Horton, Otis 
Clapp, Alanson W. Be?rd, Kev. E. E. Hale and 
many others. I should not read the names of 
these gentlemen but that the character of those 
interested in providing breathing places for the 
health and i ornfoit of the people of this city of 
Boston has been brought in question. 

Alderman Harris — Are they all taxpayers of the 
city of Boston? 

Alderman Prescott— I think the Board must be 
aware that the names I have read are those of 
prominent citizens of Boston, and taxpayers. 
There can be no question about that. The re- 
mit of those deliberations was the presentation to 
the City Council of the report of the Park Com- 
mission, the statements in which I fearlessly as- 
sert cannot be denied or disputed. Its arguments 
are sound; it goes into the question of the present 
health of the city; it suggests as a remedy the 
establishment of open spaces or parks— or by 
whatever other name they may properly be 
called — for giving the people or this city 
fresh air and ventilation. They state facts 
in regard to the parks of other cities which 
lender it conclusive to my mind, that if 
Boston should embark upon anv such enter- 
prise as this, it would prove remunerative to the 
city, instead of being a burden to taxpayers. 
Much has been said — especially in the early part 
of this discussion — in regard to the present 
health ot the city of Boston. Statements and 
counter statements have been made; but of this 
I feel assured, that the health of the city of Bos- 
ton is not, what it should be, nor what it can be 
made with proper sewerage, with proper spaces 
left for the free circulation of pure air over the 
city; and uithout going into the statistics or ex- 
amining the statements made by the Alderman 
from Ward 12, and refuted, it seems to me, by the 
Alderman from Ward 6, I would call attention 
to some facts stated by the State Board of Health 
during the last four years, I qrote from the sec- 
ond annual report of that Board in 1871: 

"Looking now at the general death-rates for all 
ages, we see a very great disparity in the several 
districts, ranging from 5.7 (District 28), 9.1 (Dis- 
trict 41) and 9.8 (District 32), up to the enormous 
rate of 37.9 in a thousand in District 42. This lat- 
ter region is low, imperfectly drained, in parts 



M ARCH 



18 75. 



97 



densely peopled and full of nuisances which have 
been allowed to grow and fester unchecked by 
the city authorities. Stony Brook between Tre- 
uiont street a-:id the Providence Railroad, and also 
in tbe neighborhood of Paiker street, has beeu * 
source of di ease to all tbe dwellers in its vicinity. 
'Xue steacb f ornthts neighborhood h?s been olteu 
perceptible during the past -summer at the dis- 
tance of a mile. District 42 is also in the imme- 
diate neighborhood and under the influence of the 
sunken tract about Ruggles street, in District 37, 
on which water has been standing continually 
during tbe past hot summer. Fortunately the 
tract m question is hardly peopled as 5 et, although 
covered with new houses which must be raised , 
lik/i Church and Suffolk street?, at a vast ex- 
pense, most of which might have been saved if 
the health authorities of the city had done their 
r'uty. District 21 is next most fatal to lite. It is 
very densely peopled, and contains the worst ten- 
ement bouses in Boston. District 29, with its 
crowded and narrow streets leading from Harri- 
son avenue to the South Bay. comes next in 01 der ; 
38, 24, 23, 30, 39 and 22 follow not far behind in 
their latios of death to population. The death- 
rates of East Boston and the North End present a 
contrast which is uorthy of examination. These 
districts are of neatly equal population, and the 
numbers of all ages very nearly correspond, yet 
the mortality in one is half as gieat again as in 
the other. One is crowded, in great part deprived 
of sunlight, and full of nuisances; the other has 
abundance of light and air. Can a stronger aigu- 
ment be offered m favor of providing breathing 
spaces for the people than is presented by the fig- 
ures in the first two horizontal lines of our second 
table, from one end to the other?-" 

Alderman Power— Will the gentleman state 
which district it is which has an abundance of 
light and air? 

Alderman Prescott— It undoubtedly relets to 
East Boston. Then in the leportot the State 
Board of Health fur the following year (1872), I 
find the following on page 307: 

'■The eau-es of pievent ble disease specially de- 
scribed in our report of last year (pp. 55-G2 and 
350-368) remain in full force. They exi«t today in 
Boston as the causes of preventable fire existed in 
Chicago before the late disaster — unheeded by the 
mass of the people intent on their daily business, 
and suffered to remain bv those whose immediate 
duty it is to remove them." 

And 011 page 309 of the same report I find the 
following: 

"The same wise f 01 ecasfc which leads our com- 
mercial interests to widen streets and make bioad 
avenues for the business of the future should 
lead us, through the teachings of h'raniflin's 
political economy, to provid_e for the preservation 
of human life and human health; for these are as 
truly wealth as are cotton or iron." 

From the next leport of the same Board (1873) I 
read the following: 

"The health report of the chief city of Massa- 
chusetts for 1872 is of an unfavorable character. 
Tbe same neglect of the authorities to remove 
causes of disease, perfectly within their control, 
has continued, and their fffects are seeD io the 
extraordinary number of deaths. As a city in- 
creases, the mortality will inevitably increase 
mire rapidly than the population, unless the 
means of repressing disease keei* pace with the 
city's giowth. Bostou hr.s neglected such pro- 
visions, and is reaping tbe fruit of the neglect." 

Then I quote from the report of the same board 
in tbe year 1874— 

'The death rate of the city of Boston is so high 
as to make thf discovery of its causes a matter of 
the deepest interest to even citizen. 7869 persons 
died io 1873." 

In regard to the relative health of the city of 
Boston with other cities of the countiy, I have a 
table before me which gives the death rate of 
thirty- 6ve cities; Boston stands No 31 on that 
list. This, I think, is the death rate- 
Alderman Po«er— Will the gentleman stste the 
year be alludes to? 

Alderman Prescott— I think it is 1873. 

Alderman Power — I should like him to state 
definitely what year it is. I have given facts. 

Alderman Prescott- I would state definitely that 
it is either 1873 or 1872. 

Alderman Power — Is n't the gentleman sure 
that it is 1872? 

Alderman Prescott; — I am not able to state. 

Alderman Power -I think it was 1872. That 
happened to be the smallpox year. • 

Aklermao Prescott— The subj ect naturally re- 



curs to the question asked by so honorable a body 
as the State Board of Health, What is the reme- 
dy? It seems to rne that tbe report of tbe Park 
Commission, now before us, suggests a remedy 
v\ Inch will, to some degtee at least, increase the 
good health and diminish the de^th rate of the 
city of Boston. In connection sdt'i this matter, I 
now desirs to bring to the attention of this Board 
some action which has been taken by leading gen- 
tlemen of this city in regard to bringing this mat- 
ter before the Legislature. This action was taken 
when it se?med that by a tie vote in this Board 
the City Council were not ready to take auy steps 
for laying ouc apark. Two petitions have been pre- 
sented to the Legislature, both dat dFeb.9, 1875. I 
might read the names of these petitioners, but it 
seems to be hardly neceusary ; they have been pub- 
lished in the papers of th^ day. ana comprise the 
names of sou e of the most influential merchants 
and business men, and leading members of the 
medical profession in the city of Boston. One 
point in regard to this matter has been brought 
strcngly to the attention of the Board, and it 
seems to me that it has taken up more than a fair 
share of the discussion on the establishment of a 
park or seiies of paiks; and that is in regara to 
the present positron and unhealthfulness" of the 
territory on the Back Bay. I believe that statis- 
tics will show that 50,000 people are liviug 
there in an unhealthy locality. It has been 
snggected in connection -with this subject, 
that a water park mighl be provided for ' the 
health of the citizens of Boston in the neighbor- 
hood of Parker stieet, by means of which our sew- 
age might be more readily carried off than at 
the present time. I ao not stand nere to advocate 
the location of a water park in that locality, or 
a park in any particular locality; but I do claim 
that the experience of other cities lias shown us 
that those parks which have beeu established in 
ether places have beeu beneficial to the health of 
the people, and have proved remunerative to those 
cities. We must provide, in this matter, not only 
for the population of today, but of the future. 
Look at the growth, of Boston ; the popu- 
lation was 40,000 in 1820, 60,000 in 1840. 177,000 in 
1860, and is 350,000 and upwards in 1875. It must be 
apparent to everybody that the few open spaces 
or pleasure grounds where thr people now have an 
opportunity to go and refresh themselves will not 
be sufficient in the future as they have Deen in the 
past We have Boston Common and our Public 
Garden, and a few insignificant squares in distanr 
sections of the city; but what have we compared 
with tbe other great cities ot the continent? — 
compared with New York, Philadelphia, Brook- 
lyn , or Chicago ? The Aid errnan from Ward 12 has 
stated that he believes (he honor and credit of the 
city to be of paramount importar.ee. I fully agree 
with him in that statement. The honor and 
credit of the city of Boston are of paramount im- 
portance; but I claim that it is neither honorable 
nor creditable for the city of Boston to allow this 
state of things to continue longer if it can be 
prevented. When we found, on the 10th of No- 
vember, 1872, that sixty-five acres of the business 
portion of the city had been burned over, and 
that eighty millions' worth of property had been 
consumed, lost, what did the city do? It took 
hold and widened and extended the streets, and 
made broad avenues where theie had beer, car- 
row places before, and spent not less tha-. five 
or six millions of oo.lars. Now why 
should not some of the money which the taxpay- 
ers are paying into the treasury be put where it 
can ce made to conduce to the health and com- 
fort of the people just as well as it can in the 
widening of streets and rendering passage 
thiough those streets more easy. We are pro- 
viding schools, libraries, hospital buildings and 
other conveniences unexcelled by any other city; 
but what are we doing in the great matter of pro- 
viding for the health of the city? 

Alderman Prescott was compelled to bring his 
remarks to a close at this point, on account of 
sickness. 

Alderman Power— The gentleman from Ward 9 
begsn by quoting what people did in 1869. Of 
course every gentleman well knows that what 
might have been prudent for this Government to 
do in that year, may not be so now; the < ase is 
entirely altered. Thete is n't a man who does 
business in Boston and holds personal property 
but has seen at least twenty-five per cent, of it's 
value wiped out since that time bv the decline in 
business. Although I might quite readilvhave 
afforded to keep a carriage and tour horses at 
that time, I find it quite a burden to keep one 



9w 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



horse now, and I suppose that is the case of every 
business man in Boston — he finds an entirely dif- 
ferent state of things from what was the case in 
former years. We must go bai k to first principles 
and practrse the economy tbat prevailed before 
the late war; tbere is no question aoout that, — 
we have got to do it. Now, .-ir, tne gentleman has 
quoted statements from the Massachusetts State 
Board of Health which prove precisely what 
I have stated. He quotes East Boston as being 
healthy because there are plenty of open spaces 
there. There is just as mucb open territory in 
East Boston as there is at Parker street, and it 
has been in just as bad condition as anyplace 
near Barker street, anil it proves just what I have 
said, that where drainage empties out and is dif- 
fused in the open air, the effect is soverysmal 
that it is not perceptible. The gentleman has 
quoted East Boston as a healthy district, and the 
North End, where there is n't a foot of matte land 
except around the wharves, as unhealthy, while 
there is n't a better drained district in the city, 
and part of the territory in East Boston is worse 
than that near Parker street, which has leen al- 
luded to. Then, to show that Boston i = unbealtny, 
he quoles the time when the smallpox ragediu the 
city ; but he did not tell what the death rat: has 
been since. I gave figuies which ca'inot be con- 
troverted. Now, sir, 1 would ask th; Aldi-rmau if 
he kaows — it appears that he does not— that there 
are more open spaces in this ciiy today than in 
at.y other city m the Union of the Same size? I 
defy any one to contradict the statement that 
there are more open spaces in this city than there 
are in any other city m this Union of equal size. 
There is n't a city that has lavished so much mon- 
ey to make open spaces as Boston has. I think it 
has wisely been put into the streets, beeanse if we 
do not protect and facilitate our business we 
shall not w«nt parks or anything else. That is 
where our money has bf en well spent and spent 
for the advantage of the whole people, and that is 
where v. e should u ; .e it if we have any to spare. 
The result of that policy is that we have 
more open spaces in this city of Boston than there 
a;e in any ot^er city in the Union of equal size. I 
have given figures relating to the health of the 
people living on this istony Brook and Parker-street 
territory that he reft is to; and those figures can- 
not be contradicted, l can give the names of the 
people if he desires them. Then the question of 
sewerage can be settled by those most competent 
to do so; and it will be time than to talk about 
this park question. Therefore I hope the matter 
will not be reconsrdered. 

Alderman O'Brien — In rising to say a word or 
two on the park question I do not presume to 
think that anything I can say will alter the vote of 
this Board. This great improvement, I am afraid, 
has been blocked for the present, and this action 
on our part I feel will be a public loss. I am sur- 
mised, however, at the opposition it has met with, 
and more than surprised at the reasons given for 
this opposition. It has been denounced as a scheme 
for the unlimited expenditure of public money, 
and wholly in the interest of and urged on by land 
speculators. The.se assertions, I am satisfied, will 
not bear investigation. I have beeo led to believe 
that the series of parks proposed by the commis- 
sion, and circling the city at all points, were in the 
interest of all our citizens, benefiting all alike, and 
nothing has been said that convinces me to the 
contrary. These assertions may answer their pur- 
pose in prejudicing the publicmind against paiks, 
but should have no influence m this Board. 
Will the proposed parks require unlimited ex- 
penditure of public money? No one advocating 
the measure proposes any such expenditure. Two 
miles south of City Hall is about the centre of 
Boston. Bevond this point is a large amount of 
vacant land, delightfully located,"witb a grade 
seventy -five to 100 feet above the grade of the city 
proper. This elevated land will be the future 
residence of a large portion of our citizens when 
Boston proper, from Charlestown Bridge to the 
Roxbury line, will be devoted to business pur- 
poses. A portion of this land could now be laid 
out in parks, at a comparatively small ex- 
pense, adding largely to the taxable value of 
all adjoining lands, if this City Council 
so desire; or, if we neglect to do our 
duty, it will be built up to suit the convenience of 
land owners or building speculators, with narrow 
and irregular streets, just as old Boston stands +o- 
day, and which has already cost some $26,000,000 
to improve. We are making the. same mistake to- 
day that our ancestors did when Boston was first 
settled, and that mistake is brought home to our 



citizens by the increased taxation for street im- 
provements. Already it it announced that School 
street must be widened; th at Tremont street must 
be widened to oie bundled feet from Court to 
Boylston ; that Boylston street must be widened 
from Charles street to Washington street ; that 
Broadway must be extended to Pleasant street 
and encircle the city, and that Swett street must 
be built at a cose of nearly half a million dollars. 
The.e improvements are going on exclusively in 
one direction. It is also announced at the South 
End tbat Columbus avenue muse be extended 
through Boston Common, and the ashes of the 
dead must be disturbed, and the Granary Burying 
Ground and the burying ground on the Common 
must be aiven up to horse railroads. Even the 
old landmarks are not respected. These, and such 
as thess, are the expensive improvements that 
make our taxpayers groan today — the mistakes of 
a previous generation ; and shall we go on and al- 
low the most beautiful part of enlarged Boston to 
be built up in the same manner? Are the pro- 
pose 1 p^rss merely in the interest of land specu- 
lators ? Suppose that every foot of land taken for 
the series of parks proposed by the commission 
was bought from parties who might be termed 
land speculators. For every dollar expended for 
land, ten, twenty and fifty dollars would be ex- 
pended for labor as years roll on The land once 
secured, it woull bs almost exclusively the work 
of labor to complete the park--. The land once se- 
cured, it would be the work of labor to grade 
and plant and b autify it. No improve- 
ment has ever been commenced in Boston 
more in th 3 m terest of labor than the proposed 
series of parks. If then this great improvement 
is to go forth by the unworthy name of a specula- 
tion, let us calf it by its true name. If it is a 
speculation it is a speculatiau more in the interest 
of workingmen than any other class. Let us say 
to the workingmen, now crowded together in 
narrow streets and badly ventilated dwellings, 
and knocking at every man's door for something 
to do, that we will r.ot raise a band either to give 
them employment or a breathing place for health 
and recreation. Because business is a little de- 
pressed, is that any reason why all public improve- 
ments should stop ? Such a doctrine will have a 
more baneful influence on the public mindthan any 
exaggerated reports of the death-rate referred 
to in the previous discussion of this question. 
When men, who lunuence legislation, stand up in 
Congress and say that all public improvements 
must stop because business is a little out of joint, 
when the same sentiment is repeated in a Massa- 
chusetts Legislature, when thp representatives of 
the wealthy city of Boston say that all improve- 
ments musi cease, because business is depressed 
temporarily, I can only say, God help the working- 
man who looks to the country, the State or the 
city for employment! Our private citizens do not 
conduct their business in this way. A great 
many manufacturers in Massachusetts have 
been running their mills at a loss during 
the year; but do they stop? No. They 
feel under some obligation to the thousands 
of workmen in their employ, and like public-spir- 
ited citizens go on, believing that the average 
business of some years will niske them good. An- 
other argument against parks, that always comes 
up when the question is discussed, is our beauti- 
ful suburbs. I should, like to know of what ad- 
vantage our beautiful suburbs are to the great 
mass of our citizens? Suppose, for instance, any 
number of our citizens from Wards 2, 7 and 12— J 
select these localities because they are crowded — 
find their way outto these suburbs during the sul- 
try days of July, August and September, for 
health, recreation or fresh air. In all human prob- 
ability they would be warned off as intruders ; 
they would have no alternative but to 
take to the highways, and I know of 
no more uncomfortable place than the dusty roads 
of these suburbs, with a hot sun pouring down 
upon you. I have travelled these roads at all 
seasons of the year, and have scarcely met a strag- 
gler by the wayside. This talk pbout our beauti- 
ful suburbs be'iDg any benefit to the mass of our 
people is sheer nonsense. They are owned, occu- 
pied and cultivated by our wealthy citizens for 
their own pleasure arid enjoyment, and are not 
common property, as might oe inferred by out- 
siders, who are not conversant with the facts. 
That thf,y are beautiful, I admit; and 
that is a strong argument why a portion 
of them should be secured for the bene- 
fit of the public, befoie it is too late. 
The sewerage question that has been introduced 



MARCH 1 , 1875 



99 



in this discussion I believe should be discussed 
from another standpoint. After living; at, the 
South End some twelve 3 ears, I believe I know 
something; about the sewera-e of tnat local- 
ity, aud when the proper lima comes I will 
have something to say about it. So far as this 
sewerage question is concerned in relation to 
parks, the matter has beenisuffioiently discussed 
by tbe Aldermen from Wards 6 and 12. I was 
very much amused, however, by the description 
of tbe settlement known bv the odd name of 
Gravelly Point, by tbe Alderman from Ward 12, 
where the death rate is so small. Are the Alder- 
men acquainted with the locality? I wish I could 
describe it for them. A low marshy country, with 
the mouth of a huge sewer exposed to view, 
vomiting; lorth its tilth aud dirt in an open 
space. It is plainly seen as you pass along 
Parker street to tbe Highlands, the air 
filled with all kinds of odors, and tne sight alone 
is a disgusting; one. In tbis neighborhood is Grav- 
elly Pomt, where ths death rate is so small. I bave 
no figures to contradict those of the Alderman 
from Ward 12: I would not contradict them if I 
could. But if the deatb rate i* so small 
in that locality, I must say tnat the 
people there have extraordinary constitutions. 
I should like to have this petition go to tbe 
Legislature. The gentlemen who oppose it now 
have no basis for their opposition but the timid 
one that it may do harm. Not a dollar is asked 
for, and until large expenditures are asked for 
the arguments against the petition have no foun- 
dation and should have no weight. I btlieve we 
should be only doing our duty to the people if we 
make some progre-s in this great improvement. 

Alderman Worthington — When this discus-sum 
was up before, the Alderman from Ward 12 
charged that it was entirely a project for the ben- 
efit of land speculators on Back Bay— to improve 
their land and get tie largest possible amount of 
money from th ; city for their land. On the night 
that we voted 6 and 6 against this order, there was 
a gentleman in this room who ha« taken an inter- 
est in the subject of parks and fiesh air for the 
people. After leaving h=re be sat clown and chew 
up a petition which you have seen presented to 
the Legislature by taxpayers and not speculators; 
and I propose to show you the amount of taxes 
the,y pay as citizens of Boston. 

Alderman Power— Has the gentleman any ob- 
jections to giving the name of the person who got 
up the petition? 

Alderman Worthington — If it is necessary I will 
give his name. In one single horn on the next 
day he obtained sixty-three names to tbe petition. 
He was iu my office before twelve o'clock the next 
day aud assured me that he bad obtained them in 
less than one hour. Here are the names of the 
petitioners. The whole amount represented by 
them— not their entire property, but the amount 
that tbey are assessed for— is $12,367,200, and not 
one of them is a land speculator. There are James 
L. Little, S. K. Lothrop, William S. Appletou, G. 
Washington Warren, Dr. E. H. Clarke, Benjamin 
E. Bates— and millions behind— R. H. Eddy, J. 
Huntington Wolco>t— I think we have all heard 
of these names. 

Alderman Power — Will the gentleman state 
whether they are citizens of Boston? 

Alderman Worthington — They are citizens of 
Boston. 

Alderman Power— Is Mr. Bates a citizen of Bos- 
ton? 

Alderman Worthington — He is, and lives on the 
Back Bay. S. L. Abbot, Rev. Edward E. Hale, 
Jonathan Mason, John T. Bush, Edward Atkinson 
— he is a resident of Brooklme, but a large tax- 
payer in Boston — Eben N. Horsford, a taxpayer in 
Boston, but a citizen of Cambridge, and a gentle- 
man who appreciates the importance of fresh air. 

Alderman Harris— "Will the gentleman state 
what Mr. Horsford pays taxes on? 

Alderman Worthington— John E. Tyler, James 
R. Chadwick, James T. Fields, Theodore Lyman, 
Charles C. Perkins, Franklin Haven — does the 
gentleman name him as a large land speculator in 
Boston? I think I am justified in saying he never 
speculated in a foot of land in Boston ; he is trus- 
1ee with two other?, for a large property that was 
purchased of the Water Power Company when in 
straightened circumstances, but they do not offer 
it to the city; they bought it because the Boston 
Water Power Company must have money. I have 
no doubt that some parties have bought land ex- 
pecting to make money on it. Even the Alder- 
man from Ward 12, when he buys an old 
steamboat, does it to make money. But 



tiiere men are in no sense land speculators. Thom- 
as Bouvc, Edward Warren, Charles Pickering, 
Edwaid Adams, Franklin Hunt, Edward A.White, 
Joseph Sawyer, F. W. Pelton David Snow— and 
there is a man who pays taxes on $737,900 person- 
al property and land in Boston— Charles E. Fuller, 
J.Wiley Edmands, Peter Haivey, William Awory, 
George W. Wales, Henry B. Rogers, H. W. Ben- 
ham, H.W.Williams, S. D- na Hayes, Percival 
Eveiett, S.D.Warren, H. P. Bowuitch, B. Joy 
Jeffries, Henry P. Kidder, James Lee, Jr., George 
Snell, R. C. Waterston, George C. Rich- 
ardson — $624,600 for rtal estate and person- 
al for himself alone — Asa P. Potter, Otis 
Shepa.rd, E R. Mudge, Edward Lawrence, 
Samuel H. Russell, D. P. Butler, Henry H. Atkios. 
Those were only a few names obtained in less 
than one hour for a petition for paras around 
Boston. If these names could be obtained in one 
hour, what could not bave been obtained if they 
had seen fit to follow it up for- two or three days, 
as might have been done in carrying the pecition 
about Boston. They did not find a solid man who 
pays large taxes — not one— who refused; and yet 
the gentleman bases his whole argument upon the 
taxpayers of Boston. Now, sir, what better evi- 
dence do we want that tbi; taxpayers of Boston 
favor parks than this single petition obtained in 
less than oue hour? 

Alderman Barrage — I thir.k you are mistaken in 
regard to no one having refused to sign. I think 
I know of some. 

Aldermao Worthington — 1 was informed by the 
gentleman who biought the petition to my office 
— I piinted it that afternoon— that he did not 
bave one single person refuse to s ign It, of the en- 
tire number to whom he presented it. I have 
no doubt but that some may have refused. 
I have no doubt but that if it was offered 
to the Alderman from Ward 10 he would 
have refused; but of this largs petition I have 
been informed that not one refused of those who 
were asked. Now, sir, I am in favor of the city of 
Boston having the right to purchase land for 
parks, when the City Council thinks such action 
advisable. I do not approve of the Back Bay 
Water Park, and I do not approve of mingling 
the question of sewerage with this one. That 
subject will take care of itself and it should not 
have been brought into this at all. This ii simply 
to obtain the right to take land for parks. We 
know that three years ago there w as a large 
majority in favor of parks, and I believe there is 
today. That we need parks no will question ; but 
that they can be laid out at no great expense we 
have tbe experience of every city in the United 
States that the taxes from the rise in the value of 
land pays the interest on the expenditure. If a 
man owns a house, and pays $20,000 for it, and 
the income from that house pays the interest on 
the purchase money, is he out of pocket? When 
the Alderman from Ward 12 buys an old steam- 
boat, and gets back the interest on what he 
paid, does he call himself out of pocket? 
Should the citizens of Boston call themselves 
out of pocket when they get back all they have paid 
out? But the actual value of tbe park' in dollars 
and cents is nothing compared to the health of 
tne citizens. I am in favot of a series of parks 
and boulevards being laid out when tbe City 
Council sees fit. I am in favor of building horse 
or steam railroads, so that the poorer classes of 
the citizens of Boston can tide there at a small 
expense and have tbe privilege of going into the 
open spaces without trespassing upon the private 
grounds of any one. I have sometimes ridden out 
to the suburbs of Boston and have seen 
the poorer classes walking about there. A 
n an and his wife and children walking in the 
stieet, come up in tront of these beautiful 
places that the gentleman calls his parks, and 
what do they see directly before thern? "Trespas- 
sers forbidden upon this land." And there is no 
place out of tbe city of Boston where tbey can go 
and walk and get fresh air. That is a sad thing 
for the poor of Boston. I know very well ho* I 
wanted fresh air wheo I first came r,o Boston. 
I came from the hills of the country, and 
went into Congress street to do my labor; 
but on Sunday afternoon I used to "-alk 
six or eighi miles out of town and back 
again for the privilege ot getting up into the High- 
lands and breathing a little fresh air, and I know 
that I came back to my work on Monday a great 
deal better th=/n when I went away Saturday 
night. It we could have a park, where the poor 
could go with their children and take a lunch, and 
have a good place to read and rest, and return at 



100 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



night, we should h.we less deaths in the city of 
Boston. 1 care rot whether they should go from 
the Highlands or from Wards 7 and 12, they will 
come back a gieat deal better and stronger lor 
their week's labor; the children would 
study better in school, and the whole fam- 
ilv would be better for the exercise in the free 
air which God intended they should breathe. I 
hope we shall pass this order, so that when the 
citizens of Boston are ready for a series of parks, 
they can have parks. If they should be confined 
merely to the Back rsay 1 would vote against 
them; but I hof>e we shall have a series of Darks, 
and help to bulla a railroad to them and through 
them, as has been done in Baltimore, so that the 
people will not be charged extravagant car 
fares. When we do that 1 believe we shall answer 
the requirements of our citizens, and our votes 
will be cast more to the satisfaction of the peo- 
ple than any other thing; we can do. 

Alderman Power in i he chair. 

Alderman Clark— I did not intend to have any- 
thing further to say upon this subject, but I have 
a statement which! wish to make in regard to the 
improved valuation of the Back Bay territory and 
the amount of taxable property which thf se land 
speculators have created for' the city of Boston 
during the la^t nineteen years. I have advocated, 
the importance of this measure thus far purely on 
sanitary grounds, not because I am not in 
favor of park? in the fullest sense of the word. 
I btlieve that Boston should have a series of parks 
large enough to compare favorably with those of 
other cities in the Union ; and I believe it is for 
the inteiest of the city to commence laying out 
such a, series of parks as we shall not he ashamed 
of in the future. But I believe the drainage of the 
city should receive our attention first of all 
things ; and that in order to accomplish this object, 
we shall find it for our interest to improve a sec- 
tion of the city that is now under indictment as a 
public nuisar.ce, improve it by creating a water 
basin to assist the sewerage, and in making the 
improvement there, an area more beautiful than 
the Public, Garden can be obtained, which will so 
enhance the value of the surrounding pioperty 
that the increased valuation will in a very short 
time pay the entire cost, and rid the city of what 
is today a disgrace to a civilized community. I 
wish it distinctly understood that I got this idea 
of a water basin' from an eminent engineer in the 
employ of the city today. It is not an idea of my 
own. I do not prof ess to b° an engineer and am 
not competent to originate such an idea; but I did 
obtain that idea from an eminent engineer em- 
ployed by the city of Boston. There is not the 
slightest question but that, if this commis- 
sion to be appointed by his honor the Mayor 
should decide that the best way — as has been 
stated by the engineer to whom 1 refer — to im- 
prove our sewerage would be to create a water 
basin, it would improve the territory and enhance 
the value of the suriounding property and more 
than pay the entire cost of constructing this ba- 
sin. I, for one, should be very glad to join a com- 
pany of men to take that territory and build the 
reservoir, and get my money back out of the en- 
hanced value of land. If there is so much 
danger of land speculators, buy more 
rich oy this improvement and enhancing proper- 
ty value from five to seven millions, as stated 
by the Alderman from Ward 12, let the city take 
a sufficient quantity of land to completely control 
the surroundings, and sell such as may not be 
needed for the basin for building purposes. I 
h?ve n't the slightest doubt but there will be a 
very large increase in the valuation. We all re- 
member when the land around the Public (harden 
was not worth $1.50 per foot. It is only a few 
years since. What could the city have made had 
she owned the land surrounding that spot! What 
has she made by the increase of ,the property 
as it stands today? An increase of taxable prop- 
erty of more than thirty-four millions of dollars, 
and I have a letter showing the details : 

Assessors' Office, City Hall, ) 
Bostojst, March 1, 1875. J 
Alderman John T. Clark: Dear Sir — In accord- 
ance with your request, I have examined the 
records of our department to ascertain as nearly 
as may be the comparative valuation of the Back 
Bay Basin in 1855 and for the current financial 
year. It being impossible to fix the line which 
formerly ran between the land of the city of Bos- 
ton and others, and the flats of the Boston Water 
Power Company, near Tremont street and in some 
parts of Roxbury, for the purpose of this estima- 



tion, I have taken an arbitrary line clearly within 
the lines of the Back Bay Basin. The line may be 
described as follows: 

Beginning at the corner of Beacon and Arling- 
ton streets, through Arlington, Ferdinand, Chan- 
dler and Berkeley streets to Warren avenue ; then 
through vVarren andCclombus avenues to Camden 
street, through the said street and by t*-e Old Dyke 
(so called) to the marshes lecentiy sold by the 
Boston Water Power Company to the Boston Band 
Company on the east side of Parker street; thence 
crossing Parker street and following the line of 
the creek and including th» Island Marshes (so 
called) to the channel of Muddy River, which was 
the ancient boundary between Roxbury and 
Brookline; thence by the said boundary line to 
Beacon street and by the centre of that street to 
the point of beginning. 

All of the real estate assessed to the Boston 
Water Power Company in 1855, within this 
line, by the city of Boston, amounted to $900,000 

By the city of Roxbury 14,500 

Total assessed to that company in 1855 $914,500 

Total amount assessed to other persons by the 
city of Roxbury in 1855 128,009 



Total assessed value in 1855 $1,042,500 

The amount assessed in this basin in 1874 was as 
follows : 

Other persons 
Boston Water and 

Power Co. corporations. 

AVard 15 $ 1 ,604,500 $2,929,400 

6 506,700 13,921,400 

9 13,269,200 

" 11 16.500 1,976,000 

$32,096,000 
2,127,700 



Total $2,127,700 



Total assessment $34,223,700 

In addition to these amounts should be added 
the value of the filled land of the Com- 
monwealth, estimated by the commis- 
sioners at $1,000,000 

And property of the city and of churches, 
charitable and literary institutions, and 
of land sold by the State not yet taxable. . 4,688,900 

I cannot claim that these figures are strictly 
accurate, as it is impossible to find on the 
records of the city of Roxbury for 1855 
all the estates within the line above 
described. The property being consider- 
ed of small value, some of the land was 
probably not assessed. But, making 
proper allowance for those estates which 
cannot be f ouud in the record of 1855, the 
total valuation of that year cannot have 

exceeded 1 ,100,000 

for the whole territory, including that 
now devoted to streets and public squares. 

Against this amount can be put the valuation 

of May last 40,012,600 



Showing an increase of property of 38,912,600 

From which deduct exempt property 4,688,900 

The taxable value is shown as $34,223,700 

And. the taxable increase is 33.123,700 

Very respectfully, 

Thomas Hills, 

Ch. Assessors. 

Now, Mr. Chairman, these are the factj, taken 
from the Assessors' books this very first day of 
March, 1875. The increase of the taxable valua- 
tion of real estate is $33,123,700, and, at. the rate of 
$15.60, the city derives $500,000 in taxes from this 
territory. That is the property which these land 
speculators have created for the city of Boston. 
In addition to this, personal property has in- 
creased immensely in this territory, inasmuch as, 
had it not been filled up, many of the people who 
have been compelled to move may have been driven 
into the adjoining towns, and we have, perhaps, 
enough to carry it up to fifty or sixty millions. 
This is what these land speculators have done for 
the city. They have created thirty-four millions 
of taxable property, giving us an annual income 
of over $500,000. The city has paid out no money 
upon this improvement with the sole exception of 
gradrng the streets after they have been deeded to 
the city— possibly a bridge may have been built 
across Berkeley street; that I do not remember. 
But they have not given a dollar towards the con- 
struction of the streets ; and this is what has been 
done for the city by these land speculators. 
Now a great many of these same par- 
ties who live on that territory have come 
here and asked us to do something in the 
way of establishing public parks and improving 
the drainage in that section and in all sections of 



MARCH 1, 1875 



lOl 



the city. But finding that we would not be likely 
to agree ar.d request the Mayor to petition the 
Legislature for authority to take lands for the 
purpose, they have gone directly to the Legisla- 
ture themselves. The character of those men 
should certainly receive some consideration from 
our hands ; they are not land speculators or men 
engaged in speculation to any great extent. It 
seems to me that we should do no nioie than 
our duty if we assist them to obiain 
the right to take land to imprvoe the 
sanitary condition of the city. And by 
the sanitary condition of the city I mean every- 
thing that tends to improve the health of the citi- 
zens, whether it be drainage or public parks. The 
arguments adduced this afternoon by the Alder- 
man f i om Ward 9 in regard to what the people in 
former years have done are a strong reason why 
we should not refuse to ask the Mayor to petition 
for authority for this purpose. 1 have not at- 
tempted, nor do I, at the present time, intend to 
discuss the merits or demerits of the question, or 
the propriety of spending; large sums of money 
upon public parks at the present time. But 
there has n't been a public park established 
in this country that has not been of vast, 
benefit to the health of the citizens, and 
there is no reason why the same result should 
not follow in Boston that has been obtained in 
New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore. ' I might 
go on and elaborate upon the character of the 
people who came before the committee of 1869: I 
might read extracts from the remarks made be- 
fore the commission, but it is wholly unnecessary 
at the present time. There is no question but that 
when such men as Marshall P. Wilder, George B. 
Upton, George B. Emerson and men of that class 
come here and advocate the propriety of the city 
building parks they do so for the interest 
of the people. It is not a piivate spec- 
ulation, but wholly in the interest of the 
people. Another reason for reconsideration is 
this: We have requested the Mayor to appoint a 
commission to examine into the subject of drain- 
age. Now, there can be no harm in obtaining 
from the Legislature the right to take lands, 
either by purchase or otherwise, for such pur- 
poses as that commission may recommend. If 
they do not recommen 1 the taking of land for a 
water basin, or the establishment of parks, we 
are not obliged to do it unless we so desire. It 
does seem to me that, taking all these things into 
consideration, we should leconsider this vote, and 
lay the order upon the table for the time being, 
or else pass it, and obtaiu the authority to take 
lands when we so desire. 

Alderman Sebbins — Since this question was 
first brought before the City Council of the pres- 
ent year its aspect has changed somewhat. At 
first it was proposed for the city to obtain author- 
ity from the Legislature to lay out a series of pub- 
lic parks, but by the action of this Boarlatthe 
last meeting it has assumed a somewhat different 
shape. The Mayor is authorized to appoint a 
commission, who shall consider the subject of 
drainage, and more especially with reference to a 
water park or large flushing basin in connection 
with the present system of sewerage. Now, when 
these commissioners, if they are appointed, shall 
have concluded their labors and report that it is 
advisable for the health of the city to have such a 
large basin established, I can see that it would 
be desirable for the city to have authority to do 
so. I shall, therefore, favor the reconsideration; 
if it prevails I shall offer an amendment, and if it 
is adopted I shal vote for the order. Ihe ques- 
tion has also assumed a different shape within the 
last few days by the presentation of a petition to 
the Legislature by many citizens, asking for the 
same authority for the city. I have not changed 
my own judgment as to the advisability of the 
city laying out these parks at the present time, but 
I am willing to have these gpntlemen go to the 
Legislature and pieseot their case. It will de- 
volve upon Messrs. Edward Lawrence, E. R. 
Mudge, ana James L. Little, who are large tax- 
payers, to prove to the Legislature that a park is 
for the interest of the city ; and if they establish 
that fact and the Legislature shall so vote, and the 
citizens of Boston concur, I am content, although 
™-.V judgment is entirely adverse to the establish- 
men^of parks. In regard to the improvement of our 
sewerage, I am heartily in favor of that, and 
would vote to spend a large amount to bring that 
about. 

Alderman Harris — I desire to stale that I have 
paired off with Alderman Prescott, and ask to be 
excused from voting. 



The motion to reconsider prevailed — yeas 6, 
nays 4: 

Yeas— Alder in en Bigelow, Clark, O'Brien, Quin- 
cy, Stebbins, Worthington— 6. 

Nays — Aldermen Burrage, Pope, Power, Viles 
—4. 

The question was upon the passage of the order 
as given above, with the amendments. 

Alderman Stebbins — I move to ameud so that 
the vote shall be taken at the next State election. 

The amendment was adopted. 

Alderman Clark — It seems to me that one of the 
amendments would be fatal to the bill, inasmuch 
as it provides that no money shall be expended 
except what is raised each year by direct taxa- 
tion. If this commission should report that it is 
absolutely necessary to make certain improve- 
ments, they might cost more than it would be ex- 
pedient to put into the tax levy for the coming 
year. These improvements will be for the benefit 
of coming generations, and it does not seem to me 
that we ought to pay for the entire expense as we 
go along. I am willing to follow the advice 
of his honor the Mayor, that if anything should 
be done for parks — if land is purchased, for 
instance — no improvements should be made 
except by money raised by taxation during the 
current year. But if this Commission should say 
that it is necessary to raise money for sanitary 
purposes, it would hardly be fair to put the total 
amount into the tax levy of 1875 or 1876. There- 
fore I move to strike out the amendment relating 
to putting the cost of the improvements each year 
into the tax levy. 

Alderman Burrage — I hope that motion will not 
be carried, for the reason that I gave the other 
day, that it is very injudicious to increase our 
public debt at the present time. As was said 
then, the interest on the aebt (exclusive of the 
water loan) in 1873-74 amounted to $25 per head 
for the 70,199 assessed polls in the city, and one- 
fifth of the whole tax levy went to the payn.ent 
of interest. It seems to me to be inadvisable 
to increase the debt of the city now unless 
for such a matter as a supply of water, 
which is a necessity, and which, in fact, pays 
for the expenditure, or at least pays the in- 
terest. I regret that the Alderman from 
Ward 8 has changed his position, and 1 think he 
begins to see the difficulty already. If the ques- 
tions of a public park and sewerage are divided, 
that is another thing. A good system of sewerage 
is necessary for the city ; but parks are a luxury, 
and we can dispense with them. I think it can be 
shown that all improvements of new territory 
have cost as much as has been received from the 
increased taxes on the enhanced valuation ; and 
there will always be as much money spent on this 
territory when improved as you will get from the 
higher valuation. I don't think you will find 
that the improvements reduce the rate of taxa- 
tion. Certainly t'oey have not in New York or 
Boston. In New York it hasn't increased the 
rate, because they have continued to run deeper 
in debt. The net debt of the city is now one hun- 
dred and fifteen millions. In the last three years 
under a reform government, it has increased 
eleven millions a year, and the three years pre- 
vious to that the increase was eighteen millions a 
year. 

That must stop somewhere or else New York 
will go to the dogs. There is no question about 
that. They will kill the goose which lays the 
golden egg; it will be impossible to do business 
there. And it will be so in Boston. If you drive 
business away, of what use will be your parks? 
It seems to me to be a vital matter that we should 
not increase the indebtedness of the city unless it 
is for something of absolute importance to the 
health of the city. 

Alderman Quincy— The last words of the Alder- 
man are correct— "unless for sonaethinq, impor- 
tant to the health of the city." I think that it is 
of absolute importance to the health of the city 
to increase the debt in order to have good sewer- 
age and decrease the present extravagant death 
rate. 

Alderman Clark — The rate of taxation in Boston 
is a little high just now, but we don't propose to 
keep it there a great while. Prior to the great fire 
the rate was very rapidly reduced. When the rate 
is reduced from $13 to $11 in a few years, that is 
about as fast as it can be done. There is no ques- 
tion but that the rate can be reduced within the 
next few years to what it was before the great 
fire. It is n't to be supposed that what the 
city of Boston did after the great fire, when 
she expended five or six millions in one year 



102 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



for widening streets, will be doue again. It 
then did what it would not otherwise have 
done in five or ten years. A fortnight 
atter the great fire the citizens said, Let us 
improve that territory. The Alderman fioui Ward 
10 has he en benefited by that improvement and 
the creating of that debt; and so have other citi- 
zens. I admit that th<? rate of taxation is high; 
but does it frighten any of us that we have this 
thirty-three millions of additional taxable prop- 
erty and get $500,000 out of it per annum, which 
we would n't hav- had if these land speculators 
on tbe Back Bay had n't made it for us ? We are 
so much richer for having tbis improved terri- 
tory. I want it distinctly understood tbat I am in 
favor of parks, and I don't believe we can af- 
ford to do without them. If v.e establish 
a public pai k the increased valuation of tbe sur- 
lp u riding property will pay for the entire expen- 
diture for tbe purchase of the land, and the im- 
provement of it for ten years, whether laid out in 
Wards 6, 16 or 17. That is th's experience of every, 
city in the Union, and there is no reason it should 
not be so in Boston. Business is dull just no* ; 
every one in tr .de is aware of that. But that is 
no sign tbat it is goinsr to remain so forever. We 
have al way had just such times as these every 
few years; but I believe that those in business 
will see as good times during the next 
few mouths as they have ever seen in 
the city of Boston. We cannot afford 
to stop these public improvements. Every 
improvement made in the city of Boston for the 
last five years has made the city richer. No mem- 
ber of this Bo rd would have the streets put back 
where they were ten years ago if he could, even if 
the rate of taxation were reduced titty per cent. 
I trust the motion to sti ike out that amendment 
will prevail. It is n't worth while for us to pay 
over a certain amount each year for sanitary 
measures and that amendment would perhaps 
prohibit the cariying out of any recommeadations 
which this commission might make. 

Alderman. Bur rage called for the yeas and nays 
on the motion to strike out. 

Alderman Harris asked for the ruling of the 
Chair as to his competency to vote upon this 
amendment, as be and Alderman Prescott had 
voted the same upon that question. 

Alderman Clark protested that Alderman Har- 
ris had no right to vote upon the park question 
under the circumstances. 

The Cbair ruled th?,t if one Aldeiman has paired 
with another he cannot vote upon that quest : on. 

Alderman Harris — My point was that the iren- 
tleman from Ward 9 and myself voted alike upon 
this arneudrnent. 

The motion to strike out was lost — yeas 5, nays 5. 

Yeas — A'derineu Bigelow, Clark, O'Brien, Quin- 
cy, Worthington— 5. 

Nays — Aldermen Burrage," Pope, Power, Steb- 
bins, Viles— 5. 

Alderman Stebbins moved to amend still fur- 
ther by inserting after the words "authorized or 
made," rhe words -'without authority from the 
Legislature." If it is desirable to create a loan, 
application to the Legislature can be made at any 
time. 

Alderman Burrage asked if that proviso might 
not be put into the act. 

Aldeiman Stebbins said it would if the Legisla- 
ture so decided, and they will be competent to 
pass upon it. 



Alderman Burrage thought the last proposed 
amendment rather made nonsense of the whole 
thing. 

Tbe amendment of Alderman Stebbins was 
adopted by a using vote — 7 for, 1 against — and the 
order was passed -yeas 6, nays 4. 

Yeas — Aldermen Bigelow, Clark, O'Brien, 
Quincy, Stebbins, Worthington— 6. 

Nays— Aldermen Burrage, Pope, Power, Viles — 
4. 

Subsequently a motion to reconsider the last 
vote, made by Alderman Clark, honing it would 
not prevail, was lost- yeas 3, nays 1." 

Yeas — Aldermen Burrage, Power, Viles — 3. 

Nays— Aldermen Bigelow, Clark, O'Brien. Pope, 
Quincy, Stebbins, Worthington — 7. 

The order as passed is appended with the 
original amendments in brackets, anc' the fcimend- 
ments adopted today in quotation marks: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to petition the Gsueral Court, now m session, 
tor the passage of an act authorizing the city to 
purchase, or otherwise take, lands within 'the 
limits of the city for the purpose of laying out 
public parks, and also authorizing the assessment 
of betterments upon the adjoining lands benefited 
by tbe establishment of such parks; [provided, 
however, that no expenditure shall be authorized 
or made " without authority frefn he Legislature," 
for the piirebase or improvement of any land ex- 
ceeding in amount the -um raised by taxation and 
appropriated by the City Council for that pur- 
pose, and all money actually received by the city 
for betterments assessed tipon adjoining lands]; 
[said act net to take effect unless accepted by a 
majority of tbe legal voters present, and voting 
thereon at meetings duly called for that purpose 
in the seveial wares] "at the next State election." 

Sent dowTi. 

COMMISSION TO INVESTIGATE SUBJECT OF SEWER- 
AGE. 

Alderman Stebbins offered the following: 

Ordered, That the order pa&sed by this Board, 
Feb. 23, 1875, authorizirg the Mayor to appoint a 
commission to report upon the present sewerage 
of the city, be so far modified— in case his Honor 
the Mayor should deem it expedient— as to make 
the said commission consist of two civil engineers 
and one competent person, skilled in the subject 
of. sanitary science, instead of three civil engineers, 
as ruovided in the order quoted above; the said 
commission shs-.ll, in addition to investigating and 
repotting upon the several subjects recited in the 
oiiginal order, report an approximate estimate of 
the expense of any plan or plans for a system of 
sewerage submitted by them. 

Alderman Stebbius explained the order, repeat- 
ins- the substance of it as above, and moved that 
it take its second reading. 

Alderman Harris desired the order to lie over 
as it had just come up for the first time, and he 
moved that it be specially assigned for the next 
meeting. 

Alderman Stebbins said the original order 
came up in the same way, but the committee op- 
posed having it lie over. The modification pio- 
posed is very simple. 

The motion to assign was lost, and the order 
was read a second time and passed. 

On motion of Alderman Worthington the 
Board adjourned. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



103 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Proceedings of the Common Council, 

MARCH 4, 1875. 



Regular weekly meeting at 7% o'clock P. M., 
Halsey J. Boaiduian, President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN FOR 
CONCURRENCE. 

Notice of John E. Fitzgerald of dissatisfaction 
with assessment for raising grade of estate on 
Northampton-street district, and resignation of 
Joseph Buckley as an Overseer of the Poor. Sever- 
ally referred. 

A communication from the Street Commission- 
ers, in relation to the widening of School street, 
came down referred to the Joint Committee on 
Streets with the request that they furnish an ap- 
proximate estimate of the cost of said widening. 
The Council concurred in the reference and in- 
structions, with the following amendment offered 
by Mr. Whitmore of Ward 4: "And that the com- 
mittee he requested to report, also, the cost of 
widening Beacon street on the east side between 
Tremontand Somerset streets; also the cost of 
widening Beacon street on both sides from Somer- 
set to Park street on the main line of the build- 
ings." Sent up. 

Communication from City Messenger giving no- 
tice of appointment of Foster M. Spurr and Henry 
B. Lorts as First and Second Assistant Messenger, 
respectively. Confirmed. 

Order for the employment of necessary assist- 
ance in Department for Survey, etc., of Buildings, 
at not exceeding $2000. Passed to a second read- 
ing. 

Report and order for a permit to J. Arthur Peck 
to erect a wooden building on Boston & Lowell 
Railroad quay No. 21, Charlestown. Order read 
twice and passed. 

Report nominating Edward Hatch as Inspector 
in Chief of Lighters, and John Kenney, John J. 
Caddigan and Jobn C. Brooks as assistants, and 
certificate of the election of said persons to such 
offices by the Board of Aldermen. 

Report accepted and nominations laid over. 

Order authorizing the Mayor to petition for an 
act for the purchase or taking of lands within the 
city for public parks, and for the assessment of 
betterments on adjoining lands benefited ; no ex- 
penditure to be made, without authority from, 
the Legislature, for the purchase or improvement 
of land, exceeding the sums raised by taxation 
appropriated by the City Council, and received by 
betterment; said act not to take effect unless 
accepted by a majority of the legal voters at the 
next State election. 

Mr. Peabodj of Ward 9 thought this an impor- 
tant matter, and likely to provoke discussioi., and, 
as there were two special assignments already, he 
moved to lay the order on the table for the time 
being, which motion was adopted. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order authorizing a room to he fitted up for a 
laboratory in the basement of the Roxbury High 
Schoolhouse. Passed and sent up. 

AUDITOR'S ESTIMATES. 

The followi g [City Doc. No. 321 was received: 

Office of the Auditor of Accounts, ) 
City Haul, Feb. 27, 1875. ) 
Halsey J. Eoardman, Esq., President of the Com- 
mon Council: Sir— Conforming to the require- 
ments of the ordinance in relation to finance, I 
have the honor of submitting to the City Council 
the accompanying estimates of the amount of 
money which will be required to defray the ex- 
penses of the city of Boston and county of Suffolk 
for the financial year 1875-76, commencing May 1, 
1875, and terminating April 30, 1876. The financial 
year embraces the Auditor's draft payable May 1, 
the date of its commensement. The amount for 
State tax is omitted from the estimates this year, 
as it was from the appropriation and tax levy or- 
der of last year, for the reason that the Legisla- 
ture of the State pass upon the amount to be 
taxed so late in the session that it cannot be em- 
braced with accuracy in the estimates. The tax 
levied by the State the assessors are required to 
raise by' special requisition. The amount paid 
last year by Boston, on account of State tax, was 



,120, and it will probably be the same the 
present year. 

The calculations for interest and premium, and 
for the county oi Suffolk, are marie close, and the 
estimates of the several departments have under- 
gone careful scrutiny by committees, in some in- 
stances reduced by them, and seem to bear evi- 
dence of being based upon the i ctual wants and 
requirements of the various departments, without 
requiring any additions to them during the year; 
and those having charge of each appropriation 
should have this fact constantly in view, as it is 
very important, as the estimates of many depart- 
ments are more general than usual, that nothing 
should be undertaken which the appropriation to 
which it is chargeable cannot meet. Strict ac- 
countaDility in this respect should be adhered to. 
The rules or the City Council adopted this year 
are also very explicit hat no expenditure shall oe 
made not contemplated at the time the appropria- 
tion was made, without the sanction of the City 
Council first oeing obtained therefor and pro- 
vision made for the same. It is a source of con- 
gratulation that in meeting the actual wants of 
the municipality, and avoiding the borrowing of 
money for other than for the additional supply of 
water, extension of the water works, and exten- 
sive and costly street rmpiovemwnts, the tax per 
each thousand dollars will be largely reduced 
from last year, as will be seen. 

The estimated expenditures for 1875-76 are $12,188,805.00 
The estimated income for 1875-76 is 2,864,425.00 



$9,324,380.00 
To which add three per cent, for the amount 
of taxes which will not be paid into the 
treasury during the financial year- 279,731 .00 

We have a total which in the judgment of 
the Auditor of Accounts should be the 
tax for 1875, exclusive of the State tax.. $9,604,111.00 



The following is a comparison of the appropria- 
tions asked for and (income to be received com- 
pared with the estimates for 1875 : 

1875-76. 1874-75. 

Appropriations $12,188,805.00 $13,645,143.00 

Income 2,864,405.00 2,728,850.00 

9,324,380.00 • 10,916,293.00 
Percentage 279,731.00 327,489.00 

$9,604,111.00 $11,243,782.00 



Showing a reduction 
mates and percentage, 
cial year of 1875-76, of 
that of 1874-75. 

Placing the tax to 
same as last year, the 
the year exhibit the 
with* that of last year : 



City and county , 
State 



of the appropriation esti- 
less revenue for the finan- 
$1,639,671, compared with 

be paid to the State at the 
estimated tax warrants for 
following result, compared 



1875. 
. $9,604,111.00 
. 802,120.00 



1874. 
$11,243,782.00 
802,120.00 



$10,406,231.00 $12,045,902.00 



The amount that can be added b^ the assessors, 
by authority of section 32, chapter 11, of th<? Gen- 
eral Statutes, for abatements, etc., must not ex- 
ceed five per centum. The amount that was add- 
ed last year was 4 72-100 per cent. During the last 
forty years, with a single exception, the taxable 
valuation has shown an annual increase. The 
valuation of 1860 was $276,861,000. The causes 
that compelled a reduction to $275,760,100, in 1861, 
although comparatively a small one,are too obvious 
to require comment. In view of the depression 
of business, which has now continued for many 
months over the whole country, the year 1875 must 
be an exceptional year. Certain classes of prop- 
erty have unquestionably decreased in value, and 
must be assessed at a lower rate. But, on the 
other hand, the books of the Department for the 
Inspection of Buildings show that $16,797,735 have 
been, during the past year, expended in the con- 
struction of new buildings. Taking the valuation 
of 1874, $798,755,050, and assuming that the valua- 
tion of 1875 ca i be safely placed at say $800,000,000, 
the rate of taxation upon the estimates submitted 
will, in my opinion be less than $14 per each one 
thousand dollars— a material redtiction from the 
rate ($15.60 per thousand) levied last year, and 
about the average rate for the last eleven years, 
$13.83. ' _ 

The Auditor's and Treasurer's departments 
ha\e been placed as regular standing appropria- 
tions, the expenses incurred by these departments 
having heretofore been charged to the appropria- 



104 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



tions for Salarits and Printing; and Stationery. 
The appropriations asked for the latter purposes 
have m consequence been reduced. Toe estab- 
lishment of four Municipal District Courts and 
the rearrangement of papers in the Prob?te Court, 
cause an increase id the app.opriation for the 
county of Suffolk. The Boaid of Directors tor 
Public Institutions require $29,400 additional for 
the current expenses of the several institutions, 
and an appropriation of 140,000 for a new steam- 
boat, and $16,500 for a new wharf at Rainsford 
Island, which the Committee on Public Institu- 
tions of the City Council approved, but they re-* 
jected an application of the Board for $45,000 
for a new building for truants at Deer Island. 
The total of exce.-s fo*' thi? board over that 
required last year is $60,400. The communications 
from the board are referred to for information 
respecting the new appropriations asked for. The 
amount for the Lamp Department is increased 
$56,000, for increasing the number of lamps, prin- 
cipally in the outlying wards. For the care, clean- 
ing and repairing of the schoolhouses, the amount 
shows an increase of $21,000; and for the like pur- 
poses for public buildings, $23,000. The Overseers 
of the Poor's requisition is $40,975 in excess of last 
year, principally caused by the alteration of the 
settlement law by the Legislature of 1874. The 
appropriation for Annuities is not continued, as 
the three amounts heretofore charged to the same 
will be paid, two from the appropriation for 
Widening Streets and one from that for In cider) tal 
Expenses. 

The principal items of reduction ate shown to 
be on those lequired for new, completion and im- 
provement ot buddings, $909,000; $300,000 for pav- 
ing, grading and repair of streets; and $307,000 
f or the Coc hituate Water Works. The principal 
losses in the income account are $50,000 from 
sewers and $20,000 from the Eajt Boston ferries. 
The amount asked for the ferries is $24,900 less 
than last year. In relation to the large loss of iu- 
come from the Sewer Department compared with 
the estimate ot last year, the Superintendent of 
Sewers in his annual report to the City Council 
says— 

"While the amount expended for sewers the 
past year is as large as usual, the amount of as- 
sessments levied has been only about one half that 
of 1873, and this disparity will increase unless some 
change can be effected in the law and ordinance 
now governing assessments. The statute pre- 
scribes that the cost of a sewer shall be propor- 
tioned upon the persons who receive benefit there- 
from, and the ordinance directs that the benefit 
shall be, practically, in proportion to the value of 
the abutting land. Whei e the sewers throughout 
a section are of nearly the same size -%nd cost of 
construction, and each abutter is assessed for his 
propottion of the cost of the sewer opposite bis 
property at the time of construction, it is evident 
that all would pay approximately alike in propor- 
tion to tbe area of their lots. But where a large 
district is to be drained by one great trunk sewer, 
with lateral branches constructed at intervals 
through a long series of yeai\3, it is obviously un- 
just to assess upon abutting property Che cost of 
the large sewer, which is built for the future ben- 
efit of a great district, and it is impossible, under 
our present laws, to apportion any of the cost 
upon the property not abutting, but which will 
ultimately use it, so that the city no longer col- 
lects thtee-fourths the cost of building sewers, 
but hardly one-fcuvth. The experience of this 
department has also shown that benefit from 
sewers should be assessed rather upon area than 
upon value of land, it generally happening that the 
land of least value (by law now assessed the least) 
is the most benefited by the sewer." 

He suggests an application to the Legislature, 
to enable the city to collect its proper proportion 
of the cost. The comparison of the estimates for 
1875-76 with the actual appropriations for 1874-75, 
ano of the estimated income for the same time 
compared with the estimates of 1874-75, may be 
found in the following tables, on pages 8, 9, 10: 

Appropriations of 1874-75. Estimates for 1875-76. 



Estimated. 

1874-5 1875-6 
Addition to City 

Hospital $190,000 

Advertising 6,000 4,000 

Annuities 512 

Armories 25,000 28,000 

Assessors' De- 
partment 1 04,729 109,000 

Auditor's Dep't 17.000 



Incr'se Decr'se 

.... $190,000 
2,000 
512 
3,000 

4,271 
17,000 



Board of Health, 
Quarantine De- 
partment and 
Evergreen 
Cemetery 122,700 

Boston Harbor. . 10,000 

Bridges 52,000 

Cedar Grove 
Cemetery 3,000 

Charles River 
and Warren 
Bridges 45,102 

Chestnut Hill 
Driveway 18,500 

City Hospital.... 120,000 

City Registrar's 
Department.... 12,400 

Common, Public 
Squares, etc.... 115,700 

Completion of 
Buildings - 125,000 

Contingen t 
Funds :.... 10,000 

County of Suf- 
folk 350,000 

East Boston Fer- 
ries 270,000 

Engineer's De- 
partment 30,881 

FireDepartment, 
Fire Alarms, 
Bells and 
Clocks 751,892 

Health Dep't.... 446,607 

Improvment of 
Buildings 40,000 

Incidental Exp's 87,000 

I n s p e c t i on of 
Buildings 22,000 

Interest and Pre- 
mium 2,055,000 

Lamps 455,500 

Markets 11,195 

Mt.Hope Ceme'y 17,500 

New Buildings, 
Health Dep't. . 

New Engine 
Houses 130,000 

JS ew School 
Buildings. 390,000 

Overseers of the 
Poor 101,825 

Old Claims 1,500 

Paving. Grading 
and Repairs of 
Streets 1,300,000 

Police 865,000 

Printing and Sta- 
tionery 38,000 

Public Baths 40,000 

Public Buildings 107,000 

Public Institu- 
tions, viz. : 
House of In- 
dustry 210,000 

House of Cor- 
rection 110,000 

Lunatic Hos- 
pital 65,000 

Pauper Expen- 
ses 60,000 

Steamboat "H. 

Morrison,"... 20,000 
Office E x p e n- 

' ses 9,00" 

New Laundry 
Building a t 
Deer Island.. 15,000 
New Steam- 
boat 

New Wharf at 
Rainsford 
Island 

Public Lands.... 6,000 
Public Library. . . 135,000 
Registration o f 
voters and 
Election Ex- 
penses 20,000 

Reserved Fund. . 300,000 

Salaries 101,000 

Schools and 
Schoolhouses, 
viz.: 

School Instruc- 
tors 1,256,600 

School Expen- 
ses, School 
Committee... 119,400 
Salaries of Offi- 
cers, School 
Committee... 35,400 
Schoolhouses, 
Com. Public 

Buildings 332,000 

Sch'lhouse Sites. 182,000 
Sealers Weights 

& Measures 7,400 

Sewers 300,000 

Sinking Fund 
Commissioners 2,800 



112,500 
10,000 
58,000 


eldoo 


10,200 


5,000 


2,000 


45,102 


5,000 
120,000 




13,500 


12,700 


300 





100,000 


— 


15,700 


36,000 




89,000 


10,500 


500 




365,000 


15,000 


.... 


245,100 




24,900 


29,000 


.... 


1,88) 


731,305 
430,000 




20,587 
16,607 


87",666 


.... 


40,000 


22,000 







2,028,000 

511,500 

10,000 

20,000 


56,'dd6 

2,500 


27,000 
l',195 


16,000 


16,000 




20,000 


.... 


110,000 


70,000 


— 


320,000 


142,800 
1,500 


40,975 


.... 


1,000,000 
865,000 


.... 


300,00« 


37,000 

30,000 

130,000 


23',666 


1,008 
10,000 


230,000 


20,000 


.... 


118,000 


8,000 


.... 


65,000 




— 


61,400 


1,400 


— 


20,000 




.... 


9,000 




. . . . 



15,000 



40,000 40,000 



16,500 


16,500 




8,000 
118,000 


2.000 


n'odo 


25,000 
300,000 
55,000 


5,000 


46",66d 


1,259,800 


3,200 


.... 


114,000 


.... 


5,400 


35,900 


500 


.... 


353,000 
6,000 


21,000 


176*000 


6,200 
300,000 




1,200 



2,800 



MARCH 



1875. 



1(J5 



Surveyor's De- 
partment 59,000 

Treasurer's De- 
partment .... 

Water Works .... 787,500 

Water Works, In- 
terest and Pre- 
mium 711,000 

West Boston & 
Cragie'sBridges 29,500 

Wld'ning Streets 300,000 



54,000 

34,300 
480,500 



717,000 

40,500 
300,000 



34,300 

6,000 
11,000 



5,000 



307,000 



Totals $13,645,143 $12,188,805 $355,446 $1,811,784 

The following table shows the estimated in- 
come of 1874-75 compared with that of 1875-76, with 
the increase and decrease in each : 

Estimated Estimated 



1874-75. 

Armories $16,000 

Board of Health and 

Quarantine 

Bridges 

*CharIes Kiver and 

Warren bridges 

City hospital 

Corporation tax 

Comity of Suffolk 

East Boston ferries. . 

Fees 

Fire Department 

Health Department. 

Interest 140,000 

Outstanding Taxes . . . 450,000 
Overseers of the Poor. 22,200 
Paving 25,000 



4,000 



1,250 

2,500 

350,000 

130,000 

220,000 

6,100 

2,000 

28,300 



Police. 

Public Institutions. 

Public Library 

Kents 

Schools 

Sewers 

Unclaimed Drafts. 



8,000 

60,000 

2,000 

125,000 

25,000 

100,000 

1,500 



Waterworks 1,010,000 



1875-76. 
$16,000 

6,0TO 
1,325 



2,500 

350,000 

130.000 

200,000 

5,900. 

2,000 

29,200 

175,000 

475,000 

30,500 

50,000 

8,000 

55,000 

2,000 

125,000 

19.000 

50,000 

1,500 

1,130,500 



Inc. Dec. 



$2,000 
1,325 



$1,250 



20,000 
200 



900 

35,000 

25,000 

8,300 

25,000 



5,000 

6,666 

50,000 



120,500 



Totals 



$2,728,850 $2,864,425 $218,025 $82,450 



* Included in Bridges, 1875-76. 
Total decrease of estimated appropriations 

for 1875-76 $1,811,784.00 

Total increase of estimated appropriations 

for 1875-76 355,446.00 



Net decrease of estimated appropriations 
for 1875-76 $1,456,338.00 



Income. 

Estimated income 1875-76 $2,8647425.00 

1874-75 2,728,850.00 



Increase of income 1875-76 $135,575.00 



Percentage of Taxes. 
3 per cent, on amount required ($10,916,293) 

in 1874-75 $327,489.00 

3 per ceit. on amount required ($9,324,380) 

in 1875-76 279,731.00 



Decrease in 1875-76 $47,758.00 



Recapitulation. 

Net decrease of appropriations in 1875-76... $1,456,338.00 

Net decrease of percentage in 1875-76 47,758.00 

Increase of income in 1875-76 135,575.00 

Decrease of the tax as before stated $1,639,671.00 



The accompanying communications, which I 
have received from the several boards, depart- 
ments and committees, give the details of the ap- 
propriations which they require. All of which is 
respectfully submitted.' 

Alfred T. Turner, 
Auditor of Accounts. 

Referred, on motion of Mr. Peabody of Ward 9. 
to the Committee on Finance with such as the 
Board or Aldermen may join. Sent up. 

PETITION PRESENTED. 

By Mr. Thacher of Ward 15— Petition of Sarah 
M. Bemis to be paid for personal injuries received 
from a tall in Brooks street. Referred to Joint 
Committee on Claims. Sent up. 

CLAIMS. 

Mr. Thacher of Ward 15, for the Joint Committee 
on Claims submitted a report recommending 
leave to withdraw on petition of William Wilson 
to be compensated for injuries to his wife by a 
fall in Billerica street. Accepted and sent up. 

PUBLIC LANDS. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6, for the Joint Committee 
on Public Lands, submitted reports on the peti- 
tions of Martin Hayes and Alfred Newhall, recom- 
mending the passage of the following orders : 



Ordered, That the time for building upon a lot 
of land on Albany street, corner of Newton street, 
as sold by the city to Allied Newhall in 1872, be 
extended to April 1, 1876, upon condition that he 
pays to the Superintendent of Public Lands the 
sum of $100 within ten days from the passage of 
this order. 

Ordered, That the tiaae for building upon a lot 
of land on Fourth street as sold by the city to 
Martin Hayes, be extended to April 1, 1876, upon 
condition that he pays to the Superintendent of 
Public Lands the sum of $100 within ten days 
from the passage of this order. 

Orders severally read twice and passed. Sent 
up. 

COLUMBUS-AVENUE EXTENSION. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 submitted the following: 

The Joint Standing Committee on Streets beg 
leave to report that there are before the Board of 
Aldermen for the final settlements of damages for 
the extension of Columbus avenue to Park square 
two orders to pay abutters on said avenue amount- 
ing to $20,162.92; and that there r?mains of the 
appropriation for the improvements but $11,285.30, 
leaving a required balance of $8877.62 tor its 
completion. It is the opinion of the Auditor 
of Accounts, upon consultation with the Commit- 
tee on Streets of the Board of Aldermen, that 
thi« deficit can be borne by the regular 
appropriation for Widening Streets, and the com- 
mittee therefore recommend the passage of the 
accompanying order for the transfer therefrom 
of the amount required, with a small amount for 
contingencies, to the appropriation for the Exten- 
sion of Columbus Avenue: 

Ordered, That the Auditor of Accounts be and 
he is hereby authorized to transfer from the 
appropriation for Widening Streets to that of the 
Extension of Columbus Avenue the sum of $9000. 

Referred to the Committee on Finance, on mo- 
tion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 7. Sent up. 

LIABILITY OF THE CITY IN THE MATTER OF LAY- 
ING OUT SWETT STREET. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6, for the Committee on 
the Judiciary, who were requested to obtain the 
opinion of the City Solicitor as to the nature of 
the liability of the city in case Swett street is not 
entered upon and built, submitted a report trans- 
mitting the following: 

City Solicitor's Office, ) 

2 Pemberton Square, } 

Boston, March 3, 1875. ) 

Sir— I have considered the questions you sub- 
mitted to me, under the order of the Common 
Council of the 25th ult., relating to Swett street. 
The facts of the case as I understand them are as 
follows : The street was duly laid out by the Street 
Commissioners, with the concurrence of the City 
Council, in December, 1874, but no entry 
has been made upon the land taken for 
the purpose of constructing the street. The 
owners of some of iheland over which the street 
was laid conveyed those lands to the city upon 
condition that the street should be built. Certain 
peisons subscriDed to pay sums amounting in the 
aggregate to about $60,000 towards the expenses 
of building the street, provided the street should 
be laid out, graded, and fitted for use on or before 
the first day of July, 1876. Under these circum- 
stances, if the street snail not be built, and the 
laying out be allowed to be lost by lapse of time, 
the liability of tha city on this account will be in 
my opinion — 

1. To pay the owners of the land taken for the 
street any damages they have sustained or may 
sustain by the taking and holding of their lands 
until the laying out shall have become void, which 
will be in December, 1876. 

2. To forfeit the title to the lands which were 
conveyed to the city to be used for the street. 

3. To relinquish the subscriptions made as con- 
tributions to the expenses ot building the street. 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. P. Healy. 
D. P. Kimball, Esq ., 
Chairman Judiciary Committee 

of the Common Council. 
The report was accepted. Subsequently, on 
motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 7, the City Solici- 
tor's opinion was ordered printed. 

transfers of appropriations. 

Mr. Peabody of Ward 9, for the Committee on 

Finance, submitted a report on the requests of the 

Overseers of the Poor and Committee on Public 

Builoings tor additional appropriations, recom- 



106 



COMMON COUNCIL 



mending the passage of the accompanying order, 
with a provision in the same, passed each year, 
giving the Auaitor of Accounts authority to make 
transfers for the purpose of closing the books at 
the termination of the present financial year: 

Ordered, That the A_uditor of Accounts be and 
he hereby is authorized to transfei from the un- 
expended balances ' of appropriations of this 
financial year to the appropriation Tor Overseers 
of the Poor, §25,000; to rhat for Primary school- 
house, Newbury strt et, the sum of $5000 ■; also to 
make such transfers of appropriations as are re- 
quired to make up defieieuces in other appropria- 
tions, and such others as may be necessary in 
closing the business of the financial year which 
terminates April 30, 1875; all such transfers to be 
reported to the Commictee on Finance for ratifica- 
tion. 

On motion of Mr. Burditt of Ward 16, the rale 
was suspended and the order read a second time 
and passed — yeas 59, nays 0. Sent up. 

CONSTRUCTION OF SWEIT STREET TO BE DELAYED. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6 offered the following: 

Ordered, That neither the Street Commissioners 
nor other agents of the city of Boston shall enter 
upon or take possession of auy lands for the pur- 
pose of constructing Swett street until thef unher 
ordering of the City Council. 

Mr. Kimball of VV aid 6— I desire to say in ex- 
planation of that order that the first step iu laying 
out streets and highways, as is well known, is to 
locate and lay them out upon paper. That has 
already been done by the Council. The second 
step is to enter upon and take possession of the 
lands for the purpo«e of constructing the street. 
As the liability of the city is greater af tpr the land 
is taken than it is wbeo the street is merely laid 
out upon paper, and as no appropriation has been 
passed, and as we might be involved in greater 
liabilities either by the Street Commissioners or 
other agents of the city taking possession of the 
street, 1 hope that the order will he passed that no 
such action be taken until the appropriation is 
made. 

Mr. Peabody of Ward 9—1 would like to know 
what would be the position of the city if a majori- 
ty of this Council should pass an order authoriz- 
ing contracts to be made for the constitution of 
Swett street, and then the propositiou to borrow 
the money for that purpose should fail to get the 
necessary two-thirds vote. I am at a loss to know 
what would he the liability in this case, and I wish 
some gentleman of more parliamentary experi- 
ence than I have would enlighten me. 

Mr. Jaques of Ward 9—1 do not rise because I 
have had the parliamentary experience; but, as I 
undersand it now, we have the opinion of the 
City Solicitor, which has been ordered 1o be 
printed, and that this subject will be laid upon 
the table to allow members to consider it and to 
ascertain what the effect of that action will be. I 
hope the order of the gentleman from Ward 6 
will pass, so that while this subject is under con- 
sideration no agent of the city will take any steps 
that will involve the city. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 16— As this subject, which is 
assigned for this evening at eight o'clock, is about 
to come up. 1 can see no necessity for passing the 
order of the gentleman from Ward 6, and I move 
to lay it upon the table. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6—1 hope that motion will 
not prevail. It is not probable that the question 
of Swett street will be pressed tonight by the gen- 
tleman who has the matter in charge, and it was 
for that reason that I introduced the order. 

Mr. Plynn of Ward 7 — There is an order on the 
table for the Committee on Streets to contract for 
the construction of Swett street, but there is r.o 
power to do anything till the appropriation is 
made. I have no desire to Dress the matter to- 
night and my object in moving to have the City 
Solicitor's opinion printed was that it might be a 
guide for the members in voting at the next meet- 
ing. 

Mr. Tram of Ward 13—1 was about to express 
the same opinion, and would add that the passage 
of the order would look like a reflection upon any 
parties connected with this Swett-street improve- 
ment. I should n't wish the idea to get abroad 
that there was any underhanded measures used to 
commit the city. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6--There is safety in the 
passage of this order. The gentleman last up 
must agree with me that it is best to stop where 
we are and examine this question, and see what 
the liability of the city and the railroad is. We 
don't know'what entering upon and taking pos- 



session of the land may mean, — and whether it 
is n't possible to enter upon and take possession, 
n the language of the law, and so comm.t the city 
to the greater expenditure, even though the order 
for the contracts had not been passed. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 16 — As an advocate of the 
extension of Swett street, and believing that its 
advocates do not wish to take any unfair advan T 
tage, I will withdraw the motion to lay on the 
table, and hope the order will pass. 

The order was passed and sent up. 

PAY OF LABORERS IN EMPLOY OF CITY. 

Mr. Anderson of Ward 3 offered the following : 

Ordered, That ajjoiot special committee, con- 
sisting of three members of the Common Council, 
with such as the Board of Aldermen may join, be 
appornted to consider and report what action 
should be taken in order to equalize the pay of the 
laborers in the several departments of the City 
Government. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 16— I trust the gentleman 
will give some explanation of the order. 

Mr. Anderson of Ward 3 — I have been requested 
several times by parties employed iu different de- 
partments to ascertain why the pay was n't uni- 
form with that of other departments, but I have 
failed to find it out. I have spokeu to several gen- 
tlemen on the committee, and they told me "the 
only way to find out was to offer this order. 

Mr. Peikins— I hope the order will not pass, as 
it will look like a leflection upon the heads of de- 
partments, v, ho, it is assumed, are competent to 
hire men and pay such wages as seem best for the 
men and for the interest of the city, and this 
would look like an undue reflection upon them. I 
can see no practical good to come from it. 

Mr. Anderson— Beiug a member of the Salary 
Committee I made some allusion to this thing and 
I was told that the only way it could get parties to 
come forward and tell the reason was to offer this 
order. I hope it will pass. 

Mr. Power of Ward 22—1 have»heard complaints 
in Charlestown on this very subject, and I hope 
the order will pass, as I can see no harm in it. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5—1 think the order is in the 
right direction. I 'dm sorry to differ fiom my 
friend from Ward 16, who i' generally so correct, 
but I don't think he appreciates this matter. 
There is gross inequality m the pay of laborers by 
the heads of departments; I have heard it com- 
plained of ever since I have been a member of the 
City Government. It certainly can do no harm, 
and I hope it will pass. 

Mr. Peabody of Ward 9— Any person who has 
watched a gang of city men working will see a 
very remarkable difference in the work they do. 
Some are steady, industrious and hard workers; 
others do very little work; some almost none. I 
have been surprised to see how little some can do, 
when I have stopped to watch them. It seems to 
me that the persons to decide on the pay are the 
heads of the departments, and that they will pay 
men what they are worth, and to insist "that they 
should pay all alike is hardly a judicial transac- 
tion. It would be wise to leave it in the hands of ■ 
those who are responsible. 

Mr. Anderson of Ward 3— The gentleman speaks 
of the beads of departments. I don't understand 
that they turo out at four o'clock in the morning 
to look after these men, nor does the gentleman 
himself turn out at that time, but when he sees 
them they are pretty well played out. But they 
don't stop there; they have to work through the 
dav and go on at the same time next morning. 

Mr. Harrigan of Ward 1 — I don't understand 
that the passage of this order will reflect uuon the 
heads of departments. It will be the appointment 
of a committee to ascertain why the wages of the 
men are not equalized. It is a well-known fact, to 
me at least, that certain laborers in the same 
gang get more wages than certain other 
ones for doing no more work than men 
alongside of them do for less money. The 
heads of departments may not really know 
what those men do; they may think they are en- 
gaged in some little slight handicraft of sweeping- 
streets and shovelling snow. This order cannot 
affect any head of a department, and it may go 
far towards righting a wrong that the laborers 
think exists. There are several hundreds of them, 
and we know their lot is hard enough, if they 
don't work quite as hard or do quite as much as 
some of us would like them to do. If we don't do 
any more, we certainly can appoint this commit- 
tee to ascertain what their grievances are. If 
they have no grievances, it will do no harm ; if 
there are, we will right them. I can't see how 
any ODe can object to that. 



MARCH 4, 1875 



107 



Mr. Page of Ward 9—1 move to amend by sub- 
stituting- the Joint Standing; Committee on Sala- 
ries for the appointment of the joint special com- 
mittee. It seems to me that this is the right com- 
mittee; they have had charge of the subject, and 
I think they can investigate and report better 
than any one else. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7—1 hope the order will pass 
as amended bv the gentleman from Ward 9, and 
for more than ore reason. The one in particular 
which I have in my mind now is that they may re- 
port to this Council why it was that the' Commit- 
tee on Lamps on the part of the other branch re- 
duced the salaries of the poor lamplighters from 
2y 4 cents to 2 cents a lamp. It seems to me that 
some reason should have been given to the Coun- 
cil when the reduction was made. It appears 
there is an equality there at least. I hope that 
when their half a million appropriation is asked 
for the Council will know why the poor lamplight- 
ers' pay was i educed. 

M-. Crock°r— The order, it seems to me, is a 
little too broad in its terms. We might pass 
something a little more definite, and see what is 
aimed at." This is to consider why the wages in 
all the departments are different. Of course there 
is a reason. There are laborers of different de- 
grees of skill; some work easy and some hard, 
and it seems to me the committee would have a 
question of indefinite extent to consider. I don't 
know whether anything particular is aimed at, 
but it seems to me if there is, it should be special- 
ly named in the order, but not appoint a commit- 
tee to see why laborers in one department are 
paid one sum audin another department anoter 
sum, or why the laborers in one gang in the same 
department are paid a less sum than others. It 
would simplify tne question immensely to specify 
something. Of course there must be great in- 
equalities. 

Mr. Jaques of Ward 9 — I see no objection to the 
passage' ot the order if it is amended as proposed 
by my colleague from Ward 9. I cannot under- 
stand the reason for the inequalities alluded to by 
the gentleman from Ward 6, but of course it can- 
not be supposed that the laborer who sweeps the 
streets should receive the same salary as the City 
Treasuier. The simple intention is' to find out 
why an inequality exists among laborers of the 
same class. 

Mr. Sweetser of Ward 10— I don't understand 
the object of this ojder, but it seems to me we 
should be establishing rather a dangerous prece- 
dent if when or. e class of m<=n employed by the 
city are aggrieved by their wages, they should 
come to the City Council and have a commit- 
tee appointed to investigate. If they have any 
grievances they should go to the paities with 
whom thev -contract and make their grievances 
known to them. I don't kr.ow that we should in- 
terfere with the heaas of department-. I hope the 
order will not pass unless some better reason is 

fiven than has been given tonight. There must 
e something more in it than merely to ascertain 
the pay of the laborers and apportion it. I don't 
knov/ how we could remedy it. 

Mr. Kelly of Ward 21—1 hope the oi der will pass. 
1 don't know that there are different grades of la- 
borers, and I have worked among them for twen- 
ty-five or thirty years. My attention has been 
brought to the city laborers sweeping the streets, 
and I find that they woik fully as hard as the men 
who use the pick and shovel. As to the different 

frades, I think they come by favoritism of the 
oss. I believe the city of Boston pays laborers 
no more thau private citizens do, and i do not see 
why ths city should take advantage of these hard 
times anv more than private citizen? do. The 
general wages is $2 a day, and any private citizen 
will pay that. It is right to talk it over here and 
see that the citizen gets proper pay for his labc, 
and this is the place to decide the question. There 
is of course some difference in laborers — a strong 
man will do more work than a weak man, and a 
young man more than an old one; but you will 
find that the men longest on the list get tlie most 
wages, even if they do no more work. 

Mr. Power of Ward 22— The reason I am in favor 
of the order is, I was informed by a lamplighter in 
Charlestown that, they were not paid the same 
price for lighting lamps that ttiey are in Boston. 

The amendment of Mr. Paee was adopted. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6 moved to amend by strik- 
ing out "several departments" and inserting in- 
stead, "Health and Paving departments." 

Mr. Page of Ward 9— If we are to investigate 
the pay of laborers in one department it vi ouid be 
better to look into them all. It certainly can do 



no harm, and if the committee make an extended 
investigation I think they can furnish informa- 
tion that will be of some benefit to us. I don't 
know what special case called for this order, but 
it certainly seems to me to be better to pass the 
order as it is. The Lamp Department has been 
mentioned, and they may want to include that in 
the list. The committee can look into whatever 
department rhey choose snd report to this Coun- 
cil. I hope the order will pass without specifying 
any particular department. 

Mr. Kimball said he understood from the mover 
that the Health and Pavmg departments were al- 
luded to, but as it was desirous to extend the 
matter he would withdraw the amendment. 

The order was passed and sent up. 

THE SWETT-STKEET LOAN. 

On motion of Mr. Kimball of Ward 6 the Coun- 
cil proceeded to consider the special assignment 
for eight o'clock, viz.: Order for a loan of $476,- 
000, for widening, building and extending Swett 
street from Albany street to Dorchester avenue. 

Mr. Flvnn of Ward 7 moved that it be specially 
assigned tor 8y 2 o'clock next Thursday evening, 
but withdre w it at the request of Mr. Kimball, 
who desired to offer some amendments and give 
his reason therefor, that they might be considered 
in connection with the whole subject. 

Mr. Kimb; 11— I move to amend the order by 
striking out "$476,000" and ir setting "$376 000": 
also to add at the end of the order, "provided 
that no patt of said sum sUall be used or expend- 
ed for the purpose of changing the grade of the 
railroad referred to iu chapter 387 of the acts of 
1874." Since the last meeting of the Council I 
have ascertained that there was a special act 
passed by the Legislature in 1874, providing that 
the corporation known as the New York & 
New England Railway should be at the 
expense of raising the grade of their rail- 
road, the city to construct the iron bridges 
and abutments, and maintain the same. Upon 
inquiry at what I deemed the proper office in the 
City Hall, I ascertained that $100,000 would not 
have been put into this sum if the interpretation 
had been put upon that act that I put on it,— that 
is to say that the railroad must be at the expense 
of raising the grade of their railroad. 1 was fur- 
ther told that the estimates embraced about $100,- 
000 tor raising the grade of that railroad and do- 
ing the work which it belonged to that corpora- 
tion to do. For that leason I think it is not wise 
to pass an appropriation of $476,000 based upon 
the estimates of the City Engineer. As the order 
reads, it includes $100,000 for raisi ig the grade of 
that road. I do not know that in passiug an ap- 
propriation of $476,000 we necessarily commit the 
city, or that the city could not afterwards com- 
pel the railroad to raise the grade, but I do think 
it wise at this time to appropriate rot more than 
$376,000 if we appropriate anything. I suppose 
there is scarcely a gentleman who does not sup- 
pose that we shall be called upon to make a fur- 
ther appropriation for some matter connected 
with the finishing of Swett street, and if we find 
that the city for any reason must go forward and 
raise the grade of the railroad, then we can appro- 
priate the money and look to the company to 
reimburse us, if they are able. The second 
amendment provides that no part of the $376,- 
000 should be used for raising the grade of 
the road, The act of the Legislature con- 
templates that in case the city and rail- 
road company do not agree upon a grade, that shall 
be veferre 1 to the Railroad Commissioners, who 
shall fix the grade, and the grade having been fixed, 
the company must build it within one year from 
that time. The act further provides that the Su- 
preme Court, by suitable decree, shall have power 
to enforce the decision of the Railroad Commis- 
sioners. It does n't seem wise to me to appropri- 
ate $376,000 and stop there, because it would then 
appear that that sum was based upon these esti- 
mates. It should distinctly appear that it is not 
the intention of this Government to use any por- 
tion of this money to do that which another party 
is bound to do. I shall not object to a further as- 
signment if any gentleman desires it. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 15—1 agree with th? re- 
remarks of the last gentleman. If this matter 
foes over till next week I think we can reduce it 
50,000 more, and that $300,000 will be sufficient to 
finish this work. In the estimates given by the 
committee, there is for filling Swett street (includ- 
ing &lopes) 23,000 squares at $6, $138,000; for filling 
to rai-e the grade of the Hartford & Erie Rail- 
road (including slopes) 13,000 squares at $5,.$65,- 



108 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



000. I was told today by a gentleman who has 
done a great deal of that business that it could be 
done for $3.75. At any rate it can be done for $4, 
and tbat will reduce the appropdatiou down to 
$300,000. I bope we shall not increase tbe loan 
unless it is absolutely necessary. 

Mr. Elynn of Ward 7 — As the amendments are 
important ones and the committee do not desire 
to press this matter, I move that the subject be 
specially assigned to next Thursday evening at 
half-past eight o'clock. 

Tbe motion prevailed. 

COMMON AND PUBLIC GROUNDS. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 said he was authorized by 
the Joint Committee on Common and Public 
Grounds to off-r the following: 

Ordered, That rhe Committee on '"omuoon and 
Public Grounds be authorized to expend a sum 
not to exceed $1500 iL addition to the appropria- 
tion heretofore m»de, for labor on the public 
grouurts; also that they be authorized to expend 
a sum not exceeding $200 in addition to tbe ap- 
propriations heretofore made, for tools and re- 
pairs on the same ; said sums to be charged to the 
appropriation for Common and Public Grounds. 

Mr. Shaw — I rise to move to suspend the rule— I 
believe it is the first time in my life I ever made 
such a motion— that the order may be passed to- 
night. There are sev-ral items of labor and mer- 
chandise which ought to be paid, and the Auditor 
desires to make up the roll. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6— J do not object to sus- 
pending the rule if it is absolutely necessary, but 
it is my impression that chey will not get their pay 
till the first of next month, even if the rules are 
suspended. 

Mr. Shaw— If that h his only reason, I don't 
think it is a good one. 

Mr. Kimball— I have other reasons. 

Mr. Shaw — I wish he would state them. 

Mr. Kimball —One is as good as a host. 

Mr. Shaw — I don't desire to take notice of any 
such remark; it is beneath me. I have stated a good 
reason for suspen liu g the rules. The matter was 
brought before a special meeting of the commit- 
tee tod iy tor the special purpose of having it 
passed. There are laborers suffering for tbe want 
of their money. The passage of the order to- 
night will be honored by the Auditor, and he, be- 
ing a humane man, will do something that these 
poor people may get their pay. I made the motion, 
not that I have any pride or interest in the mat- 
ter, but simply as an act of justice. 

The rule was suspended and the order passed. 
Sent up. 

DIVISION OF THE WARDS. 

Mr. Wbitmore of Ward 4 submitted a report in 
part from the Joint Special Committee on tbe 
Census and Division of Wards [City Doc. No. 33]. 
Tbe report embraces the tabular statement of the 
number of voters in the several wards (printed in 
the report of the last meeting), and the reasons 
of the committee for submitting the following 
order, appended to the report: 

Ordered, That his honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to amend his petition, now before the Legisla- 
ture, so that the number of wards after the new 
census shall be fixed at thirty-two, with two mem- 
bers of the Common Council and two members of 
the Board of School Committee from each ward. 

The report was accepted. 

On motion of Mr. Whitmore, the special assign- 
ment for 8% o'clock, viz., order to amend the peti- 
tion for a new number of wards, to provide that 
each ward shall elect rwomembeisof the Common 
Council and two members of the School Commit- 
tee, was taken up and then laid upon the table. 

The order submitted by the committee was then 
read a second time and put upon its passage. 

Mr. Whitmore — When the Council last adjourn- 
ed, the question before it was on tbe amendment 
I offered to increase the number of Wards to 
thirty-six. Since then the committee has arrived 
at certain results which have been embodied in 
the report submitted this evening. They unani- 
mously decided to report that order. It will 
probably be unnecessary for me to add anything 
to what 1 have said befoie on the general subject 
of passing such an order at this time. The only 
question in dispute at the last meeting, among 
members of the committee atleast, was the limit of 
the number of wards ; but they have unanimously 
arrived at tbe conclusions presented this evening, 
and I have withdrawn my own views in favor of 
thirty-six wards, and give my preference to the 
decision of the committee, and I trust that the 
order will be passed. 



Mr. Crocker of Ward 6—1 think we are hardly 
prepared to determine upon fixing the number of 
wards at thirtv-two. It seems to me to be just as 
well to ask the Legislature to ask for some discre- 
tion, and to allow us between a certain limit. The 
new charter is soon comina up. We shall have 
a great deal of light upon this matter, and we may 
then determine more intelligently as to the exact 
number best to be agreed upon. It will be as well 
to leave the door open I have not readthe report 
of this committee and I don't know the ground on 
which they base their recommendations. Then it 
may be desirable to postpone the final division of 
the wards till next year. Next winter tbe Legis- 
lature will determine the number of voters re- 
quired to elect one representative, and we shall 
have to apportion the representatives to the dif- 
ferent wards according to the number of voters 
in each. That may prove an important element 
in the division, and for that reason it would be de- 
sirable to postpone it, especially if we don't get 
the new charter this year, as it is altogether 
probable we shall not, and we may not 
get it at all. Then it may not be desirable 
to make a division of the wards till after 
tbe new charter is in force. Therefore, 
I move to amend the order by striking out 
"32" and inserting, m place thereof, "not less than 
20, no more than 40," and to add at the end, "and 
that the city may be authorized, if it deems expe- 
dient to do so, to postpone the new division of its 
wards until the year 1876." Tnat is simply putting 
the petition so as to give us a little more leeway, 
and not to tie ourselves up as we otherwise 
would . 

Mr. Whitmore— It is hardly necessary to say 
tbat this objection is in effect the same one made 
by the gentleman at the last meeting. Is it desir- 
able to postpone a duty which can only be done in 
accordance with the General Statutes of the 
State, from this year to another one? Unless 
some very good reason is given to the Legislature, 
. I hardly think they will see the necessity of re- 
pealing a statute. The primary idea of the gen- 
tleman's motion is to put off this matter till if is 
settled hythe new charter. I spoke at the last 
meeting of the old cbaiter being our guide, for a 
year at least. The statutes only allow us to »lter 
the wards once in ten years; and unless we 
give the Legislature some good reason, I hardly 
think tbf y would comply with a request to allow 
it to be done in 1876. The difference between the 
gentleman and myself is this : He undoubtedly de- 
sires a small number of wards and a great reduc- 
tion of the Common Council, and if that can be 
done now, tbat difficulty in the way of having a 
new charter adopted is removed. My object in 
having it done now is to make as little change as 
possible, and I desire to postpone tbe discussion 
of tbe new charter till it is before us. At the last 
meeting I proposed thirty-six wards, which re- 
duced the Council only two members; but after 
consultation with my colleagues on the com- 
mittee we found we could all agree upon 
thirty-two, and I withdrew my preierenee. 
Unless we cannot make up our minds to do our 
duty tonight I can see no advantage in refusing 
to act tonight. The gentleman undoubtedly 
knows the opinion of the committee on there- 
vision of the new charter, but I do not. I under- 
stand that the limit fixed by them is that the 
number of wards shall not be less than thirty nor 
over thirty -six, and t ere fore there cannot be 
great impropriety in our fixing the number at 
thirty-two and having it so in case the old charter 
stands or the new one is adopted. Our duty is to 
make such a division that the wards will contain 
an equal number of voters. If we waited 
months we could get no more information, 
and until the new census is taken no mem- 
ber's opinion is worth anything. The committee 
have considered the probable number of voters in 
the city, and the number of representatives to 
which Boston will be entitled in the Legislature, 
and it is impossible for any man to decide in ad- 
vance that 24, 30, 32 or 40 is the number by which 
to make a more equal division. We must look at 
it a little in the light of common sense, and see 
the effect any number will have upon the Com- 
mon Council and the School Committee. In 
asking that the Council be reduced from 74 to 64, 
the committee have asked for as much as would 
be granted; in reducing the School Commit- 
tee to 64 we certainly have made a great 
change. There seems to be a great reluctance 
on the part of the opponents of this order to give 
a definite objection to amending our present 
charter. Certainly it would seem to be the most 



MARCH 4, 1875 



109 



sensible to do the work now, even if we have to do 
it over again. If the objection is to tie specific 
number, I am prepared to hear any amendment, 
aod take the sense of the Council upon that; but 
to postpone it I think is not for the best interest 
of the citv. 

Mr. Brackett of WardlO— I hope the amendment 
of the gentlernau from Ward 6 will prevail. If 
we can obtain the privilege of postponing this 
division of the wards till nezt year it will be very 
desirable to do so, because it is well known that 
the new apportionment of Representatives will 
not tike place till next year. If we make the 
division this year we will have difficulty in appor- 
tioning the Representatives next year. The city 
now has forty-five Representatives, exclusive of 
Ward 19, which is a part of one of the Middlesex 
districts. It is generally expected that Boston 
will gain in the next apportionment of Representa- 
tives. Suppose we get fifiy Representatives and 
have thirty-two wards, how can you divide them 
fairly. We cannot divide award to make a Repre- 
sentative district, and we cannot have more than 
three Representatives to a district. If we have 
thirty Representatives ana thirty-two wards, the 
only way to apportion toem will be to give one 
ward two Representatives, and another of equal 
voting strength only one. This same difficulty, I 
apprehend, was met when the last apportionment 
took place; at any rate injustice was done some 
of the wards then. The last division took place iu 
1865, and the new apportionment in 1866. xii look- 
ing at the ordinance passed in 1865, I And that 
Ward 10, from which I come, with 2546 voters had 
only two Representatives,while Ward 11, with 2563 
voters had three Representatives, which is cer- 
tainly unfair for Ward 10. If we could have the 
division of the wards done the same year as the 
apportionment, this difficulty could be adjusted. 
If we are entitled to fifty Representatives, the best 
number of wards would be twenty-five, and then 
each ward will be a Representative district. The 
custoiu of dividing the wards every ten years re- 
sulted from a statute passed in 1865. Tbat, of 
course, can be changed by the Legislature at any 
time. It seems to me there is very strong reason 
why the Legislature should be asked co give us 
the privilege of postponing it till next year. 

Mr. Shaw— The argument of the gentleman 
from Ward 10 is entirely in favoi o£ the proposi- 
tion of the gentleman from Ward 4. There are 
gross inequalities in the Representative districts. 
Ward 5, which I endeavor to represent in part, 
has 1183 voters and three Represent ativer, while 
the Ninth Ward has 3095 voters and two Represent- 
atives. The sooner we equalize that matter the 
better, and it is grossly out of the way to under- 
take to postpone that which should be regulated 
this year. The division comes by custom every 
ten years, and the equalization should be made 
now. If it takes place Ward 10 will probably get 
its fair representation. I admit it hasn't one 
now, but certainly the Fifth Ward has a great deal 
more than its due. Upon af air equalization but one 
Representative should go from each ward . Ward 
8 has 2000 voters aod two Representative- ; the 
sooner that inequality is done away with the bet- 
ter. It is too apparent to be used as an argument 
for postponement, and I hope it will not be. 

Mr. Wilson of Ward 12 — I have listened with a 
great! deal of pleasure to the remarks of gentle- 
men upon this question. I submit that while we 
are re-districting the city we should look to the 
proper representation in this chamber, wheie the 
inequality is greater than in the Legislature. 
Ward 1 has 5140 voters on the list and four votes 
here; Ward 12 has 4627 voters and four 
votes; while Ward 5, with 1183 voters, 
has four members, and so on through the 
city. This is where the inequality comes. It is 
n't so much an anxiety to me if a ward has one or 
two more votes in the Legislature as it is to have 
double the representation on this floor. I have 
some recol'ection of how the division was made 
in 1865. I know that the members of the Legisla- 
ture were parcelled out among those wards that 
were expected to grow. Ward 12 was not expect 
ed to grow, and they gave Ward 5 an extra Repre- 
sentative because it whs expected to grow. 

The best thing to think of is the representation 
upon this floor. The Legislature will fix the num- 
ber of members we must have. I should piefer 
forty, fifty or sixty ; the business would be better 
attended to, but it wouldn't be such a general 
debating club. There should be some relation 
between the number of members and the number 
of the wards. If you have sixty members you 
don't want thirty-two wards. The difficulty of 



inequality of representatives could be obviated : 
but the inequality of members of the Council 
cannot be obviated so easily. I cannot 
agree with the committee, because I think 
they make too many wards, — and it will 
require th«8 building of ten or -fifteen ward 
rooms, at an immense expense; I should 
think it an excellent arrangement in the interest 
of contractors and those who wish to put up 
buildings at the public expense. My experience 
is that from Ward 12, which is always Republican, 
we come here with a mixed ticket, and you al- 
ways have had one Democrat — and it is because the 
people pick out the best men. We have 4500 or 
4600 votes, and don't think anything of poll- 
ing 2500 at the election, and the ward 
officers earn their money, which I believe 
they should do. Within a certain limit, I think a 
small number of wards would be better. With a 
total vote of 57,000, twenty-one wards would be all 
I would make, and that would give ample oppor- 
tunity for growth; would answer for ten years, 
and save the expense for wardrooms, the loca- 
tion of which is one of the greatest difficulties. I 
don't like the sliding scale of the gentleman from . 
Ward 6, and I don't want to go to the Legislature 
and ask for what I believe they will not grant. I 
should prefer to pass the order as it is and let the 
Legislature fix the number to suit themselves. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6— It seems to me the 
Legislature cannotobject to giving us the pri vilsge 
of fixing the wards; the out of town members 
don't care what number of wards we have If 
they will give us what we ask for, why would n't 
they let us fix it this year or nex^, within reason- 
able limits. If they will not, perhaps by that 
time we shall have considered the charter and de- 
cided it. It is important, as the gentleman from 
Ward 5 says, to do away with the inequalities in 
the Legislatuie. But it is impossible to do that 
this year, and all we can remedy this year is 
the inequality in this Council. It would seem 
best not to divide the wards till we get the ex- 
act basis to go upon. The division of the wards 
and the apportionment of Representatives should 
properly be made after the census is taken. And 
there seems to be very strong reasons for waiting, 
if we wait we shall probably have the opportunity 
to decide this matter ana tne new charter to- 
gether. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 — I was looking to the Legis- 
lature of next year. The gentleman is correct in 
regard to the feeling of the Legislature. I can 
testify that tie country members are ready to do 
that which Boston asks. But we must go there 
with a definite pioposition. The gentleman's ar- 
gument seems to put the cart before the horse. 
He wants the charter adopted and the wards to 
conform to the charter. The charter should be 
made to conform to the wards. He says it is 
doubtful if the charter is adopted. I think he is 
correct; you never can get such a' charter adopted 
so long as there is a spirit of republicanism in 
Boston. 

Mr. Harmon of Ward 6-1 agree with the gen- 
tleman from Ward 10 that to fix the wards in 1865 
and apporcion ihe Representatives in 1866 did 
cause great inequality, and it will be so this year. 
If we could have the number of Representatives 
this year we could apportion them easily. I hope 
the amendments will be adopted and the matter 
postponed until we have aoore information before 
us. 

Mr. Clarke of Ward 15— rhe machinery of the 
Council would work more smoothly if we had 
seventeen wards and could elect an Alderman 
from each, and the wards were divided into two 
districts aad elect members of the Council and 
representat